Immigration Status and Health

A collection of analyses and research findings examining the link between immigration status and health.

    • September 12, 2017
Children listen to free music while playing in a park.

When people in America are forced to live in fear because of their immigration status, their health and the health of our nation suffers.

The specter of deportation has harmful effects on the health of families and children. Research shows that immigrant families often forgo needed medical care and social services because they fear interactions with public agencies. In addition, the toxic stress associated with fear of deportation has been demonstrated to have harmful effects on an individual’s long-term physical and mental health.

Children are especially vulnerable to this type of trauma, which acts as a barrier to normal physical and mental development and health. Furthermore, fear of deportation has significant impact on uptake of non-medical services that are important to good health, including food assistance.

In connection with programs focused on identifying barriers to good health, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) has supported numerous studies examining the impact of immigration status on health. The below articles provide a sampling of analysis and research findings stemming from these efforts.

Overall community health is improved when everyone has access to preventive and regular health care and the ability to access services necessary to living a healthier life. At RWJF, we believe that everyone in the United States should have the opportunity to live the healthiest life possible, no matter their immigration status.

Your Path to Our Health Video Series

Your Path to Our Health Video Series

Series//Video Series: Your Path to Our Health

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Your Path to Our Health: Zindy's Path
  1. Your Path to Our Health: Zindy's Path

    Your Path to Our Health Video Series

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Your Path to Our Health Video Series

In the first video you will meet Esperanza, an undocumented immigrant who has been deported four times. The lynchpin of her extended family, she suffers from depression and anxiety but finds comfort at church and in a local clinic.

Your Path to Our Health Video Series

In the first video you will meet Esperanza, an undocumented immigrant who has been deported four times. The lynchpin of her extended family, she suffers from depression and anxiety but finds comfort at church and in a local clinic.

Resources for the Field

Achieving Health Equity

In a Culture of Health, everyone has the opportunity to live a healthier life, no matter who we are, where we live, or how much money we make.

Learn more