Author Archives: Charles Bruner

A Generational Opportunity to Invest in Our Children

Jul 5, 2022, 2:00 PM, Posted by Charles Bruner, Martha Davis

We identified exemplary practices to help foster the nurturing, stable environments that children need from birth through adolescence to thrive.

2017 Culture of Health Prize Communities: Garrett County, MD

The United States has the most advanced medical care system in the world and spends the most per capita on healthcare. Yet we lag behind other developed nations on important health indicators, including infant mortality, child wellbeing, adult disability, and overall life expectancy. The status quo is failing our kids, denying them a healthier and brighter future. More kids than ever face the prospect of growing up less healthy and living shorter lives than their parents. Children are more likely than any other age group to be poor and live in medically underserved and socially vulnerable communities. Unless we collectively take significant steps to improve our children’s health and development, we will face adverse consequences for years to come.

There is growing evidence on how to improve children’s wellbeing. With support from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the Integrated Care for Kids-InCK Marks Initiative spent the last six years bringing together pediatric practitioners, health administrators, policy experts, and advocates. InCK Marks’ advisors assessed pediatric healthcare practices and innovations, metrics, finances, and culture to identify tangible solutions that advance a culture of health for kids.

This work continually pointed us to—and eventually rooted us in—the value of early investments in preventive health and health promotion. While the return on investment may not be immediate, the dividends are lifelong, with ripple effects into all facets of life. The needed investments encompass more than just medical treatment; health systems must respond more proactively to the determinants that play a lasting role in children’s health, including economic (housing, food, and basic income) and social (relational supports and opportunities) factors.

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