What’s the Airbnb for Health? Pioneering Ideas Podcast Episode 9

May 27, 2015, 4:47 PM, Posted by Lori Melichar

The rise of the sharing economy could surface new innovations in health and health care. The latest episode of the Pioneering Ideas Podcast explores this idea and more.

Could the ideas behind Airbnb — a service that lets people share their homes with strangers — transform health and health care?

Airbnb is just one example of a company that’s emerged as part of the sharing economy (also referred to as the “collaborative” or “peer” economy), an ecosystem of companies all over the world that are fueled by collaborative consumption:

Named by TIME as one of the “10 Ideas That Will Change the World”, collaborative consumption describes the shift in consumer values from ownership to access. Together, entire communities and cities around the world are using network technologies to do more with less by renting, lending, swapping, bartering, gifting and sharing products on a scale never before possible. From Airbnb to Zipcar to Taskrabbit, collaborative consumption is transforming business, consumerism and the way we live for a more fulfilling and sustainable quality of life.” – collaborativeconsumption.com

Rachel Botsman, an expert on the sharing economy whose TED talk on the subject has been viewed nearly a million times, recently visited the Foundation as part of our What’s Next Health series of conversations with pioneering thinkers. In an email to staff after her visit, she observed that, “to date, there has been a lack of dialogue and actionable insights on the potential to apply sharing/collaborative economy principles to different aspects of health.”

This is not to say that there aren’t examples of collaborative consumption addressing aspects of our lives that are related to health. Take the example Rachel shared with me of Landshare, a company in the United Kingdom that matches people who want to grow food with people who have the space for a garden. Imagine transforming vacant lots in some of the poorest areas of our country into places to grow fresh fruits and vegetables; the sustained effect on Americans’ health and wellbeing could be profound.

The founders of another company, Cohealo, observed that so much health care equipment sits idle for over half of its lifetime, accessible only to a finite group of professionals working in a single location. By encouraging sharing within and across facilities, Cohealo has the potential to decrease costs and waste.

Rachel joins us in the latest episode of our Pioneering Ideas podcast to explain the rise of the sharing economy and to brainstorm how new additions to the movement may help solve some of the thorniest challenges in health and health care. Could your company apply the sharing economy to the ongoing challenge of helping others lead healthier lives?  What are you willing to share to help build a culture of health in America?

Listen below or on iTunes – and, in the spirit of the episode, we hope you’ll share it, too, with anyone you know who’s passionate about building a Culture of Health.

More stories in this episode:

  • Reimagining Medical Education: Discover how emerging technologies and approaches are powering collaboration within and between medical schools;
  • Exploring Agile Science: Explore how “agile science” seeks to rapidly discover and test the most effective paths to healthy behavior change;
  • A Personal Essay on Personal Data: Learn why grantee Gary Wolf of Quantified Self believes access to our personal health data is essential to building a true Culture of Health.

After you listen, share your thoughts below, or join the conversation on Twitter at #RWJFPodcast. And if you have cutting-edge ideas to share about building a Culture of Health in this country, I hope you’ll reach out to me at @lorimelichar or consider submitting a proposal.

Be well.

Lori Melichar, a labor economist, is a director at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation where she focuses on discovering, exploring and learning from cutting edge ideas with the potential to help create a Culture of Health. Read her full bio.