Author Archives: Katherine Hempstead

New Effort Will Give Researchers Access to Valuable Health Datasets

Apr 24, 2017, 9:00 AM, Posted by Katherine Hempstead

A new program is providing research teams with $750,000 in funding and access to rich health data. In doing so, we're hoping to create opportunities for researchers to use this data to inform policy and improve systems.

Many of us track health data without even thinking about it. With our step counters, fitness tracker apps, and “smart” watches, we collect thousands of points of data about ourselves—data we hope to use to make us healthier and more fit (or motivate ourselves to work harder). Now think about all the data health care providers and insurance companies track. That data, if put together and de-identified to protect privacy, could help researchers spot health trends in certain geographic areas. That data could help researchers see if there are linkages between people with chronic conditions and what type of health plans they choose.

Now, imagine you know about a library of health data, but it’s locked in a room that is in a building that costs money to enter, requires legal negotiation, and is not organized for researchers to use.

For many researchers, this analogy is more real than you think. Many valuable health datasets are actually this elusive. Proprietary datasets may be hard to obtain due to cost, or have technical/systems requirements that make it difficult for researchers to access and actually use.  

View full post

How Health Insurers Can Help Kids Reach a Healthy Weight

Jun 1, 2016, 12:30 PM, Posted by Katherine Hempstead, Victoria Brown

Innovative approaches in health insurance can help support youth development and prevent chronic diseases.

While research shows that access to safe neighborhood spaces for physical activity along with affordable healthy foods help families and kids maintain a healthy weight, it’s often not enough.

Health care economist Mike Bertaut illustrated this reality through a deeply personal and passionate post last month. He opened up about his lifelong struggle with obesity and shared some important lessons about how the health care sector can help children maintain a healthy weight. It’s a moving piece worth reading.

As Mike shows us, health care providers—and health insurers—have a critical role to play, especially for children and families at highest risk for obesity and obesity-related disease.

View full post

SHOP: Can it Boost Health Coverage for Small Business Employees?

Dec 14, 2015, 6:04 PM, Posted by Katherine Hempstead

A new report shows that small business owners care about the health insurance coverage they offer their employees, yet the Small Business Health Option Program (SHOP) remains an untapped resource with the potential to help employers find affordable plans.

In 1942, Ken Wilson’s grandfather started Bonnie Brae Conoco, a full-service gas station and neighborhood garage in Denver. Today, Ken is the third generation to manage the business. They’ve offered their employees health insurance since 1970, paying 100 percent of the costs for those who work full-time. Although it’s their largest expense, the Wilsons believe offering coverage is essential. They want to take care of their employees and attract and retain the best people.  

Small businesses, like all businesses, have struggled to keep up with the rising cost of health insurance. But unlike larger companies that can leverage their purchasing power to negotiate lower premiums and more comprehensive benefits, small businesses often have a choice of costlier plans with skimpier benefits. A recent study found small firms are far less likely than larger firms to offer health coverage. In 2012 and 2013, the percentage of small employers offering health insurance was 35 percent, while the percentage of large employers offering insurance was 95.8 percent.  

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) has several implications for small businesses. Under the ACA, small business health plans are subject to the marketplace regulations similar to those in the individual market. Depending on the state in which the business is located and the characteristics of the work force, these changes could make premiums change a lot or a little. Many small businesses are still offering pre-ACA plans, and many of them will need to transition to ACA-compliant coverage in 2017.

One new opportunity is the Small Business Health Options Program or SHOP, which is an online marketplace where small business owners with 50 or fewer full-time employees can purchase health insurance for their workers. Features of SHOP attempt to provide flexibility for both employers and employees. Business owners can set their contribution and their employees can choose the plan and benefits they want. Small business owners with 25 or fewer full-time employees can also qualify for a tax credit to put toward the cost of coverage.

View full post

Big East Leads Going into March Madness

Mar 26, 2014, 8:57 AM, Posted by Katherine Hempstead

Because every state has approached health reform differently, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) provides us with a unique opportunity to observe federalism in action. We now have 51 unique environments in which to assess the implementation of health reform.

Given the magnitude of the policy intervention, this variation provokes great interest in understanding the state’s role in health reform, and in disentangling policy and governance factors from other state characteristics.

A new report from the University of Pennsylvania’s Leonard Davis Institute looks at Marketplace enrollment and state exchange characteristics, and shows that states that created their own exchange have enrolled a higher percent of their eligible population in Marketplace plans than states that had the federal government partly or completely manage their exchange.

View full post