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Author Archives: Emmy Ganos

Seeking Insights From Partnerships that Advance Health

Mar 21, 2016, 12:00 PM, Posted by Emmy Ganos

A new survey aims to reveal how communities across the nation are using collaboration to safeguard health.

Healthier Communities

The health and well-being of a community is far too complex to be the responsibility of the health care sector alone. New Hampshire’s Greater Monadnock region has figured that out. Their Council for a Healthier Community is working with local organizations, businesses, community leaders, and citizens to make this region the healthiest community in the nation by 2020. As part of that ambitious goal, the coalition is exploring a Living Wage campaign, since income and health are inextricably linked. Healthy Monadnock has enrolled employers in the cause, and is encouraging residents to patronize those companies and organizations who support a living wage.

The Greater Monadnock region is just one example of the growing number of cross sector collaborations emerging across the nation, in which the health care sector is just one player on a larger stage. In these collaborations businesses, government agencies, community groups, and schools work together with traditional health care institutions to build a Culture of Health for all, no matter where they live, work, learn, or play.

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Is More Always Better? Not Necessarily When It Comes to Health Care

Oct 19, 2015, 8:00 AM, Posted by Emmy Ganos, Tara Oakman

Health care professionals, patients, and allies across the nation are banding together to promote an understanding of what good medical care can and should be with RightCare Action Week.

Red buttons display the motto, "Right Care Right Now."

Sometimes, more is definitely better. Getting that extra hour of sleep can greatly benefit your mind, body and day. Cars that get more miles per gallon are cheaper and cleaner to run. And who would argue against more vacation time?

But when it comes to health care, more is not always better. Unnecessary diagnostic tests, treatments or hospitalizations can drive up health care costs, and in some cases, actually harm patients. For example, excess imaging increases exposure to radiation. Overuse of screening and diagnostic tests can lead to stressful false positives. And unnecessary treatments, drugs or procedures increase the risk of serious complications. In the larger picture, the estimated $200 billion spent on inappropriate care each year diverts resources away from services that are actually needed both within and outside of the health system—in mental health, housing, and infrastructure, for example—that can help all Americans lead healthier lives.  

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How Data Will Help Me Keep My Resolution

Jan 27, 2015, 10:54 AM, Posted by Emmy Ganos

Pioneering the Use of Personal Health Data

It's a brand new year and like many Americans, I'm thinking about New Year’s resolutions—specifically, fitness and exercise resolutions. People who know me well know how I feel about working out (Hint: I don't like it. Or do it). But I have lots of good reasons for wanting to start. I turned 30 this year, so I’m starting to age out of that Young Invincible demographic (#GetCovered), and realizing that I am, in fact, “vincible.” As I get older, and watch my parents age, it's starting to hit home that getting to a particular shape or size really isn't the point. The point is getting my heart and body in the best shape I possibly can.

So this year, New Year’s resolution time feels a little different. And as I start thinking about making some changes, I’m reflecting back over the last two Data for Health listening sessions I attended in Charleston and San Francisco. As a result, I’ve decided that it’s time to think about setting my New Year’s resolutions in an entirely different way--by using data.

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Doing More Means Doing Less: Young Innovators Lead the Charge

Jul 23, 2014, 1:28 PM, Posted by Emmy Ganos

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Here at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, we often talk about the idea of making the healthy choice the easy choice. To many of us, that means putting the cookies in a high cabinet, and putting the fruit on the counter. But when I think about building a Culture of Health in America, and especially within our health care system, making the healthy choice the easy choice means so much more.

In health care, often the healthy choice actually means doing less—fewer invasive tests and less dependence on medication—and instead watchfully waiting or making healthy lifestyle changes. But it’s not always easy to show a patient that you care when you only have a few minutes to spend together, and ordering a test or prescribing a medication is a simple way to show “I’m doing something to help you.” The trouble is, those tests, procedures and treatments often don't help, and sometimes they can hurt.

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