Author Archives: Bob Atkins

Tackling Life Expectancy Gaps in New Jersey

Nov 9, 2016, 9:00 AM, Posted by Bob Atkins

New Jersey Health Initiatives is driven by five key principles for building empowered, equitable and healthier communities and narrowing the gaps in life expectancy across the state.

It’s a dismaying fact that we’re all familiar with: where you live has an enormous impact on your life expectancy. Indeed, some researchers now quip that your ZIP code may matter just as much, if not more, than your genetic code when it comes to your health. As one journalistic account put it, it’s “Death by Zip Code.”

New Jersey is no different. This summer, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF), together with Virginia Commonwealth University, published analyses of Mercer County, a prime place to showcase the impact of geography on health. It’s home to both affluent Princeton and economically strapped Trenton. And perhaps not surprisingly, life expectancy reflects the gulf in resources between the two towns. While a person born in Princeton can expect to live 87 years, his or her neighbor in Trenton has a life expectancy of 73 years—a staggering 14 year age gap across only a dozen miles.

These results are sobering. It’s easy to get despondent over them and locked into a narrative of failure and decline. But RWJF’s Culture of Health efforts involve cultivating potential, even in places where we wouldn’t normally think to find it. That’s where New Jersey Health Initiatives’ (NJHI) work comes in.

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A New Approach to a Healthier New Jersey

Aug 5, 2015, 4:49 PM, Posted by Bob Atkins

New Jersey Health Initiatives is investing in grassroots solutions to local health challenges in our own backyard, with 10 New Jersey communities serving as laboratories to learn what it will take to build a Culture of Health.

We’re trying a new approach to building a Culture of Health in communities across New Jersey. It’s a creative, grassroots, on-the-ground approach that could become a model for many other cities and towns across America.

For decades, folks in the health field have been working hard to turn around health inequities that mean some kids have a better chance of growing up healthy than others. They’ve done great work, but sometimes in isolation, and often making decisions based on best practices rather than authentic community engagement. Even more often, health organizations’ hands have been tied because the true causes of poor health sit in other sectors: poverty, unaffordable and poor quality housing, fractured or nonexistent transportation systems, and uneven quality education and access to jobs.

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