Project ECHO

Moving Knowledge, Not People

Project ECHO connects specialists with on-the-ground practitioners to bridge health gaps in rural communities.

Project ECHO uses ongoing telementoring to equip primary care practitioners in rural areas with the knowledge they need to provide high-quality specialty care.

Created by Sanjeev Arora, MD, a social entrepreneur and liver disease specialist at the University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center in Albuquerque, Project ECHO is a nationally—and globally—recognized model for bringing best-practice health care to patients who can’t get it because of where they live. The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation began funding Project ECHO in 2009. In the U.S. alone, 175 ECHO hubs reach thousands of communities across 46 states. Around the world, Project ECHO programs operate in 34 countries.

Project ECHO uses a hub-and-spoke telementoring model to move knowledge instead of people. By participating in weekly virtual clinics with teams of specialist mentors, primary care practitioners in rural and underserved areas acquire the expertise they need to treat patient with complex health problems—including Hepatitis C, HIV, chronic pain, opioid addiction, mental illness, diabetes, and cancer. 

Project ECHO
echo.unm.edu

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The Project ECHO model for lifelong medical learning and collaborative practice is helping to build a Culture of Health by linking primary care clinicians with specialist care teams, to deliver quality treatment to patients with complex, chronic disease.

The Project ECHO model for lifelong medical learning and collaborative practice is helping to build a Culture of Health by linking primary care clinicians with specialist care teams, to deliver quality treatment to patients with complex, chronic disease.

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