December 2007

Grant Results

SUMMARY

The Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids organized and hosted a two-day national meeting October 19–20, 2006, to raise awareness of the need for tobacco prevention funding and to create strategies to make the most of available funds.

Key Results

  • Some 80 tobacco control advocates and 71 tobacco prevention and cessation program managers attended the meeting. Representatives from national partner organizations also attended.
  • Attendees received a CD-ROM that contained seven advocacy tools, designed to help promote funding for tobacco control programs and keep the issue alive for the public and policy makers.

Funding
The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) provided $140,000 to support this project from October 2006 to March 2007.

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THE PROBLEM

The 1998 State Tobacco Settlement provided money to almost every state to fund comprehensive tobacco use prevention and cessation programs (for more information, see Appendix 1). However, according to the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, just three states and territories involved in the settlement have used the money to fund tobacco prevention and cessation programs at the minimum levels that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends.

With additional bonus settlement payments scheduled for distribution starting in 2008 (almost $1 billion per year for 10 years), the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids wanted to make sure this money would be used for tobacco prevention and cessation efforts.

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THE PROJECT

The Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids is a nonprofit organization devoted to reducing tobacco use and its consequences. Staff organized the national meeting with advocates and program managers to spark interest, share ideas and to create a tangible plan to raise awareness of the need to increase funding for tobacco prevention and cessation programs.

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RESULTS

Project staff reported the following results to RWJF:

  • Some 80 tobacco control advocates and 71 tobacco prevention and cessation program managers from around the country attended a two-day meeting, October 19–20, 2006, in Atlanta. Representatives from national partner organizations also attended.
  • The Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids distributed a CD-ROM with seven tools to help participants promote tobacco control and cessation programs. For more information on the CD-ROM, see Appendix 2.

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AFTER THE GRANT

The campaign's preliminary report on tobacco prevention and cessation programs for fiscal year 2008 projects that states will spend $120 million more on tobacco prevention and cessation programs in fiscal year 2008 than they did in fiscal year 2007.

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GRANT DETAILS & CONTACT INFORMATION

Project

Raising Awareness of the Need for Tobacco Prevention Funding and Strategizing on Moving the Issue Forward

Grantee

Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids (Washington,  DC)

  • Amount: $ 140,000
    Dates: October 2006 to March 2007
    ID#:  059058

Contact

Daniel E. McGoldrick
(202) 296-5469
dmcgoldrick@tobaccofreekids.org

Web Site

http://www.tobaccofreekids.org/reports/settlementbonus

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APPENDICES


Appendix 1

The 1998 State Tobacco Settlement

The 1998 State Tobacco Settlement, a landmark agreement between tobacco companies and 46 states, the District of Columbia and the U.S. territories, placed restrictions on how the tobacco industry can advertise and promote its products, particularly to children and adolescents.

The settlement called for the tobacco companies to provide nearly $246 billion over the first 25 years to participating states. States were to use a significant portion of this money to fund tobacco prevention and cessation programs. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommended minimum levels that each state should spend to promote these tobacco-free campaigns.

Since 2000, the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids has reported on the states' progress in using state funds to raise awareness of the health problems posed by tobacco use. In 2002, state officials spent a combined $750 million on tobacco cessation and prevention programs — the most spent in one year but less than half of the $1.6 billion minimum the CDC recommended.

In fiscal year 2007, the organization reported that:

  • Only three states — Maine, Delaware and Colorado — funded tobacco prevention programs at CDC minimum levels.
  • Some 28 states and the District of Columbia spent less than half the CDC minimum.
  • Five states — Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, New Hampshire and Tennessee — provided no significant state funding for tobacco prevention during the fiscal year.

In 2008, settlement bonus payments totaling almost $1 billion per year for 10 years are available to participating states. This gives the states another opportunity to adequately fund tobacco prevention programs, according to Daniel E. McGoldrick, vice president of research for the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids.


Appendix 2

Second Chance (Mulligan) for States to Fund Tobacco Prevention: CD-ROM with Seven Tools

The CD-ROM Second Chance (Mulligan) for States to Fund Tobacco Prevention, contains seven tools, previously created by the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, to help advocates and program managers promote tobacco control and cessation programs.

  • A document with key questions for state advocates to answer when developing a plan to seek additional funding for tobacco prevention and cessation programs.
  • A communications toolkit, including sample op-ed articles, letters to the editor, advertisement copy and more.
  • A PowerPoint® presentation: "Why States Should Fund Tobacco Prevention and Cessation Programs."
  • A PowerPoint® presentation: "Holding the Industry Accountable."
  • Model legislation to illustrate how to use excess settlement payments to fund comprehensive programs.
  • A public opinion survey poll, designed to gauge the public's awareness of the 1998 State Tobacco Settlement and how states spent the money.
  • A fact sheet: "Comprehensive Tobacco Prevention and Cessation Programs Effectively Reduce Tobacco Use."

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BIBLIOGRAPHY

(Current as of date of this report; as provided by grantee organization; not verified by RWJF; items not available from RWJF.)

Audio-Visuals and Computer Software

Second Chance (Mulligan) for States to Fund Tobacco Prevention, a CD-ROM with seven tools to help advocates and program managers promote tobacco control and cessation programs. Washington: The Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, 2006.

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Report prepared by: Margaret O. Kirk
Reviewed by: Kelsey Menehan
Reviewed by: Molly McKaughan
Program Officer: Michelle A. Larkin

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