Discrimination in America: Solutions for Health

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation hosted a forum on community-driven solutions to discrimination in America at the Newseum in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday, January 16, from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. Eastern.

Watch the event recording:

Join Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) President and CEO Richard Besser on Tuesday, January 16. In a series of conversations with the audience, researchers and community leaders will unpack data from our recent national poll, in partnership with the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and National Public Radio, and discuss how they are addressing discrimination in housing, education and policing and promoting health equity in their communities.
 

Agenda Overview

9:00 a.m.—Noon, With Networking Lunch to Follow

  • Remarks by Richard Besser, MD, president and CEO of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
  • Panel 1: A conversation of leaders: How do we use this data to move toward solutions to root out discrimination? Where should we be focusing efforts?
    Moderated by Dwayne Proctor, PhD, senior adviser to the President and director, RWJF
  • Panel 2: How are communities coming together to solve these problems?
    Moderated by Maria Hinojosa, president and founder, the Futuro Media Group
  • Closing: Changing systems, policies and practices
  • Noon-1 p.m.: Networking lunch

Follow the conversation—and ask your questions on Twitter—with hashtag #PromoteHealthEquity.

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