Author Archives: Laura Leviton

A Successful Model That Predicts and Prevents Violence

Jun 18, 2018, 11:00 AM, Posted by George Hobor, Laura Leviton

A surgeon in Cardiff, Wales, who regularly treated victims of violence, discovered that many cases went unreported. He devised a model for collecting data and collaborating with both law enforcement and community to predict and prevent violence. This approach is now taking root here in the United States.

Cardiff image

Weekend after weekend, the wave of emergency department (ED) patients would arrive. Oral and maxillofacial surgeon Jonathan Shepard would treat shattered jaws, knife wounds and other facial injuries at the hospital in Cardiff, Wales. These injuries stemmed from brawls in bars and nightclubs where broken glasses and bottles were wielded as weapons. Strangely, Dr. Shepard found that only 23 percent of these assaults treated in the hospital were reported to law enforcement.

Harnessing the Power of Data for Violence Prevention

Determined to find a way to stem the violence, Dr. Shepard mobilized health care providers, law enforcement heads, city officials and other local leaders in working together to address what was happening within their community.

Local hospitals agreed to gather basic anonymized information from each assault victim admitted to the emergency department, including the specific location of the violent incident, time of day, and weapon involved. They removed patient identifiers and shared the anonymous data with local law enforcement officials, who combined those data with their own records.

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How a Swedish Model of Care is Making an Impact in the U.S.

Oct 5, 2016, 9:35 AM, Posted by Laura Leviton, Susan Mende

Disease registries designed to support clinical research can be reimagined to create a new and more effective kind of patient-centered care. Just take a look at Sweden.

The Karolinska Institutet building in Sweden. The Karolinksa Institutet in Solna, Sweden. Photo by Pelle Sten via Flickr.

Large-scale collection of patient data into disease-specific databases, or registries, is vital to research. These registries house standardized information on patients’ diagnoses, care, and outcomes, supporting large-scale comparison and analysis which can lead to better population health management and interventions. But can disease registries also help to move us closer to patient-centered care?

We’re learning from examples overseas that, with the help of new interactive technologies, they can.

Sweden created a disease registry for rheumatology that is much more than a data storage house. The Swedish Rheumatology Quality Registry (SRQ) is an interactive tool that helps patients and doctors prepare for and make better use of their office visits. It helps them to work like a team—to “co-produce” care together.

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Patient and Citizen Engagement for Health: Lessons from Jönköping County, Sweden

Aug 20, 2015, 12:00 PM, Posted by Galina Gheihman, Laura Leviton

What can a small Swedish county teach us about building a Culture of Health in the United States? We visited Sweden and brought back some valuable lessons on patient and citizen engagement.

Copyright Guillaume Baviere

Imagine a society where everyone has the means and opportunity to make choices that lead to the healthiest lives possible––a society where health is valued by all, and no one is excluded because of chronic illness or other limitations. This is what we call a Culture of Health, and it’s what, in collaboration with others, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation is working to build in the United States.

We know that to achieve this ambitious vision, we must look to––and learn from––promising approaches across industries, disciplines and geographic borders. This is why we recently visited Jönköping, a small county in south-central Sweden, where patient and citizen engagement has brought about remarkable results: kidney failure patients operate dialysis machines on their own schedule, complex patients—such as people with schizophrenia—actively participate in designing their own care and children’s preferences and experiences are listened to, so services can improve from the children’s point of view.

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