Body Mass Index and Early Kidney Function Decline in Young Adults

A Longitudinal Analysis of the CARDIA (Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults) Study
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Among a cohort of young adults with glomerular filtration at study baseline, the connection between Body Mass Index (BMI) and kidney function decline requires a need for successful obesity prevention measures early in life.

The Issue:

Significant morbidity and mortality is associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD). This study looks at the association between obesity and CKD in younger populations, specifically comparing BMI with kidney function decline, in an effort to understand kidney disease and improve health.

Key Findings

  • Mean age of study participants was 35.1 years and mean BMI at baseline was 27.2.

  • Increasing BMI was associated significantly with lower kidney functioning over the 10-year study period.

  • Higher BMI categories were associated with a higher likelihood of rapid kidney function decline.

Conclusion:

Kidney functioning has a widespread effect on health. This study demonstrates that, among a cohort of young adults with glomerular filtration at study baseline, the connection between BMI and kidney function decline requires a need for successful obesity prevention measures early in life. The study is limited by the inability to describe kidney function before differences by BMI category were already evident.

About the Study:

This longitudinal cohort study included 2,839 Black and White young adults with cystatin C-based estimated glomerular filtration rate greater than 90ml/min/1.73m2 participating in the year-10 (1995-1996) examination of the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study.