Now Viewing: Health Care Coverage and Access

Open Enrollment: One Step Closer to Coverage for All

Nov 2, 2015, 9:00 AM, Posted by John Lumpkin

Let’s build upon the success of the Affordable Care Act with this year’s open enrollment.

A pediatrician makes a home visit to check on an infant patient.

Open enrollment is here again—the annual opportunity for Americans to find and enroll in a health plan through HealthCare.gov or their state-based health insurance marketplace. In three short years, millions of Americans have gained access to health plans that cover important services like doctor’s visits, prescriptions, hospital stays, preventive care, and more. As a doctor, I’ve seen the difference health coverage can make in the lives of families. Quality, affordable health insurance means new access to care—care that can have a huge impact on health, equity, financial security, and a better quality of life. It moves us closer to a Culture of Health, where people can access care when they’re sick and when they’re well, making prevention the priority.

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Getting to the Essence of Value in Health Care

Aug 3, 2015, 1:57 PM, Posted by Susan Dentzer

In this era of value-based payment, we need to consider how different players within health care approach the value equation.

How would you judge the value of your health care? A longstanding definition of treatment holds that value is the health outcomes achieved for the dollars spent. Yet behind that seemingly simple formula lies much complexity.

Think about it: Calculating outcomes and costs for treating a short-term acute condition, such as a child’s strep throat, may be easy. But it’s far harder to pinpoint value in a long-term serious illness such as advanced cancer, in which both both the outcomes and costs of treating a given individual—let alone a population with a particular cancer—may be unknown for years. And then there’s the complicating issue of our individual preferences, since one person’s definition of a good outcome—say, another few years of life—may differ from another’s, who may be seeking a total cure.

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Expanding Opportunities for Rural Communities to Get Quality Care

Jun 9, 2015, 4:58 PM, Posted by Susan Hassmiller

Initiatives like the Future of Nursing and Project ECHO are expanding opportunities for more communities to get quality health care and lead healthier lives regardless of ZIP code.

Two children play in a toy tractor on a farm.

I read recently in The New York Times about Murlene Osburn, a cattle rancher and psychiatric nurse, who will finally be able to start seeing patients now that Nebraska has passed legislation enabling advanced practice nurses to practice without a doctor’s oversight.

Osburn earned her graduate degree to become a psychiatric nurse after becoming convinced of the need in her rural community, but she found it impossible to practice. That’s because a state law requiring advanced practice nurses to have a doctor’s approval before they performed tasks—tasks they were certified to do. The closest psychiatrist was seven hours away by car (thus the need for a psychiatric nurse), and he wanted to charge her $500 a month. She got discouraged and set aside her dream of helping her community.

I lived in Nebraska for seven years, and I know firsthand that many rural communities lack adequate health services. As a public health nurse supervisor responsible for the entire state, I regularly traveled to small, isolated communities. Some of these communities did not have a physician or dentist, let alone a psychiatric nurse. People are forced to drive long distances to attain care, and they often delay necessary medical treatment as a result—putting them at risk of becoming even sicker, with more complex medical conditions.

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Retail Clinics Are Expanding Their Role Within the Health Care System

May 6, 2015, 3:38 PM, Posted by Tara Oakman

With convenient weekend and after-hours care, retail clinics have the potential to expand access to basic primary care and help address some non-clinical needs underlying the social determinants of health.

A CVS Retail Clinic at the corner of a street.

My husband had been suffering from a very painful sore throat for a couple of days when he finally decided to call his doctor. Just one problem: It was a Friday morning and the office was booked for the day. The doctor called back later in the afternoon and told my husband it sounded like a virus and he should simply “wait it out.” With the weekend approaching, the next available appointment—if needed—was on Monday. Rather than suffer all weekend with a raw throat, my husband followed the advice of a relative (who also happens to be a physician) and went to a clinic at our local CVS. Less than an hour later he was diagnosed with strep throat and started on antibiotic therapy he picked up at the pharmacy. By Saturday evening he was feeling a lot better.

Access to quick, convenient care on nights and weekends is one of the prime selling points of “retail clinics” based in pharmacies, groceries, and big-box retailers. With longer operating hours and no need for an appointment, these clinics, sometimes called “doc-in-a-box,” give patients more flexibility to avoid time away from work and family. Plus, a trip to a retail clinic costs about one-third less than a visit to a doctor’s office, and is far cheaper than an emergency room. Retail clinics usually accept private insurance, Medicare, and, in many cases, Medicaid; yet people without insurance or a personal physician also are using them for treatment of routine illnesses, basic health screenings, and low-level acute problems like cuts, sprains, and rashes.

New shopping list: Pick up milk, breakfast cereal, and toilet paper; get a flu shot and that weird rash checked out.

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A Portrait of Women with Health Insurance

Feb 19, 2015, 2:21 PM, Posted by Susan Dentzer

For the second year running, more women than men have signed up for coverage in health insurance marketplaces during open enrollment under the Affordable Care Act. According to the Department of Health and Human Services, enrollment ran 56 percent female, 44 percent male, during last year’s open enrollment season; preliminary data from this year shows enrollment at 55 percent female, 45 percent male—a 10 percentage point difference.

What gives? An HHS spokeswoman says the department can’t explain most of the differential. Females make up about 51 percent of the U.S. population, but there is no real evidence that, prior to ACA implementation, they were disproportionately more likely to be uninsured than men—and in fact, some evidence indicates that they were less likely to be uninsured than males.

What is clear that many women were highly motivated to obtain coverage under the health reform law—most likely because they want it, and need it.

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Entering the Final Stretch

Feb 3, 2015, 6:15 PM, Posted by David Adler

A women looks at the 2015 Affordable Care Act ACA Enrollment Website.

As we head into the final weeks of this year’s open enrollment season, we can all be proud of the progress that’s been made. New numbers released last week show 9.5 million Americans signed up for health coverage through marketplaces across the country. Behind each number is someone who now has quality, affordable health coverage with access to health care when they need it and protection from financial ruin if they get sick.

But there are still millions more who are eligible for coverage this open enrollment period. RWJF and our partners are doing all we can to get as many people enrolled as possible before the February 15 deadline. These collective efforts focus on breaking down the biggest enrollment barriers for people to get covered. Our research shows that consumers are more motivated to enroll when they understand the benefits of coverage, believe they can afford the cost, and know they can find enrollment support to complete the process.

Enroll America, an RWJF grantee, is addressing the need for in-person help head on—operating grassroots efforts in 11 states and connecting consumers to enrollment tools and help nationwide. Their connector tool, allows consumers to schedule appointments for in-person help right away. Drawing from lessons learned from the first open enrollment period we know this one-on-one support will be critical for many consumers during these final weeks.

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Nurses Are Leading the Way to Better Health Care for Older Patients

Jan 21, 2015, 12:00 PM

Barbara Bricoli, MPA, is executive director of Nurses Improving Care for Healthsystem Elders (NICHE), an international program based at New York University’s College of Nursing that is designed to help improve the care of older adults. The program was developed by Terry Fulmer, PhD, RN, FAAN, chair of the National Advisory Committee for the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Executive Nurse Fellows program.

The rapid expansion of the aging population is a national concern. Nearly 20 percent of the U.S. population will be over age 65 by 2030, according to the U.S. Administration on Aging. And our aging population will place a heavy burden on our health care system; older adults, in fact, are hospitalized at three times the rate of the general population.

Yet health care providers lack adequate training in geriatrics and gerontology to care for older patients. Nurses Improving Care for Healthsystem Elders (NICHE) is working to change that.

Based at New York University’s College of Nursing, NICHE aims to better enable hospitals and health care facilities to meet the unique needs of older adults and embed evidence-based geriatric knowledge into health care practice. Hospitals and organizations that adopt NICHE report improved outcomes, decreased lengths of stay, better patient and staff satisfaction levels,  and higher success in building systemic capacity to effectively integrate and sustain evidence-based geriatric knowledge into practice.

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The Unfinished Work of the Affordable Care Act

Dec 12, 2014, 8:45 AM, Posted by Brendan Saloner

The United States is the last remaining rich country in the world where a large percentage of the population lacks health insurance coverage. This situation is being improved under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), with recent estimates showing that from early 2013 to mid-2014 the uninsured rate dropped from 19 percent of adults to 14 percent. The uninsured rate will no doubt continue to fall in 2015, but the problem of the uninsured will not go away with the ACA. It will not go away even if all 50 states expand Medicaid for poor adults, and will not go away if the U.S. Supreme Court rules against the plaintiffs in a pending challenge to the power of the administration to provide subsidies in the federally facilitated insurance exchanges.

In its 2012 baseline estimate, the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) projected that by 2022 the ACA might cut the number of uninsured by half, but would still leave behind 30 million people without insurance. This projection assumed full implementation of the ACA provisions. We don’t yet have a clear sense of how much larger that number will be with incomplete implementation of the core ACA coverage provisions, but even an optimistic assessment is that tens of millions of Americans will continue to spend periods of time without health insurance.

Who does the ACA leave behind? By design, the ACA excludes undocumented immigrants, a group that numbers around 11 million today. Some undocumented immigrants purchase private insurance, receive coverage from an employer, or participate in public programs funded with non-federal dollars, but the majority have no insurance. Undocumented immigrants are prohibited from enrolling in Medicaid, receiving subsidies, and purchasing coverage on the exchanges. Although President Obama recently signed an executive order protecting many undocumented immigrants from immediate deportation, the ACA exclusion will continue in the foreseeable future, barring an act of Congress. 

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RWJF Pioneering Ideas Podcast: Episode 6 | What if? Shifting Perspectives to Change the World

Oct 20, 2014, 9:00 AM, Posted by Pioneer Blog Team

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Welcome to the sixth episode of RWJF’s Pioneering Ideas podcast, where we explore cutting edge ideas and emerging trends that can help build a Culture of Health. Your host is Lori Melichar, director at the foundation.

Ideas Explored in This Episode

Sharing Health Care Providers’ Notes (3:08) OpenNotesTom Delbanco and Jan Walker talk with RWJF’s Emmy Ganos about why they decided getting health care providers to share their notes with patients was an essential innovation–and where their work is headed next. Here’s a hint: what if the  3 million patients who now have easy access to their clinician’s notes could co-write notes with their providers?

Rethinking How We Solve Poverty (18:46) – Kirsten Lodal, founder and CEO of LIFT, talks with RWJF’s Susan Mende and shares some simple ideas with the potential to revolutionize our approach to helping people achieve economic stability and well being. In a thought-provoking conversation, Lodal connects the dots between improving the well being of those living in poverty and building a Culture of Health.

A Historian’s Take on Building a Culture of Health (27:58) – Princeton historian Keith Wailoo and RWJF’s Steve Downs discuss how deeply held cultural narratives influence our perceptions of health, and how today’s “wild ideas” are often tomorrow’s cutting edge innovations.

Sound bites

...On opening up health care providers’ notes and what’s next:

“What I would like to do is spread the responsibility for health beyond the health care system. The health care system is good; I hope that it gets better, but there are so many other parts of our lives that contribute to our well being.” – Jan Walker, OpenNotes 

“It will be a very different world in the future. And we do think that OpenNotes is kind of giving people a peek into it. It's a first glimmer that this kind of transparency, this kind of approach to things, while it's passive now, it just opens up an enormous amount of possibilities for the future. And that's what really excites us.” – Tom Delbanco, OpenNotes

...On rethinking how we solve poverty:

“People's lives are like rivers... they flowed before coming into contact with us, and they will flow after having contact with us. And so the opportunity that we have, the privilege that we have is of most positively affecting the trajectory and the velocity of that flow. But if we forget that–if we get too swept up in having to own everything that happens in a person's life–then we won't build the best solutions, because we won't build solutions that provide people with the support they need to navigate the flow of that river over the long term.” – Kirsten Lodal, LIFT

...A historian’s take on building a Culture of Health: 

“Our concern with aggregate trends is an important one in tracing the shifting demographics of health in our country, but to understand what health actually means involves actually putting the data aside and thinking about lives and thinking about individuals and thinking about what these trends mean on an individual level.”– Keith Wailoo, Princeton University

Your Turn

Now that you’ve listened – talk about it! Did anything you heard today get you thinking in new ways about how you can help build a Culture of Health? Do you have a cutting-edge idea you’d like to discuss? Comment below or tweet at me at @lorimelichar, or consider submitting a proposal. Be sure to keep the conversation and explorations going at #RWJFpodcast.

Join the Conversation

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New Participants in RWJF Health & Society Scholars Program to Study Determinants of Population Health

May 16, 2014, 10:00 AM

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Health & Society Scholars program has announced the selection of 12 new scholars who will investigate how connections among biological, genetic, behavioral, social, economic, and environmental conditions impact the population’s health.

“We’re pleased to announce our newest class of Health & Society Scholars. These new scholars will continue to advance the program’s decade-long mission to answer the questions critical to guiding health policy and improving our nation’s health,” said Jo Ivey Boufford, MD, co-director with Christine Bachrach, PhD, of the national program office for the Health & Society Scholars program, and president of the New York Academy of Medicine.

The program seeks to improve the nation’s health by better understanding and acting on the determinants that can reduce population health disparities. Among many topics, the new scholars will study social factors underlying infectious disease transmission, as well as possible interventions designed to improve urban health. Previous cohorts of scholars have researched how health is influenced by civic engagement, discrimination, human happiness, work environment, public health policies, and many other societal factors.

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