Now Viewing: Health Leadership Development

Investing in the Next Generation of Health-Focused Leaders

Sep 12, 2016, 9:00 AM, Posted by Pam S. Dickson

Collaboration—among people who don’t traditionally work together on a daily basis and who bring unique perspectives—carries the best potential to solve today's complex health and social issues effectively and equitably.

Looking out upon the worshippers at New Era Church in downtown Indianapolis, Rev. Dr. Clarence C. Moore sees row after row of families facing difficult challenges stemming from a pressing statewide problem: the over-incarceration of black people. Indiana ranks second in the country for the number of children who have an incarcerated parent. As a result, many children live in single-parent households or foster care, and live in poverty. Many lack a formal education until they reach kindergarten—and so they aren’t ready when they get there. They struggle, many ultimately drop out of school, and the vicious cycle continues.

“I tell my congregation that there is nothing wrong with these seeds—these children,” Rev. Moore says. “It’s the soil these seeds are planted in that is the problem.”

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Honoring Andy Hyman: A Passionate Advocate for Health Equity

Aug 4, 2016, 9:37 AM, Posted by Brian C. Quinn

A new award celebrates and pays tribute to the life and work of Andy Hyman by recognizing a champion in the field of health advocacy.

My boss and mentor Andy Hyman was the kind of visionary leader who instilled a deep sense of hope in everyone he came into contact with. He inspired in us a feeling that anything was possible. It’s this kind of unwavering hope that is needed when pursuing seemingly insurmountable goals—like the goal of ensuring that everyone in America has access to affordable, quality health care coverage.

Andy led the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s (RWJF) work on health insurance coverage from 2006 until shortly before his untimely death in 2015. One of the things I vividly remember was his deep conviction—even when progress seemed elusive—that we could make major strides toward improving coverage for those who needed it the most. 

Among his many wonderful qualities, Andy had keen political foresight that revealed itself when I started working with him back in 2006. He predicted a window to put the spotlight on health reform in 2008, regardless of who was elected president. In preparation, he led our team in building evidence to make the case for health reform and in bolstering the capacity of community of advocates nationwide who could work on state-level reform. Once the Affordable Care Act (ACA) was enacted, Andy worked tirelessly to help implement it in the states.

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How to Build a More Diverse and Inclusive Nursing Workforce

May 9, 2016, 9:32 AM, Posted by Lucia Alfano

A nurse leader shares how she overcame significant barriers to pursue a successful career and what we can do to help minorities in nursing succeed.

I became a nurse by accident at a time in my life when I had no direction. My family had moved from Ecuador to Queens, New York when I was a child.

As a teen, there were times when I lived in group homes or even the streets and I felt completely lost. I dropped out of junior high.

When an acquaintance suggested in passing that I enroll in the nursing program at Queensborough Community College, I followed her advice without realizing that nursing would become my calling. I had to overcome obstacles that included lack of family support, finances and even basic academic skills.

I wanted so badly to be educated, that I persevered through these struggles. I found that I loved everything that had to do with nursing—from what we learned in class, to what we learned in the clinic, to volunteer work in the community.

I believe there are many young people who, like me, would thrive in nursing. But because of their background or existing challenges, they may believe that a career in nursing is not an option. In particular, young students may think that they cannot afford nursing school.  

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Four Enduring Life Lessons from a Career in Public Health

Feb 17, 2016, 10:30 AM, Posted by Najaf Ahmad

New York City’s new deputy mayor for health and human services shares how inspirational mentors and rich experiences have cultivated her career.

She was abruptly awakened by a phone call at 5:00 in the morning as Hurricane Katrina was ravaging New Orleans. Evacuees were fleeing the devastation and arriving in Houston by the tens of thousands to escape. Herminia Palacio was then the executive director of Houston’s Harris County Public Health and Environmental Services. She had until 11:00 p.m. to figure out how to care for them.

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Change Leaders: A New Network, Engaging Every Sector, to Build a Culture of Health

Feb 12, 2016, 10:00 AM, Posted by Pam S. Dickson

RWJF is opening applications for new programs that support the development of diverse health care leaders as well as leaders from other sectors who can help build health into our communities and the nation as a whole.

Few things inspire me like the challenge to build a Culture of Health in America. But success depends on the skills and creativity of our leaders—their ability to influence, inspire and lead in a rapidly changing world. Many of these leaders must also be part of those communities with limited resources and opportunities, if we are to tackle the pernicious effects of racism, poverty and inequity. They must represent every sector and discipline, recognizing that health is influenced by complex social factors beyond health care. These leaders have to abandon status quo, silos and their assumptions, and create a new reality.

This is the opportunity before us as we open applications for new Advancing Change Leadership programs on February 22. It continues our decades of work to support the development and diversity of health care leaders, and expands our investment to leaders from other sectors who have the passion, ingenuity and influence required to build health into our communities and nation as a whole. We are profoundly excited by the idea of a diverse network of dedicated leaders committed to equity and better health. Imagine how they will approach their work, cultivate the next generations of leaders, and accelerate the journey toward a Culture of Health!

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New Partners, New Ways of Thinking: Supporting “Change Leadership” to Build a Healthier Nation

Nov 19, 2015, 1:17 PM, Posted by Herminia Palacio

Building a Culture of Health requires supporting and connecting leaders who can drive change by tolerating risk and seeking inspiration through collaboration.

Building a Culture of Health isn’t easy. It may seem obvious, but think about it: Our nation didn’t develop its current Culture of Unhealth overnight. Reversing it won’t happen quickly, either. As John Lumpkin pointed out recently, paraphrasing Albert Einstein: “You cannot fix problems with the same logic you used in creating them.”

That’s why change leadership is so important.

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One Cure for the World’s Toughest Challenges? Bold Leaders, Connected

May 19, 2015, 9:00 AM, Posted by Herminia Palacio

Change leadership means thinking big about impact, responding to urgent needs, and actively tolerating risk. This is the kind of big, bold way of working—together—that will get us to a Culture of Health.

Just over a year ago, I started in a new role at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Not long after, my colleagues and I began the exciting, challenging, and collaborative process of co-designing four new programs that will develop, train, and network change leaders who will help build a Culture of Health.

You may be wondering – What is change leadership? How do we know it when we see it? And, why is it essential for achieving RWJF’s vision?

Here's the type of challenge our nation's leaders often face:

For a half-century, charities, nonprofits and local and federal governments have poured billions of dollars into addressing the problems plaguing [many] Americans. But each issue tends to be treated separately – as if there is no connection between a safe environment and a child’s ability to learn, or high school dropout rates and crime. –The Wall Street Journal, September 2013

Now here's an example of what change leadership looks like:

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Journey Towards Becoming a Mindful Leader

Feb 2, 2015, 11:35 AM, Posted by Teri Pipe, PhD, RN

In our fast-paced, overcommitted world, our typical automatic first response—to be better multitaskers and problem solvers—often leads to increased stress and reduced satisfaction. As leaders—especially in the high-stakes, quickly changing health care sector, we focus our attention outwardly on the well-being of others. We’re faced with a number of competing priorities, interruptions, and distractions that too often get the best of us. It seems that, for many, the noisy world has taken up residence within us.

As a nurse focusing on gerontology and oncology, I learned to help others find what was most important during times of bittersweet transition, prioritizing where and how their energy was spent. Through my clinical research experiences, I learned that the perception of stress, rather than a specific circumstance, could just as easily lead to physiologic consequences. I also observed how some people used their challenges to become more resilient, while others weakened.

Because of these experiences, the ideas of resiliency, mindfulness, and caring began shaping my research questions and investigations. My research and my work with my nursing colleagues showed me that teaching self-awareness, compassion and attention-focusing practices can reduce stress, build resilience and extend the positive impact of nurses and other leaders, including their ability to care for patients, strengthen communication, mentor others and lead successful organizations.

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Nurses Are Leading the Way to Better Health Care for Older Patients

Jan 21, 2015, 12:00 PM

Barbara Bricoli, MPA, is executive director of Nurses Improving Care for Healthsystem Elders (NICHE), an international program based at New York University’s College of Nursing that is designed to help improve the care of older adults. The program was developed by Terry Fulmer, PhD, RN, FAAN, chair of the National Advisory Committee for the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Executive Nurse Fellows program.

The rapid expansion of the aging population is a national concern. Nearly 20 percent of the U.S. population will be over age 65 by 2030, according to the U.S. Administration on Aging. And our aging population will place a heavy burden on our health care system; older adults, in fact, are hospitalized at three times the rate of the general population.

Yet health care providers lack adequate training in geriatrics and gerontology to care for older patients. Nurses Improving Care for Healthsystem Elders (NICHE) is working to change that.

Based at New York University’s College of Nursing, NICHE aims to better enable hospitals and health care facilities to meet the unique needs of older adults and embed evidence-based geriatric knowledge into health care practice. Hospitals and organizations that adopt NICHE report improved outcomes, decreased lengths of stay, better patient and staff satisfaction levels,  and higher success in building systemic capacity to effectively integrate and sustain evidence-based geriatric knowledge into practice.

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Rare Mettle

Dec 9, 2014, 9:00 AM

For the 25th anniversary of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s (RWJF) Summer Medical and Dental Education Program (SMDEP), the Human Capital Blog is publishing scholar profiles, some reprinted from the program’s website. SMDEP is a six-week academic enrichment program that has created a pathway for more than 22,000 participants, opening the doors to life-changing opportunities. Following is a profile of Rachel Torrez, MD, a member of the Class of 1990.

The year was 1992. Rachel Torrez, a second-year medical student, was in line waiting for coffee at the University of Washington when a White male student confronted her.

“You took my best friend’s spot because of quotas,” he sneered.

The granddaughter of Mexican migrant workers, Torrez enrolled at a time when students of color were few and some people—especially in Washington state—were questioning the fairness of affirmative action. Clarence Thomas, an outspoken opponent of affirmation action, had recently joined the Supreme Court.

“We don’t have quotas,” Torrez shot back. “I took your best friend’s spot because I was smarter.”

That mix of brains and backbone is characteristic of Torrez, who conquered severe dyslexia and cultural constraints on her way to an MD. Now a family-practice physician in the Ballard neighborhood of Seattle, Torrez gives as good as she gets.

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