Role of African-American Providers in Health Reform Examined

Volume on health policy for an African-American public policy journal
    • January 27, 2003

From 1998 to 2001, the Harvard Journal of African American Public Policy produced a theme issue dedicated to health and health policy issues that affect African-American communities. The journal also sponsored a conference focused on this topic in 1999.

In addition, journal staff completed a three-year strategic plan for expanding the journal's subscriber base.

The Harvard Journal of African American Public Policy, founded at Harvard University's John F. Kennedy School of Government in 1989, is a student-run, nonpartisan publication dedicated to promoting discourse on health, social, political and economic issues affecting African-American communities.

Key Results

  • The Harvard Journal of African American Public Policy produced a theme issue dedicated to health and health policy issues that affect African-American communities. It was published in 1999.

    The journal's theme issue, "Health and the Black Community," examines the role of African-American medical practitioners and health care providers in health care reform; access to health and dental care in African-American communities; and the impact of AIDS on the black community, among other topics.
  • A conference based on the issue, entitled "Health and the Black Community," took place on May 1, 1999, in Cambridge, Mass. Attendees included students, Harvard alumni, practitioners, academics and politicians.
  • As part of its three-year strategic plan for expanding the journal's subscriber base, journal staff members:
    • Began publishing the journal annually in 1999 (by comparison, only three volumes were published from 1992 to 1998).
    • Worked to more actively engage its 11-member Executive Advisory Board.
    • Improved the journal's organizational structure.
    • Formed working committees to focus on management, production, finance and marketing.
    • Prepared and mailed 500 brochures, described the journal in the Kennedy School's alumni magazine.
    • Participated in a reciprocal advertising program with other Harvard journals.

    Approximately 350 copies of each journal issue have been distributed, nearly 100 through paid subscriptions. Marketing efforts to increase distribution continue.