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A New Nutrition Research Center Set on Making New Jersey a Healthier State

Nov 23, 2015, 11:39 AM, Posted by Peter Gillies

The New Jersey Institute for Food, Nutrition, and Health is impressive both in size as well as in its plans to help transform New Jersey into a national model for promoting healthier lifestyles for children and families.

Last month, Rutgers University opened the doors to the New Jersey Institute for Food, Nutrition, and Health (IFNH), a new interdisciplinary research hub for scholars, policymakers, students, and parents to advance, educate and promote issues of nutrition and wellness. At the dedication ceremony, I couldn’t help but think of something the great Chicago architect Daniel Burnham once said:

“Make no little plans.”

It’s no surprise that an architect would come to mind as I sat proudly marveling in the atrium of our magnificent new home. The modern, open-concept building is a beautiful addition to the Rutgers campus, designed with nearly 70,000 square feet of research and community space dedicated to making New Jersey a healthier and happier state. It’s also a heartening testament to the support we enjoy from organizations like the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF), which calls on all of us to work together to build a Culture of Health, where getting healthy and staying healthy are guiding values.

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New Partners, New Ways of Thinking: Supporting “Change Leadership” to Build a Healthier Nation

Nov 19, 2015, 1:17 PM, Posted by Herminia Palacio

Building a Culture of Health requires supporting and connecting leaders who can drive change by tolerating risk and seeking inspiration through collaboration.

Audience members listen during a presentation

Building a Culture of Health isn’t easy. It may seem obvious, but think about it: Our nation didn’t develop its current Culture of Unhealth overnight. Reversing it won’t happen quickly, either. As John Lumpkin pointed out recently, paraphrasing Albert Einstein: “You cannot fix problems with the same logic you used in creating them.”

That’s why change leadership is so important.

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Do-It-Yourself Health: How the Maker Movement is Innovating Health Care

Nov 16, 2015, 11:14 AM, Posted by Anna Young

MakerNurse is changing the game for nurses by tapping into their natural problem-solving skills and bringing the spirit of invention, creativity, and innovation into medical settings.

MakerNurse invention Debra Flynn shows off the prototype of the shower sleeve she designed at the first medical maker space.

Anyone who has spent time in a hospital knows that—more often than not—nurses are the professionals who catch the little problems with your care: the uncomfortable IV tube, the bandage that doesn’t quite fit, the pill bottle that’s hard to open.

Nurses are natural problem solvers. They cut down bandages to fit preemies. They fashion a plastic cup around an IV site to stop it from snagging clothes. They roll up two hospital blankets and wrap them in tape to make a “cough pillow”—something to clutch against your stomach to ease the pain of laughing or coughing after abdominal surgery. These DIY medical devices are made by nurses every day in hospitals.

Nurses are uniquely positioned to spot such problems. So, why not encourage nurses to continue devising their own solutions, then give them the tools to create them?

With MakerNurse, that’s exactly what we’re doing.

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Measuring What Matters: Introducing a New Action Framework

Nov 11, 2015, 11:30 AM, Posted by Alonzo L. Plough

It's time to change our culture into one that values health everywhere, for everyone. Introducing a new Action Framework and Measures to help us get there.

Where communities can flourish and individuals thrive.

Our nation is at a critical moment. There is plenty of data that reveals discouraging health trends: We are living shorter, sicker lives. One in five of us live in neighborhoods with high rates of crime, pollution, inadequate housing, lack of jobs, and limited access to nutritious food.

But there is other data that gives us glimpses of an optimistic future. There’s increasing evidence that demonstrates how we can become a healthier, more equitable society. It requires a shared vision, hard work, and the tenacity of many, but we know it is possible.

Starting with a Vision

Last year, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) shared our vision of a country where we strive together to build a Culture of Health and, every person has an equal opportunity to live the healthiest life they can—regardless of where they may live, how much they earn, or the color of their skin.

As my colleagues and I traveled throughout the country, we met many of you and heard your views on an integrated, comprehensive approach to health. You told us that in order to achieve lasting change, the nation cannot continue doing more of the same. Realizing a new vision for a healthy population will require different sectors to come together in innovative ways to solve interconnected problems. 

A First Friday Google+Hangout discussion on "Measuring What Matters in Building a Culture of Health" took place on Friday, November 6

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Disrupting the Status Quo: Seeking Innovations from Low-Resource Communities

Nov 4, 2015, 3:03 PM, Posted by Catherine Arnst

A call for proposals seeks to support evaluation of disruptive innovations that improve the health of low-resource communities—without increasing costs.

Brownsville Belden Community Garden

Many of the resources that influence whether or not people are healthy vary widely from one community to the next. Income, education and employment levels, access to quality, affordable health care, the availability of social services, and the cultural and physical environment—all have a significant impact on health outcomes. Poorer communities, lacking in resources may struggle to offer all the components that create a healthy environment to live, learn, work and play.

By necessity, however, these low-resource communities often find new and creative ways to do more with less to promote health.  In an effort to uncover such fresh and disruptive approaches to improving health in these communities, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) is issuing a call for proposals.

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Open Enrollment: One Step Closer to Coverage for All

Nov 2, 2015, 9:00 AM, Posted by John Lumpkin

Let’s build upon the success of the Affordable Care Act with this year’s open enrollment.

A pediatrician makes a house visit to check on an infant patient.

Open enrollment is here again—the annual opportunity for Americans to find and enroll in a health plan through HealthCare.gov or their state-based health insurance marketplace. In three short years, millions of Americans have gained access to health plans that cover important services like doctor’s visits, prescriptions, hospital stays, preventive care, and more. As a doctor, I’ve seen the difference health coverage can make in the lives of families. Quality, affordable health insurance means new access to care—care that can have a huge impact on health, equity, financial security, and a better quality of life. It moves us closer to a Culture of Health, where people can access care when they’re sick and when they’re well, making prevention the priority.

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What Right Care Means to Me: The Physician’s View

Oct 21, 2015, 1:11 PM, Posted by Kathleen Grimm, Vikas Saini

Two physicians describe how they are mobilizing patients, providers and others, to change the culture of overuse in health care, to one that is individualized, compassionate and just.

Two doctors standing in a corridor consult together over some paperwork.

The end of life can be fraught with emotion and excruciating decisions for families. It is a time when overuse of treatments and interventions occurs far too frequently. The culture of medicine teaches physicians to “do everything you can” to keep patients alive, with an underlying message that more is better when it comes to treatments and interventions. For doctors, patients and their families, making the decision to refuse extraordinary measures can feel like giving up.

As physicians who are active in the Lown Institute’s RightCare Alliance, we are dedicated to changing this culture. We know that a range of practices persist as standards that don’t improve the length or quality of life. Overuse and inappropriate care are baked into how we do things to the point that they are almost invisible. From frequent blood draws in the hospital to unneeded imaging for a normal pregnancy and futile chemotherapy in end-stage cancer, our goal is to keep patients safe from unnecessary diagnosis, treatment, and ultimately, harm. We think that it is critical to combine an understanding of the true benefits and risks of procedures and therapies with a respect for a patient’s wishes. Such a thoughtful approach that individualizes care, promotes doing more for the patient and less to the patient.

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Is More Always Better? Not Necessarily When It Comes to Health Care

Oct 19, 2015, 8:00 AM, Posted by Emmy Ganos, Tara Oakman

Health care professionals, patients, and allies across the nation are banding together to promote an understanding of what good medical care can and should be with RightCare Action Week.

Red buttons display the motto, "Right Care Right Now."

Sometimes, more is definitely better. Getting that extra hour of sleep can greatly benefit your mind, body and day. Cars that get more miles per gallon are cheaper and cleaner to run. And who would argue against more vacation time?

But when it comes to health care, more is not always better. Unnecessary diagnostic tests, treatments or hospitalizations can drive up health care costs, and in some cases, actually harm patients. For example, excess imaging increases exposure to radiation. Overuse of screening and diagnostic tests can lead to stressful false positives. And unnecessary treatments, drugs or procedures increase the risk of serious complications. In the larger picture, the estimated $200 billion spent on inappropriate care each year diverts resources away from services that are actually needed both within and outside of the health system—in mental health, housing, and infrastructure, for example—that can help all Americans lead healthier lives.  

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Why Nursing is Key to a Culture of Health

Oct 9, 2015, 1:38 PM, Posted by Susan Dentzer

Nurses taking blood pressure

If a Culture of Health means recognizing health’s central importance in our lives, then nurses can be among that culture’s leading ambassadors. More often than not nurses are fully immersed in their patients’ lives, and there are case studies throughout the nation of nurses using that involvement to guide patients in innovative ways to better health.

Consider Stephen and Sandra Sheller 11th Street Family Health Services, a nurse-led Philadelphia clinic serving residents of four low-income public housing projects. Their health center was created in direct response to residents’ requests, and includes not just primary care, but also mental and behavioral health, dental health, and couples and family therapists. There’s a small urban farm producing fruits and vegetables, and a “teaching kitchen” where residents can learn healthy cooking techniques.

At the 11th Street Clinic, nurse-led teams carefully consider each patient’s unique needs. “We don’t ask, ‘What’s wrong with this person?’,“ the clinic’s founder, public health nurse Patricia Gerrity, said at a recent Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Google+Hangout. “We ask, ‘What’s happened to this person?“ that could affect his or her health.

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How Public Health Sharing Arrangements Fit Into the Value Equation

Oct 6, 2015, 11:05 AM, Posted by Meshie Knight

In recent years, cross-jurisdictional sharing has been a focus for policymakers and public health officials wishing to increase effectiveness and efficiency in the delivery of public health services. Measuring its impact is next.

public health nursing banner

Well-functioning, high-value public health departments are critically important to ensuring the conditions for good health in communities. In recent years, however, health departments have been faced with exceptional financial challenges mostly in the form of repeated reductions in state and local funding for public health budgets. At the same time, expectations for their roles and responsibilities—as monitors and chief health strategists for communities and as partners within and beyond the health sector—are growing.

In 2012, RWJF launched a program to investigate a potential strategy for strengthening health departments that could be especially effective in times of financial or administrative hardship, and importantly, could also help to augment the capabilities of health departments serving particularly small or rural jurisdictions: cross-jurisdictional sharing (or more simply, publicly authorized sharing of public health services across jurisdictions). The Center for Sharing Public Health Services (CSPHS) was designed to help build the evidence for how cross-jurisdictional sharing (CJS) arrangements can be planned for and implemented in different environments.

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