Author Archives: Daniel Howard

An APHA Presentation: Addressing Racial Health Disparities with Culturally Competent Interventions Delivered from the African American Church

Oct 30, 2012, 9:00 AM, Posted by Daniel Howard

By Daniel L. Howard, PhD, executive director of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Center for Health Policy at Meharry Medical College. The Center’s mission is to provide leadership in health policy education, research and reform, while improving the health and health care of underserved communities. This post is part of a series in which RWJF scholars, fellows and alumni who are attending the American Public Health Association annual meeting reflect on the experience.

Daniel Howard

This week, I am part of a team that had the honor of being chosen to conduct a presentation on mental health in African American faith-based communities at the 140th Annual Meeting and Exposition for the American Public Health Association (APHA).  This is a significant topic for clinicians, researchers and policy-makers to consider when addressing mental health needs for African American individuals and their communities.

The Surgeon General’s Report Supplement (2001) noted that science can offer effective treatments for most disorders.  However, it noted, “Americans do not share equally in the best that science has to offer.” Numerous others researchers have concluded that publicly provided behavioral health services must be improved for ethnic minorities.

Research has consistently shown that, despite significant prevalence of mental health issues in the United States, most individuals do not seek treatment for these issues. Historically, research has shown that African Americans are even less likely to seek mental health treatment than their Caucasian counterparts. There are several reasons for this that are not exclusive to, but do include, the stigma that surrounds mental health in African American communities, the perceptions of mental health in African American communities, and the limited mental health resources available to address mental health needs in the community.

Despite the indication that the majority of mental health service needs for African Americans are unmet, there has been a strong and consistent response from the African American church to serve as the surrogate for the medical sector. Many published studies have found that African American churches have strong potential to serve as a highly effective gateway for the successful delivery of health intervention. The compatibility between health and wellness and African American churches, and particularly between mental health wellness and African American churches, can be attributed to several factors including the church’s consistent tradition of supporting its members and the inherent emphasis on the healing of psychological ills.

View full post

New Census Report Signals Need for Change in Health Care Workforce

May 30, 2012, 1:00 PM, Posted by Daniel Howard

By Daniel L. Howard, PhD, executive director of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Center for Health Policy at Meharry Medical College. The Center’s mission is to provide leadership in health policy education, research and reform, while improving the health and health care of underserved communities.

file

On May 17th, the U. S. Census reported a dramatic and historic shift in the nation’s demographics. For the first time, babies born from multicultural groups—African Americans, Hispanics, Asians, and others—comprise the majority of new births in the United States. This trend indicates that the nation will soon transform from a white-majority-dominated population of approximately 85 percent, just a generation ago, to a minority-majority-dominated country.

The population shift also has great implications for the nation’s overall health. The groups that will soon make up the majority of our citizens suffer from significant health care disparities by almost every indicator—access, quality of care and health status.

The New America

In the 1950’s, the U. S. Census reported that whites were roughly 90 percent of the population, while Blacks were 10 percent. In the 1970’s, whites were approximately 84 percent of the population, Blacks 11 percent, and Hispanics 5 percent. By 1990, whites were less than 79 percent and Blacks and Hispanics were 12 percent and 9 percent, respectively.

As of 2011, African Americans, Hispanics, Asians and other minority groups account for 50.4 percent of births, 49.7 percent of all children under five years old and slightly more than half of the 4 million children under one year old. A key reason is that a greater share of the minority population is of child-bearing age. Striking median age differences exist between races; Hispanics (27.6) and whites (42.3) are on either end of this spectrum, while African Americans (30.9) and Asians (33.2) are in between.

Yet, we live in a country where, “African Americans live sicker and die younger than any other group of Americans,” according to noted medical sociologist Thomas LaVeist, PhD, director of the Hopkins Center for Health Disparities Solutions at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. And many other diverse groups struggle to obtain needed care and manage a range of chronic health problems—a situation that greatly contributes to national health care costs and underscores the need for health care policies and institutions capable of addressing health disparities.

View full post