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A New Innovation Award for Health Care Provider Training and Education

Nov 1, 2016, 9:00 AM, Posted by Jenny Bogard

Providers need to be equipped with the tools to help patients make healthy choices. That’s why the Alliance for Healthier Generation is recognizing innovative training programs providing nutrition, physical activity and obesity counseling education to their students.

Even at the young age of four, Luke was overweight. In fifth grade, he tried out for the baseball team, and although he made it, he struggled that season. He was slower than the other kids as he rounded the bases, and he started having knee pain from the extra weight on his joints. Luke and his family knew they had to do something. But they dreaded going to the doctor, knowing he’d get weighed and then have to confront the escalating numbers on the scale. Year after year, the same thing would happen, and they’d have the same discussion with his doctor when they finally worked up the nerve to go. But the weight never came off.

Apprehension about a visit to the doctor is something we all face, no matter our age or health. Who among us doesn’t get a little nervous before our annual visit, knowing we might face a difficult conversation about losing weight, or flossing more, or stopping smoking? These are things we all know, but have a hard time talking about.

And even worse, if we do have these important conversations, they can lead to feelings of shame and disappointment.

But the reality is that it’s not necessarily your doctor’s fault. Even with the hundreds of thousands of hours of education your doctor gets in classrooms and hospitals, most receive little to no training in how to talk to patients about making healthy choices. In fact, fewer than 30 percent of medical schools meet the minimum number of hours of education in nutrition and exercise recommended by the National Academy of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine.

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How a Swedish Model of Care is Making an Impact in the U.S.

Oct 5, 2016, 9:35 AM, Posted by Laura Leviton, Susan Mende

Disease registries designed to support clinical research can be reimagined to create a new and more effective kind of patient-centered care. Just take a look at Sweden.

The Karolinska Institutet building in Sweden. The Karolinksa Institutet in Solna, Sweden. Photo by Pelle Sten via Flickr.

Large-scale collection of patient data into disease-specific databases, or registries, is vital to research. These registries house standardized information on patients’ diagnoses, care, and outcomes, supporting large-scale comparison and analysis which can lead to better population health management and interventions. But can disease registries also help to move us closer to patient-centered care?

We’re learning from examples overseas that, with the help of new interactive technologies, they can.

Sweden created a disease registry for rheumatology that is much more than a data storage house. The Swedish Rheumatology Quality Registry (SRQ) is an interactive tool that helps patients and doctors prepare for and make better use of their office visits. It helps them to work like a team—to “co-produce” care together.

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Can Virtual Reality Make Us More Empathetic?

Jun 29, 2016, 2:00 PM, Posted by Deborah Bae

Virtual reality is proving to be a tool to help build the human capacity to care about the realities of others—something that’s needed to tackle social issues like homelessness.

A man tests out a virtual reality headset. Photo Credit: Maurizio Pesce/ Flickr via CC by 2.0

San Francisco media took the unprecedented step of putting aside competitive interests and devoted an entire day of coverage to the issue of homelessness in the Bay Area. Frustrated at inaction over the city's homeless crisis, local newsmakers have flooded the airwaves and filled pages of newsprint to focus attention on the problem and potential solutions.

Homelessness is not just something San Franciscans are struggling with. On any given night, over 1/2 million people in the U.S.—including children and families—are homeless, according to the National Alliance to End Homeless.

Tackling tough issues like homelessness requires empathy. Having empathy for those in need is a vital first step toward action. We’ve seen events that enable people to “walk a mile” in the shoes of a homeless person be effective at helping build understanding and compassion for the homeless. But what would it mean if people could walk a virtual mile in another’s shoes? Could the immersive nature of virtual reality help us reach more people and build lasting empathy?

Working with researchers at Stanford University, that’s exactly what we hope to find out.

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Innovations in Integrated Health

Nov 30, 2011, 12:28 AM, Posted by Pioneer Blog Team

BY DR. JASON HWANG, Executive Director of Healthcare, Innosight Institute

Jason Hwang, MD, MBA is an internal medicine physician and executive director of healthcare at Innosight Institute, a nonprofit social innovation think tank he co-founded with Harvard Business School professor Clayton Christensen, the world’s foremost authority on disruptive innovation. Through a grant from the Pioneer Portfolio, Dr. Hwang has worked to apply the principles of disruptive innovation to the health care delivery system. Disruptive innovations occur when new business or delivery models displace overly complex and costly, expertise-intensive models. Highlighting work from the Pioneer-funded studies, Dr. Hwang recently described the need for innovation in health care in a post on CNBC.com and was featured in a Human Ingenuity series on Forbes.com.

Why have select integrated health systems outpaced their peers across nearly all quality and cost measures? More than one year ago, Innosight Institute–a nonprofit think tank co-founded by innovation expert Professor Clayton Christensen of Harvard Business School –set out to answer this question by identifying the critical factors and decisions that led to successful, integrated health systems.

Our findings are documented in the paper "Disruptive Innovation in Integrated Care Delivery Systems," which is the culmination of research on seven different organizations representing a wide spectrum of health systems around the country. Major observations and findings include: 

  • Successful innovations that may be incorporated into today’s ongoing integration efforts, including mergers, accountable care organizations, and virtual assemblages being formed to participate in bundled payment programs and pay-for-performance contracts;
  • The importance of expanding the scopes of practice of various clinical staff, including nurse practitioners and physician assistants, to ensure access to quality care through disruptive delivery models;
  • Best practices in the use of electronic health records and health IT that should be implemented across all health systems as stimulus funds promote their widespread adoption.

Identifying these success factors is a crucial step forward in paving the way for similar organizations to be cultivated elsewhere and ensuring that one day every American will have access to high quality, affordable care.

Innosight Institute is also pleased to release its latest case study in conjunction with this project, which documents the experience of Sentara Healthcare in Virginia as it prepares for significant changes in how health care will be delivered and priced in the future. Pilots focusing on chronic disease management, bundled payments for procedures, and a patient-centered medical home are underway, yet Sentara is also acutely aware of the challenges these new delivery models pose to its successful, hospital-led health care system.

Not content with simply reacting to change, Sentara also created a test bed for wellness initiatives by targeting employee health with a program that includes a $500-per-employee rebate and has resulted in a return on investment of $6 for every $1 invested in the program. Meanwhile, the organization’s health plan, Optima Health, has sought to grow its consumer-directed, high-deductible health plans by first developing information and pricing tools for patients.

I invite you to read about Sentara and our other case study subjects: HealthPartners, Lancaster General Health, Presbyterian Healthcare Services, Group Health Cooperative, Grand Valley Health Plan, and Baystate Health (forthcoming).

Finally, I offer my special thanks to Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Pioneer Portfolio, whose financial support made this work possible.

This commentary originally appeared on the RWJF Pioneering Ideas blog.