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What’s Working to Help Kids Across America Eat Healthy?

Mar 9, 2016, 9:00 AM, Posted by Tina Kauh, Victoria Brown

Healthy Eating Research expands its commitment to equity through a new funding opportunity that reserves awards for innovative studies focused on rural, American Indian and Asian/Pacific Islander populations.

Cute preschool girl with bright striped top drinks a carton of milk in a school setting.

The students at Native American Community Academy, a member of the Alliance for a Healthier Generation’s Healthy Schools Program, believed their school should serve healthy lunches that incorporated foods indigenous to the Navajo culture. So, they set out to turn their idea into a reality.

The students had an ultimate goal in mind: convince their principal to hire a company that would provide these healthier, more traditional meals. But, first, they had to prove that this type of food service could be done.

They started with the basics. With a budget of no more than $2 per person, students headed to a local grocery store and purchased ingredients for a meal they would prepare on their own and serve to their teachers and administrators to demonstrate that offering healthy Native American food at school is both feasible and affordable.

Their menu for the day: vegetarian chili with beans, blue corn meal mush (a traditional Navajo dish), an organic fruit cup and a dish they called the “Beez Kneez,” which had squash, corn, green chili, garlic and onions. The meal received rave reviews. Not only did the principal agree to find a new food service company, she put the students in charge of the task.

This is just one of many stories that reinforce the important role schools play in teaching kids about nutrition and offering healthy meals, snacks and drinks. Among kids in underserved communities (like the students at Native American Community Academy), the role of schools is especially critical.

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Reversing Childhood Obesity with a Novel Approach

Mar 8, 2016, 10:45 AM, Posted by Christina Economos

ChildObesity180 is bringing the best elements of private sector thinking and scientific research in order to improve the health of kids in America. Here's how.

Children playing outside in Claremont, CA. Photo courtesy Tufts University

In 2009 it became clear to me that if our nation were truly serious about reversing the childhood obesity epidemic, a novel approach was required. The numbers remain just too unacceptably high in all groups and troubling disparities persist.

Enter Peter Dolan, Chairman of Tufts University Board of Trustees and former Chief Executive Officer of Bristol-Myers Squibb with a long-time commitment to health.  His background made him a complement to our work at Tufts University Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy.  Along with Dr. Miriam Nelson, a professor of nutrition, we set out to develop a new method of addressing this complex problem, and co-founded ChildObesity180.

We created a collaborative model: bringing together nationally-renowned leaders from academia, nonprofits, business, and government (whom we refer to as Charter Members) to drive change on a national scale and substantially effect 5-to-12-year-olds across the country. We blend scientific rigor with insights from the private sector to develop, implement, evaluate and scale high-impact obesity prevention initiatives. 

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Wanted: Global Ideas for a Healthier U.S.

Mar 1, 2016, 9:00 AM, Posted by Nicole Bronzan

Throughout its history, the U.S. has enthusiastically adopted some of the best ideas and innovations from other countries. It’s time to do the same for health.

Global Ideas for U.S. Solutions social image. Good ideas have no borders.

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Revitalizing Newark in a Healthy Way

Feb 24, 2016, 10:00 AM, Posted by Catherine Arnst

An ambitious collaborative effort is revitalizing a long-struggling city in ways that promote not only economic growth, but health and wellness. 

Skyline of Downtown Newark Arthur Paxton/Wikimedia Commons

“Jobs in Newark, New Jersey are as rare as dinosaurs,” says Barbara LaCue. She should know—the 51-year-old Newark resident was unemployed for more than five years after being laid off in 2008 from a steady factory job. She ended up living in a homeless shelter with her two sons.

Then, last October that dinosaur showed up. It took the form of a 67,000 square foot ShopRite, the first full service supermarket to serve the 25,000 people in the city’s struggling University Heights neighborhood.

ShopRite took over a site that had been vacant since the infamous Newark Riots in 1967. It is in a neighborhood where the poverty rate ranges between 25 and 40 percent, and half the households do not have access to a car. ShopRite is the anchor tenant of Springfield Avenue Market, a planned $91 million dollar retail and housing development funded in part by The Reinvestment Fund, with support from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

But to Barbara, what matters most are the 350 full and part-time jobs the store created, most of them filled by people from the community. She is a chef at the deli counter, and she sees the job as more than just a living—it is a creative outlet. Barbara makes a mac n’ cheese to die for, and there are few people who can claim to love their job as much as she does hers. “This store is the best. I love this store.”

Her colleague Donald Douglas, also a lifelong Newark resident, works in the produce section. No one in Newark wanted to hire people from the neighborhood before Shoprite came along, says Donald. “Now, this is my supermarket. We all greet people with a smile here, because we are part of the community.”

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Four Enduring Life Lessons from a Career in Public Health

Feb 17, 2016, 10:30 AM, Posted by Najaf Ahmad

New York City’s new deputy mayor for health and human services shares how inspirational mentors and rich experiences have cultivated her career.

Herminia Palacio speaks at the RWJF Scholars Forum 2014.

She was abruptly awakened by a phone call at 5:00 in the morning as Hurricane Katrina was ravaging New Orleans. Evacuees were fleeing the devastation and arriving in Houston by the tens of thousands to escape. Herminia Palacio was then the executive director of Houston’s Harris County Public Health and Environmental Services. She had until 11:00 p.m. to figure out how to care for them.

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Change Leaders: A New Network, Engaging Every Sector, to Build a Culture of Health

Feb 12, 2016, 10:00 AM, Posted by Pam S. Dickson

RWJF is opening applications for new programs that support the development of diverse health care leaders as well as leaders from other sectors who can help build health into our communities and the nation as a whole.

 

Attendees sit in the audience at The Science of Placebo conference.

Few things inspire me like the challenge to build a Culture of Health in America. But success depends on the skills and creativity of our leaders—their ability to influence, inspire and lead in a rapidly changing world. Many of these leaders must also be part of those communities with limited resources and opportunities, if we are to tackle the pernicious effects of racism, poverty and inequity. They must represent every sector and discipline, recognizing that health is influenced by complex social factors beyond health care. These leaders have to abandon status quo, silos and their assumptions, and create a new reality.

This is the opportunity before us as we open applications for new Advancing Change Leadership programs on February 22. It continues our decades of work to support the development and diversity of health care leaders, and expands our investment to leaders from other sectors who have the passion, ingenuity and influence required to build health into our communities and nation as a whole. We are profoundly excited by the idea of a diverse network of dedicated leaders committed to equity and better health. Imagine how they will approach their work, cultivate the next generations of leaders, and accelerate the journey toward a Culture of Health!

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All Children Deserve to Grow Up at a Healthy Weight

Feb 8, 2016, 9:15 AM, Posted by Risa Lavizzo-Mourey

A year since RWJF committed $500 million toward reversing childhood obesity, early signs of progress show us that cross-sector partnerships and access to healthier options are key steps to ensure all children have opportunities to grow up at a healthy weight.

A teacher leads students in outdoor physical activity at Cleminson Elementary School in El Monte, California.

One year ago, I traveled to New York City to announce that the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation would commit $500 million toward the goal of helping all children grow up at a healthy weight by 2025, bringing our total investment on this issue to more than $1 billion.

The gym at West Side High was packed and brimming with excitement on announcement day. We cheered early signs of progress in places like Philadelphia, New York City and rural North Carolina, but all of us knew the job wasn’t done. Even in places reporting good news, progress usually wasn’t reaching low income families and communities of color equitably. Everyone agreed we had to push harder, both to accelerate the pace of progress and ensure that its benefits reached all our children.

Now it’s one year later, and I’m pleased to report that the optimism we felt proved justified.

Nationally, research shows that school lunches have improved, and both students and parents support the healthy changes. Physical education is now due for a major upgrade, thanks to new funding sources in the just-passed education law that replaced “No Child Left Behind.”

The latest numbers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s NHANES study confirm that we are on the right track. Obesity rates are down five percentage points among our youngest children and are holding steady among other age groups. 

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The Next Phase of the OpenNotes Movement

Feb 2, 2016, 10:49 AM, Posted by Susan Mende

What happens when patients gain access to the notes their doctors and nurses take during a visit? A culture shift with empowered and motivated patients at the center.

Medical professions looking at patient records.

In December I was proud to announce an exciting partnership with three other foundations—the Cambia Health Foundation, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, and the Peterson Center on Healthcare—to take a bold step to expand access to clinical notes written by doctors, nurses, and other clinicians to 50 million patients nationwide. The $10 million in new funding to OpenNotes will allow the initiative to dramatically step up its efforts to create a new standard of care and set a new bar for patient-centeredness.

We know that physicians can help their patients become more engaged in their own care, and that this kind of patient activation can lead to improved outcomes and lower health care costs. Of course, that is easier said than done—especially when clinicians are already under pressure to adopt new technologies, implement new models for delivering health care, and make data on the quality of their care publicly available.

Health care innovators are unrelenting in their search for simple, scalable solutions to help both clinicians and consumers—and philanthropists can help put these bright ideas to the test to determine what works. OpenNotes is one such solution.

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What Can Communities Do Now for Health Equity?

Jan 28, 2016, 1:21 PM, Posted by Joe Marx

The Culture of Health Prize communities demonstrate that there's no single formula to address health equity locally, but there are key lessons we can all learn from their success.

2015 RWJF Culture of Health Prize video

Our annual RWJF Culture of Health Prize honors and elevates communities across the United States that are making great strides in their journey toward better health. 

A scan of the 2015 winners reveals something we’ve seen in previous years: There is no single blueprint. Even when solving common problems, these Prize communities innovate in their own ways. Each brings fresh ideas to the forefront and offers a unique perspective on how to holistically address our nation’s most complex health issues. So it makes sense to turn to them to answer the question that is at the heart of our work today: How can communities come together to create places where health can happen – for everyone?

We ask that question a lot and sometimes our answers can be pretty lofty: work together across sectors, think about health broadly, and so on. While all true, communities looking to take action sometimes ask us to, well, be a bit more specific. What can we do tomorrow? Where do we start

Here, we dive in to look at how the 2015 Culture of Health communities approached that Prize-winning question. 

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Beyond Seat Belts and Bike Helmets: Policies that Improve Lives

Jan 27, 2016, 9:13 AM, Posted by Alonzo L. Plough

RWJF announces up to $1.5 million in new funding to create the evidence base needed for a new generation of policies that improve health, well-being and equity.

Needed: Research to inform laws and policies that elevate community health and equity.

Some of us remember the bad old days when nobody wore seat belts and babies bounced on their mothers’ laps in the front seats of cars. For others, it’s the stuff of legend. Since the advent of seat belt laws in the late 1980’s, the proportion of people buckling up has skyrocketed from fewer than 15 percent to over 90 percent in many states. The laws required people to change their behavior initially and continuously until buckling up was a habit of mind and a social norm. Accordingly, the number of deaths and serious injuries from car accidents has plummeted by more than half.  Other policies—including minimum wage laws, zoning and urban planning, or childcare regulations and guidelines—have had large effects on improving population health.

At the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF), we have witnessed firsthand the impact that policies and laws can have in improving health. With this in mind, RWJF is launching Policy for Action (P4A). This new initiative provides up to $1.5 million in funding (or $250K in individual grants up to two years) for research efforts that identify policies, laws and regulations in the public and private sectors that support building a Culture of Health. Our focus is intentionally wide-ranging. We recognize that policies developed both within health and prevention sectors and beyond—in education, economics, transportation, justice, and housing, for example—can ultimately affect the ability of all Americans to lead healthy lives.

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