Adverse Childhood Experiences

Children who experience trauma, such as neglect or physical, verbal, or sexual abuse, can suffer health and social consequences long into adulthood. Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are linked to mental illness, chronic health conditions, and premature death. The physical, social, and economic environment in which children live, and the shared societal values on health and well-being, can contribute to whether or not children are exposed to these negative events.

The National Survey of Children’s Health data showed that, in the 2017-2018 school year, 42% of children in the U.S. had one or more ACEs, such as family divorce, domestic violence, or drug or alcohol use problems in the household, a finding unchanged from the prior school year, representing a 3% reduction from the last reported year of 2016-2017. A decrease in this percentage of ACEs may indicate a reduction in the number of children experiencing these events—which may stem from improved life conditions and household environments of both children and their families.

SOURCE: Combined National Survey of Children’s Health, Health Resources and Services Administration, 2017-2018

  • PERCENT OF U.S. CHILDREN (0-17) WHO HAVE HAD ONE OR MORE ADVERSE CHILDHOOD EXPERIENCES (ACEs), IN 2018

  • PERCENT OF U.S. CHILDREN (0-17) WHO HAVE HAD ONE OR MORE ADVERSE CHILDHOOD EXPERIENCES (ACEs), BY AGE and YEAR

  • PERCENT OF U.S. CHILDREN (0-17) WHO HAVE HAD ONE OR MORE ADVERSE CHILDHOOD EXPERIENCES (ACEs), BY RACE/ETHNICITY and YEAR

Disability-Adjusted Life Years Related to Chronic Disease

A large and growing number of people in America suffer from one or more chronic diseases. Measuring the impact and burden of chronic disease—and monitoring the disparities that exist—highlights whether all individuals are able to live the healthiest life possible.

Using data from the Global Burden of Disease study, in 2017, the total disability-adjusted life years (DALYs, or years lost due to poor health, disability, or early death) for the top 10 chronic conditions in the United States was estimated to be 32,103,228 years. Since 2000, the total number of DALYs for top 10 chronic conditions has steadily increased by about 4.6 million DALYs, which suggests that that people in the U.S. with these conditions may require more or better support to manage their chronic conditions. A decrease in this number would signal that more people are better managing their chronic conditions—potentially living longer and free from disability.

SOURCE: The Global Burden of Disease, Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, 2000, 2005, 2010 and 2015, 2017

  • NUMBER OF DISABILITY-ADJUSTED LIFE YEARS IN U.S., BY TOP TEN CHRONIC DISEASES