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Closing Health Gaps: The Oklahoma Example

Dec 7, 2015, 8:00 AM, Posted by Andrea Ducas

With the right data to inform priorities, and a powerful commitment to equity, places like Tulsa, Okla., are making progress to close health gaps.

Adult and child reading a book in the classroom.

What would your ideal future look like? For me and my colleagues at the Foundation, it would be one where everyone has the opportunity to live the healthiest life they can.

An unfortunate reality in this country, however, is that while we continue to realize substantial gains in health, the things that help people become and stay healthy are not evenly distributed across states or even metropolitan areas. Access to healthy foods, opportunities for exercise, good-paying jobs, good schools, and high quality health care services may be readily available in one area, and difficult to come by or nonexistent in another just a few miles away.

Sometimes the differences are particularly stark: In some communities, two children growing up just a short subway or car ride apart could be separated by a 10-year difference in life expectancy.

So how do we square this reality with the Culture of Health we’re working hard with others to build? An important first step is recognizing those disparities and what’s driving them, and ensuring that people in communities across America have strategies – and the data – they can use to proactively close health gaps.

Let’s use Oklahoma, and within it the city of Tulsa, as an example.

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Field Notes: What Cuba Can Teach Us about Building a Culture of Health

Jan 29, 2015, 9:54 AM, Posted by Maryjoan Ladden, Susan Mende

Ever since President Obama announced the restoration of diplomatic ties between the United States and Cuba, there’s been growing excitement over the potential for new opportunities for tourism, as well as technology and business exchanges. Most people assume that the flow will be one-sided, with the United States providing expertise and investment to help Cuba’s struggling economy and decaying infrastructure.

That assumption would be wrong. America can—and already has—learned a lot from Cuba. At RWJF, we support MEDICC, an organization that strives to use lessons gleaned from Cuba’s health care system to improve outcomes in four medically underserved communities in the United States—South Los Angeles; Oakland, Calif.; Albuquerque, N.M.; and the Bronx, N.Y. Even with very limited resources, Cuba has universal medical and dental care and provides preventive strategies and primary care at the neighborhood level, resulting in enviable health outcomes. Cuba has a low infant mortality rate and the lowest HIV rate in the Americas, for example—with a fraction of the budget spent in the United States.

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How Data Will Help Me Keep My Resolution

Jan 27, 2015, 10:54 AM, Posted by Emmy Ganos

Illustration showing how data can inform health

It's a brand new year and like many Americans, I'm thinking about New Year’s resolutions—specifically, fitness and exercise resolutions. People who know me well know how I feel about working out (Hint: I don't like it. Or do it). But I have lots of good reasons for wanting to start. I turned 30 this year, so I’m starting to age out of that Young Invincible demographic (#GetCovered), and realizing that I am, in fact, “vincible.” As I get older, and watch my parents age, it's starting to hit home that getting to a particular shape or size really isn't the point. The point is getting my heart and body in the best shape I possibly can.

So this year, New Year’s resolution time feels a little different. And as I start thinking about making some changes, I’m reflecting back over the last two Data for Health listening sessions I attended in Charleston and San Francisco. As a result, I’ve decided that it’s time to think about setting my New Year’s resolutions in an entirely different way--by using data.

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So Much Data! How to Share the Wealth for Healthier Communities

Jan 14, 2015, 5:15 PM, Posted by Alonzo L. Plough

The world of research and evaluation is experiencing a dramatic increase in the quantity and type of available data for analysis. Estimates are that an astonishing 90 percent of the world’s data has been generated in just the past two years. This flood of facts, figures, and measurements brings with it an urgent need for innovative ways to collect and harness the data to provide relevant information to inform policy and advance social change. “Not long ago, we had a problem of insufficient data,” says Kathryn Pettit, a senior research associate at the Urban Institute. “Today we have more data than ever before, but we still need to build capacity to use it in meaningful ways.”

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What We Can Achieve By Working Together

Jan 13, 2015, 10:49 AM, Posted by Marjorie Paloma

As part of our What’s Next Health series, RWJF regularly talks with leading thinkers about the future of health and health care. Recently, we spoke with Nate Garvis, founder and author of Naked Civics, about entrepreneurial thinking and how it can be applied to building a Culture of Health. RWJF Director Marjorie Paloma reflects on Nate's approach.

What would you be willing to do to learn?

This is just one of many provocative questions Nate Garvis of Naked Civics is asking the Foundation as we look to build a Culture of Health.

Many times, we come across people who seem to have all the answers. But Nate doesn’t pretend to. Instead, he uses questions that help us journey through an issue, guiding us toward a new type of discovery process—one that takes us to uncomfortable places and challenges us to work with unlikely bedfellows.

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Top 10 Signs We are Building a Culture of Health

Dec 17, 2014, 7:18 PM, Posted by Catherine Arnst

Daycare teachers play with a group of young children outside.

Last January the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation alerted the world to its new strategy: To build a Culture of Health for all, one that would allow every one of us to make healthy choices wherever we live, work, and play. A big reach, we know, but we are nothing if not optimistic. So, 12 months on, we asked ourselves—How’re we doing? Pretty good, as it turns out. Here are the top 10 signs that America is moving towards a Culture of Health (in no particular order).

10. The evidence is in—kids are beginning to slim down.

Research published in February shows continued signs of progress toward reversing the childhood obesity epidemic: Obesity prevalence among 2 to 5 year olds dropped by approximately 40 percent in eight years, a remarkable turnaround. There is still much work to do in this area, but at least our youngest kids can look forward to a healthier future.

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If You’re Not at the Table, You’re on the Menu

Nov 25, 2014, 11:03 AM, Posted by David Adler

A diabetes patient, Toni Martin, who participates in Pathways to Health a self management group.

I hear the phrase in the title used a lot when people talk about the important role advocacy plays in health policy-making, and it’s very appropriate. But there is one voice often missing in the conversation about how to fix the way we deliver, pay for, and think about health care: Consumers, the very people the system is designed to help. We must make sure that the people at the center of the health care system have a say in how it changes.

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Our Focus Might Change, but We’re Still Guided by Our Research

Nov 19, 2014, 1:47 PM, Posted by Alonzo L. Plough

A girl pictured at the bottom of a playground slide.

There is change afoot at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation as our entire organization reorients its focus to implementing our Culture of Health strategy. At the heart of this new approach is the belief that everyone—regardless of their ethnic, racial, geographic or socioeconomic circumstances—should have the means and the opportunity to lead the healthiest lives they can. Achieving a Culture of Health requires us to broaden the understanding that good health is far more than the absence of illness; where we work, where we live, what we eat, and where our children play and go to school fundamentally affect our ability to lead healthy lives.

Looking ahead, we see this new focus on building a Culture of Health as catalyzing a larger national movement toward real societal transformation—a chance to eliminate health disparities caused by social, environmental, and economic factors, and a powerful way to improve and advance public health. This is a big challenge for all of us, but there are significant pockets of progress around the country where a diverse range of activities is already driving such transformation.

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American Public Health Association Meeting: All About Where You Live

Nov 14, 2014, 9:55 AM, Posted by Linda Wright Moore

Children playing outside.

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) has long embraced the idea that advancing America’s health is a community affair. Much of our work—and our current vision for building a Culture of Health—is grounded on the basic premise that where we live, work, learn, and play is inextricably connected to our health and well-being.

Consider that life expectancy can differ by 25 years in neighborhoods just a few miles apart; that a ZIP code can determine rates of preventable disease, violence, and access to healthy food. With this in mind, RWJF supports a wide range of programs designed to foster healthy communities—including efforts to prevent obesity and chronic disease, reduce disparities in health and access to care, and improve early childhood development.

We recognize that the best strategies are driven by local data and address the unique challenges and characteristics of individual communities. We know that what works for Camden, N.J., might not fly in Minneapolis or Baltimore.

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Big (Box) Medicine?

Nov 6, 2014, 4:55 PM, Posted by Michael Painter

Items are mass produced in factory in China. Photo courtesy Cory M. Grenier, Creative Commons

Let’s see a show of hands. Who among us, doctor, nurse, patient, family member, wants to give or get health care inspired by a factory—Cheesecake or any other?

Anyone?

I didn’t think so.

True confession: I have never actually eaten at a Cheesecake Factory (hereinafter referred to as the Factory). My wife, Mary, and I did enter one once. We were returning from a summer driving vacation. Dinnertime arrived, and we found ourselves at a mall walking into a busy Factory.

It seemed popular. The wait was long—really long. We got our light-up-wait-for-your-table device. We perused the menu. There was a lot there. Portions seemed gigantic. We looked at each other and, almost without speaking, walked back to the hostess, returned our waiting device and left.

You got me—I cannot say 100 percent that I wouldn’t love Factory food. We were so close that one time!

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