October 2008

Grant Results

SUMMARY

From 2005 to 2008, staff of the State University of New York at Stony Brook prepared materials about the university's health science bachelor's degree program model, disseminated them to other academic health centers and provided technical assistance to centers interested in adopting the model. The health science program has 13 areas of concentration (seven nonclinical and six clinical) that are offered or suspended based on workforce needs; see Appendix 1 for a list.

Key Results

  • Project staff produced a manual (Allied Health Education: A Model for Addressing National Workforce Shortages) and a CD (by the same title) about the health science bachelor's degree program and disseminated them to 200 academic health centers.
  • To further disseminate the model, project staff made presentations to 10 academic health centers and professional organizations.
  • Four universities adapted/adopted aspects of the model during the grant period:
    • Excelsior College School of Health Sciences in Albany, N.Y.
    • The University of Louisiana in Monroe
    • The University of North Texas in Dallas
    • The University of South Florida in Tampa

Funding
The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) supported the project with a $97,492 unsolicited grant.

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THE PROBLEM

Severe workforce shortages in the allied health professions and the increasing complexity of health care have created a need for more workers with appropriate education, according to staff at the State University of New York at Stony Brook's School of Health Technology and Management.

Since 2000, the university has offered a bachelor's degree in health science tied directly to the workforce. It has 13 areas of concentration (seven nonclinical and six clinical) that are offered or suspended based on workforce needs; see Appendix 1 for a list. Students enrolled in the clinical concentrations complete their classroom education and then do their clinical training.

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RWJF STRATEGY

The RWJF Building Human Capital program team is focused on preparing health professionals for leadership, enhancing the skills and careers of frontline health workers, training scholars to conduct health policy research and encouraging youth to pursue health careers. It aims to boost the diversity of people working in health and health care to serve better the health needs of a demographically and culturally changing America.

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THE PROJECT

From 2005 to 2008, staff from the State University of New York at Stony Brook prepared materials about the university's health science bachelor's degree program and disseminated them to other academic health centers. Project staff provided technical assistance to staff at academic health centers who were interested in using the education model.

Project staff had planned to convene regional meetings with staff from interested institutions. However, after learning that institutions preferred to proceed on an individual basis because they did not want to talk about programs in the presence of competitors, staff worked individually with institutions.

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RESULTS

Project staff reported the following results to RWJF:

  • Project staff produced a manual and a CD about the health science bachelor's degree program and disseminated them to 200 academic health centers culled from a membership list of the Association of Schools of Allied Health Professionals:
    • The manual, Allied Health Education: A Model for Addressing National Workforce Shortages, outlined the structure of and rationale for the health science major, including the curriculum, objectives, policies and procedures.
    • The CD (by the same title) includes the more than 70 health science course syllabi; technical standards, policies and procedures for the various professions; student handbooks for the clinical concentrations; and a university-wide self-study conducted at the State University of New York at Stony Brook to gauge student experience at the university (this study was not conducted under the grant). The CD is not available online.
  • Staff also surveyed the 200 institutions by mail, asking them to rate the materials; 100 institutions responded:
    • The institutions were satisfied that the materials contained all the information needed to adapt/adopt the health science major model.
    • However, they were reluctant to consider adapting/adopting the health science major because the program challenged the "conventional wisdom" of many institutions that classroom education and clinical training should be offered together rather than sequentially.
  • To further disseminate the model, project staff made presentations to 10 academic health centers and professional organizations (see Appendix 2). The project director reported that these meetings established dialogue with the institutions and organizations, which represented specific professions, and helped reduce resistance to the health sciences major.
  • Four universities adapted/adopted aspects of the model during the grant period:
    • Excelsior College School of Health Sciences, Albany, N.Y.
    • The University of Louisiana, Monroe
    • The University of North Texas, Dallas
    • The University of South Florida, Tampa
    Excelsior College and the University of Louisiana adapted the nonclinical courses as part of a health science degree program. The University of North Texas in Dallas and the University of South Florida adapted the nonclinical courses and were considering launching degree programs.

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AFTER THE GRANT

Project staff posted the manual from this project on the health science major's Web site. Staff continues to send the CD to universities, upon request, and responds to their questions. The project director continues to provide technical assistance to Excelsior College. The staff is developing two new areas of concentration in the health science major: sonography and research project manager (to assist doctors conducting research).

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GRANT DETAILS & CONTACT INFORMATION

Project

National Dissemination of a Model Program to Increase Interest in the Health Professions

Grantee

The Research Foundation, State University of New York (Albany,  NY)

  • Amount: $ 97,492
    Dates: September 2005 to November 2007
    ID#:  053143

Contact

Deborah Zelizer, L.C.S.W.
(631) 444-6158
Deborah.Zelizer@stonybrook.edu

Web Site

http://www.hsc.stonybrook.edu/shtm/bshs/brochures/RWJAlliedHealthEducation.pdf
http://www.hsc.stonybrook.edu/shtm/bshs/index.cfm

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APPENDICES


Appendix 1

Areas of Concentration in the State University of New York Health Science Major

Nonclinical Concentrations (course of study is four years)

  • Disability Studies
  • Environmental Health
  • Health Care Informatics
  • Health Care Management
  • Medical Billing and Coding
  • Pharmacy Technician
  • Public Health/Community Health Education

Clinical Concentrations (course of study requires a fifth year at Stony Brook Hospital)

  • Anesthesiology Technology
  • Emergency and Disaster Management
  • Medical Dosimetry
  • Nuclear Medicine Technology
  • Radiation Therapy
  • Radiologic Technology


Appendix 2

Presentations About the State University of New York at Stony Brook Health Science Major Model

Institutions

  • Excelsior College School of Health Sciences, Albany, N.Y.
  • Mayo Clinic, College of Medicine, Rochester, Minn.
  • University of Louisiana, Monroe
  • University of North Texas, Dallas
  • University of South Florida, Tampa (two presentations)

Associations

  • American Association for Clinical Chemistry
  • Association of Educators in Radiologic Technology of New York State (annual meeting)
  • Association of Schools of Allied Health Professions (annual meeting)
  • Commission of Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (annual meeting)
  • Joint Conference of the American Society of Radiologic Technologists and the Association of Educators in Imaging and Radiologic Sciences

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BIBLIOGRAPHY

(Current as of date of this report; as provided by grantee organization; not verified by RWJF; items not available from RWJF.)

Reports

Allied Health Education: A Model for Addressing National Workforce Shortages (a manual). Stony Brook, N.Y.: Stony Brook University Health Sciences Center, August 2006. Available online.

Audio-Visuals and Computer Software

Allied Health Education: A Model for Addressing National Workforce Shortages, a CD with course syllabi, standards, policies and procedures and more. Stony Brook, N.Y.: Stony Brook University Health Sciences Center, August 2006.

Survey Instruments

"Allied Health Education: A Model for Addressing National Workforce Shortages. Dissemination Survey," Stony Brook University Health Sciences Center, fielded April 2007.

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Report prepared by: Nina Berlin
Reviewed by: Lori De Milto
Reviewed by: Molly McKaughan
Program Officer: Sallie Anne George