Sprinting Toward Workplace Wellness

Dec 6, 2013, 2:25 PM, Posted by Ari Kramer

Graciela Ruiz

Lots of things can turn a person into a health and fitness nut. For many, it might be influence from friends, or a life episode that demonstrates the pitfalls of focusing too little on health.

For Graciela Ruiz, it was just a matter of landing a job at the right place.

When Ruiz started working at Wakefern Food Corp., the merchandizing and distribution arm for ShopRite and PriceRite stores, she was eating lots of processed foods, and exercise figured very little into her routine. She particularly hated running. “I wouldn’t run unless someone was chasing me,” she says.

One day, the organizer of Wakefern’s run/walk club signed her up for the Jersey Shore Relay Marathon. He gave her the race’s shortest leg, a 5K, and she trained hard and did better than expected. Fast forward five years, and Graciela is now highly active in the club and numerous other wellness programs at the company. She says she will “run for two hours and be happy about it,” and has changed her eating habits to a point where “I’ll eat vegetables all day long.”

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Engaging Patients in Research

Dec 3, 2013, 8:00 AM, Posted by Paul Tarini

What happens when you engage patients in research? That’s a question RWJF is exploring with grants to Sage Bionetworks and PatientsLikeMe to build online, open-source platforms that give patients the opportunity to contribute to and collaborate on research.

Sage Bionetworks’ BRIDGE platform will allow patients to share and track their health data and collaborate on research into diseases and health problems that matter most to them. Three research projects will be piloted on BRIDGE in the coming year, focusing on diabetes, Fanconi anemia and sleeping disorders.

PatientsLikeMe’s Open Research Exchange (ORE) will give researchers and patients a space to work together to develop health outcome measures that better reflect outcomes that are meaningful to patients. After several months building the ORE, PatientsLikeMe is now in testing mode, putting the platform through its paces. But it’s not just an academic exercise. PatientsLikeMe has recruited four researchers to pilot the ORE. These researchers will be providing feedback on the site while working with patients in the PatientsLikeMe network to develop and test an initial set of health outcome measures.

Sage Bionetwork’s Stephen Friend discusses collaboration between patients and researchers

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Think Safety as Thanksgiving—and Holiday Shopping—Approaches

Nov 27, 2013, 12:00 PM

file Photo Credit: tshein, via Flickr

Among the best pieces of advice people can look to today, the day before Thanksgiving, is a primer on safe food preparation from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, including a video on just how to stuff that turkey.

Additionally, when it comes to safety this holiday season, there are also ways to help keep yourself and your purchases safe as Thanksgiving morphs into Black Friday. Tech guru Shelly Palmer reported recently that, according to the New York City police department, 14 percent of crime in that city is linked to Apple computer products, while police in other cities note technology thefts of all kinds as the holiday shopping season gets into full swing. Apple is alerting buyers of the latest model iPhones that the devices now come with a security feature that requires a User ID and password to disable the "Find my Phone" feature, which helps police track down stolen phones. Tech experts say widespread use of the Apple feature can help deter theft--and possible harm--during a robbery.

Another thing to be aware of this shopping season, when people will be out and about on busy streets, is what's come to be known as the "Knockout Game," where the goal is knock a random person unconscious with a single punch. CNN and other news outlets have posted stories about reports of random violence in several U.S. and foreign cities, and at least one city is considering punishing juveniles found guilty of the attack as an adult rather than a child--which can mean years of jail time. However, The New York Times recently added its voice to the growing national discussion with a story questioning whether the "game" is in fact an urban myth, saying that it's possible these assaults are random acts of violence, and that even New York City police officials are still trying to determine the truth.

Nonetheless, while questions over the "game" remain, the assaults are very real. According to CNN, a police spokesman in Pittsburgh says people who appear distracted--such as those checking phones or listening to music through headphones--may be more vulnerable to attacks.

>>Bonus Link: The National Crime Prevention Council offers tips on safe holiday shopping, including shopping with a friend for added security.

This commentary originally appeared on the RWJF New Public Health blog.

National League for Nursing Aims to Bridge Gap Between Education and Practice

Nov 27, 2013, 12:00 PM

Beverly Malone, PhD, RN, FAAN, is chief executive officer of the National League for Nursing (NLN). She was recently elected to the Institute of Medicine. Last month, the NLN announced the launch of Accelerating to Practice, a new program designed to help new nurses move more seamlessly from education to practice. It is the inaugural program of the NLN's Center for Academic and Clinical Transitions.

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Human Capital Blog (HCB): Why is Accelerating to Practice needed?

Beverly Malone: We've always known that there is a difference between how nurse educators view graduates of nursing programs and how nursing directors view graduates. But we never knew how deep the divide was. A recent survey showed that 90 percent of educators thought that nurse graduates were doing just fine, but almost 90 percent of directors felt that nurse graduates did not have the skills that were needed to practice. That kind of a divide is not a small one. It has so much to do with how care is delivered, and the League felt compelled to do something about it.

HCB: What explains the divide?

Malone: We don't talk enough to one another. There are some exemplars out there where educators and administrators are on the same wavelength, and they have worked very hard to ensure that graduates are prepared in a way to move quality patient care forward. But overall, that's not the picture throughout the United States.

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What’s Next Health: The Motivation Bias

Nov 27, 2013, 7:00 AM, Posted by Pioneer Blog Team

Debra Joy Pérez, vice president for Knowledge Support at the Annie E. Casey Foundation Debra Joy Pérez, vice president for Knowledge Support at the Annie E. Casey Foundation

Each month, What’s Next Health talks with leading thinkers about the future of health and health care. Recently, we talked with BJ Fogg, director of the Stanford Persuasive Tech Lab, to discuss motivation versus ability, and to better understand which matters more in creating long-term change. In this post, Debra Joy Pérez, former assistant vice president for Research and Evaluation at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, who is now working with the Annie E. Casey Foundation, shares her impressions of BJ’s model and how it might impact the work of organizations like ours.

By Debra Joy Pérez

There is something magically simple in how BJ Fogg’s Behavioral Model addresses behavior change. When just three elements coincide—motivation, ability and a trigger—behavior change happens.

From my own experience, I can tell you that BJ’s model can work in developing new and healthy habits. I heard from BJ that immediately after he pees, he does push-ups. He is attaching a new habit he wants to create to an old habit he already has. Every time he relieves himself, he is triggered to perform a simple action that has him looking and feeling healthier. Like BJ, I wanted to improve my health (motivation)—specifically, I wanted to drink more water. My trigger was green tea. I drink a lot of it, so after each cup, I remember to fill the empty cup with water. I’m pleasantly surprised when I see that I’m nearing half a gallon by the middle of the day. It's working.

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A New Holiday Tradition—Tasty Recipes that are Healthy, Too

Nov 26, 2013, 5:01 PM, Posted by Catherine Arnst

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Thanksgiving is almost upon us, ushering in a month-long season of holiday parties, groaning boards of food, favorite family recipes, cookie swaps, and an extra five pounds around the waistline. Instead of just giving in to the excess and making January the month of dieting, perhaps we could make a few adjustments. I’ve asked around the Foundation staff for some healthy holiday recipes instead of the usual green bean casserole and cream-laden sides. Here are some tried and true alternatives, that are kid–friendly as well!

In fact, why not invite any children about the house (or adults who are still kids at heart) to help whip up some of these dishes. Children love to grate, stir, and shake, and the older ones will go at chopping with a vengeance. It’s never too early to teach them to cook, as discussed on this blog a few days ago.

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Staying in Shape on the Busiest Travel Day of the Year

Nov 26, 2013, 12:05 PM

file Baltimore Washington International Airport

The normally hectic pre-Thanksgiving travel day could be more frenzied than usual this year because of predicted storms in the west that could move east—and storms are often a precursor to flight delays. So why not use the extra time to get a jump start on 2014 resolutions?

Mindful that air passengers are captive audiences, many airports have added fitness options ranging from trail markers to let you know how far you’ve walked on the airport’s walking trail (Baltimore Washington International) to a yoga room (San Francisco International and Dallas Fort Worth) and even a full fitness center with workout clothes for rent (Toronto Pearson).

Airport Hotel Gyms

While most airports don’t yet have a gym right on the premises, a growing number of airports have hotels with attached gyms in one of the terminals, including Chicago O’Hare and Orlando International. (The hotels are located outside of the security areas, so if you’re planning a workout, build in the time you need to shower, dress and clear security before boarding your flight.) Passes to the airport gyms are typically under $20 per person. Check your airport’s website for hotels onsite, and then check the hotel to find out rates and rules for short term use. And remember to wear your sneakers to the airport so you’re sure you have them for the workout.

Airport Walking Trails

In addition to the walking trail at Baltimore Washington International, a growing number of airports have marked walking trails. Keep that in mind when you pack your carryon, as there aren’t usually storage facilities for luggage once you pass security, though for $39-50 you can get a day pass at many airline clubs where you can find a quiet corner, snacks and a place to store you hand luggage while you walk the indoor trail. Ask at the airport information desk where the trail begins, or check the American Heart Association walking path website or phone app, and put in “airport” for the search engine section marked “type of path.”

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Empathy and Appreciation for the Impact of the Social Determinants of Health

Nov 26, 2013, 11:00 AM, Posted by Gretchen Hammer

Gretchen Hammer, MPH, is executive director of the Colorado Coalition for the Medically Underserved. She works with local and state health care leaders and policy-makers to improve Colorado’s health care system.

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Healing is both an art and a science. On one hand, clinicians are intensely driven by the quantifiable, the measurable, and the evidence-based algorithms that lead to accurate diagnosis and treatment as well as allow us to develop new innovations in medicine. However, healing is also an art. Patients are not just a collection of systems that can be separated out and managed in isolation of the whole patient. Each patient and their family has a unique set of values, life experiences, and resources that influence their health and ability to heal. Recognizing the wholeness and uniqueness of each patient is where the art of healing begins.

Empathy is defined as “the ability to understand and share the feelings of another.” It takes presence of mind and time to be empathetic. For clinicians, finding the balance between the necessary detachment to allow for good clinical decision making and empathy can challenging.  This balance can be particularly difficult for students and new clinicians.

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“An Educated Consumer is Our Best Customer:” Four Things to Know About Transparency In Health Care Prices, Costs and Quality

Nov 26, 2013, 10:14 AM, Posted by Susan Dentzer

Watch our December 6, 2013, FirstFriday Google+ Hangout archive on transparency in health care.

Panic about high health insurance premiums. Fears about high-cost health-care providers being cut out of health plan networks. Worries that the health plans now available through health insurance exchanges won’t cover the care that patients need.

Welcome to the rollout of Obamacare....right?

Actually, with the exception of the new health insurance exchanges, all of the phenomena described above have a long history. Similar concerns were voiced loudly in the late 1980s and 1990s, when “managed care” in health insurance became a dominant force on the health care and health insurance landscape.

What’s amazing to people who lived through both of these eras—then and now—is how little has changed.  

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Monday Webinar to Address Diversity & Inclusion for Faculty Success

Nov 26, 2013, 9:00 AM

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) will host a webinar on Monday, December 2, to present insights and best practices in diversity and inclusion for faculty success at colleges and universities. Through a New Lens will feature a distinguished panel of speakers who discuss lessons and strategies they have developed from their own work in academia. They will share insights and ideas on grants/funding, career development, networking, mentoring, and work-life balance.

The webinar will be held from 2:30-4:00 pm EST. Advance registration is required.

Register for the webinar.

This commentary originally appeared on the RWJF Human Capital Blog. The views and opinions expressed here are those of the authors.