An Expanded Role for Nurses in Chronic-Condition Care

Aug 26, 2014, 12:00 PM

As health reform increases access to care for people with chronic conditions at a time when the supply of primary care physicians is decreasing, one viable alternative is nurse-managed protocols for outpatient treatment of adults with diabetes, high blood pressure and high cholesterol, according to a study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

The research team reviewed 18 studies on the effectiveness of registered nurses (RNs) in leading the management of those three chronic conditions. In all 18 studies, nurses could adjust medication dosage; and in 11 studies, they could independently start patients on new medications. The review showed that patients with nurse-managed care had improved A1C levels, lower blood pressure and steeper reductions in LDL cholesterol.

“The implementation of a patient-centered medical home model will play a critical role in reconfiguring team-based care and will expand the responsibilities of team members,” the researchers wrote. “As the largest health care workforce group, nurses are in an ideal position to collaborate with other team members in the delivery of more accessible and effective chronic disease care.”

Read the study, Effects of Nurse-Managed Protocols in the Outpatient Management of Adults With Chronic Conditions.

This commentary originally appeared on the RWJF Human Capital Blog. The views and opinions expressed here are those of the authors.