Project ECHO

Transforming how medical knowledge can be shared and translated into everyday practice.

Project ECHO uses a telehealth model to bridge the gap in health care for rural and underserved communities.

Founded and directed by Sanjeev Arora, MD, distinguished professor of medicine at the University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center in Albuquerque, it links primary care clinicians with specialists through real-time learning made possible by inexpensive videoconferencing technology.

Funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation since 2009, the program's novel approach allows physicians, nurse practitioners, and other clinicians to jointly manage complex illness and promotes the use of best practices in care, while enabling patients to receive treatment in their home communities.

Project ECHO initially trained primary care clinicians to treat patients with hepatitis C. Since then, teleECHO clinics have broadened to address HIV, chronic pain, mental illness, complex care, endocrinology, and other common, costly health issues. The model is being replicated at dozens of academic medical centers, community health centers, military health centers, prisons, and other types of host sites across the country and around the world.

Project ECHO
echo.unm.edu

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The Project ECHO model for lifelong medical learning and collaborative practice is helping to build a Culture of Health by linking primary care clinicians with specialist care teams, to deliver quality treatment to patients with complex, chronic disease.

The Project ECHO model for lifelong medical learning and collaborative practice is helping to build a Culture of Health by linking primary care clinicians with specialist care teams, to deliver quality treatment to patients with complex, chronic disease.

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