Can Idea Sharing Among CEOs Improve Health and Bring Down Health Care Costs?

Sep 17, 2014, 2:19 PM

The Bipartisan Policy Center (BPC) in Washington, D.C., and nine CEOs from leading U.S. companies issued a report yesterday that lays out their ideas for improving individual and community health while reducing health care costs. The report, Building Better Health: Innovative Strategies from America's Business Leaders, shares strategies from all the companies and makes several recommendations:

  • Implement and track the outcomes of corporate health and wellness programs
  • Collaborate on the implementation of community-based programs
  • Improve the health care system by supporting the movement toward transparency and payment and delivery models that are based on outcomes rather than on volume

The CEOs are members of the BPC’s CEO Council and collectively employ more than one million people and provide coverage for over 150 million people. Council participants include McKinsey & Company, Aetna, Johnson & Johnson, The Coca-Cola Company, Verizon Communications, Bank of America, Blue Cross Blue Shield Association and Walgreens Co.

In addition to the report, the council released an interactive website with examples of initiatives the companies have taken to improve individual and community health. Some examples also improve the corporations’ bottom lines, such as Verizon’s partnerships with university research centers to test wireless health monitors that individuals or companies can download and buy through the technology company. However, David Erickson, director of the Center for Community Development Investments at the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, points out that no for-profit company can afford the investments required for improving public health without also being able to see an impact on their own bottom line. Examples include increased sales and greater efficiencies in delivering health care.

For example, Walgreens has increased its share of flu shots given from fewer than one million in 2009 to more than seven million in 2013. While that represents improved income for the company, Walgreens—which has stores within three miles of 63 percent of Americans, 75 percent of African-Americans and 78 percent of Latinos—has also worked with state and federal health officials to publicize and increase immunization initiatives. It has also worked with many third-party payers so that patients are often fully or largely covered for the vaccines, with little or no copayment required. Retail clinics such as those at many Walgreen stores also often improve on current health care delivery, such as being open 365 days a year, unlike most doctors’ offices.

This commentary originally appeared on the RWJF New Public Health blog.