Improving Population Health: Making Sure Patients—and Not Just Doctors—Are Accountable

Nov 5, 2014, 12:09 PM

Several heart disease associations—including the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology—have released a report that calls on patients to take responsibility for following doctor’s orders when it comes to improving heart heath. The report authors say that while performance measures for improvements in heart disease have traditionally been doctor-focused, patient actions are also needed.

Those actions can include:

  • Following treatment plans
  • Taking medications as prescribed
  • Going to follow-up appointments
  • Maintaining lifestyle changes such as weight loss and regular exercise

The report calls on doctors to facilitate shared goal setting; shared decision making; and shared care planning and monitoring with their patients. It also pushes doctors to look at not just short-term measures, but long-term goals for patients and how they do on those goals.

One example from the report is tracking how well a patient adheres to a medication regimen—not just whether a drug was prescribed—and whether the prescribed treatment actually achieved its goal, such as lowering blood pressure or preventing a subsequent heart attack.

The goal of performance measurement is to improve patient outcomes, including improving the patient’s health status, and reducing their morbidity and mortality. Therefore, it is important to engage everyone that can have an impact on these goals including patients, family members or caregivers, clinicians, and the healthcare system,” said Eric D. Peterson, MD, MPH, director at the Duke Clinical Research Institute and writing committee co-chair. “Shared-accountability performance measures explicitly acknowledge these interdependencies so that everyone can work together towards the improved health of the patient.”

This commentary originally appeared on the RWJF New Public Health blog.