November 2009

Grant Results

SUMMARY

The Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America (CADCA) works to expand the number of community anti-drug coalitions nationwide and serves as a national resource for the development of anti-drug public policy.

CADCA supports local coalitions with:

  • Technical assistance and training.
  • Public policy initiatives.
  • Media strategies and marketing programs.
  • Conferences and special events.

Key Results
This report covers results from 1992 through December 2003, during which time the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) provided support for CADCA's core activities.

  • In the 16 years that followed its inception in 1992, CADCA's membership base grew to more than 6,300, including more than 5,250 community coalitions.
  • CADCA's annual National Leadership Forum, supported by more than 15 federal agencies and corporate sponsors brings together up to 1,500 community anti-drug coalition leaders to share successes and discuss common problems.
    • Experts in the fields of substance abuse, treatment and research have made extensive presentations.
    • Speakers have included former President Bill Clinton and numerous members of Congress.
  • CADCA also holds Mid-Year Training Institutes, which grew in size by an average of 100 people a year from 2001 to 2003.
  • Project staff has produced a range of reports, articles, newsletters, satellite broadcasts, and videos.
  • CADCA's Web site provides links to member coalitions and resources for building and sustaining community coalitions, including real-time training and technical assistance sessions.
  • In May 2001, a CADCA coalition meeting in Fairfax, Va., was the venue at which President George W. Bush announced his national drug control strategy.
  • Under the reauthorization of the Drug-Free Communities Act Support Program, CADCA was awarded a grant to run the National Community Anti-Drug Coalition Institute. The 2004 funding for the overall program was $70 million.

Assessment Findings
In 1999, an RWJF-funded independent assessment recommended that CADCA should:

  • Clarify and add precision to its strategic plan.
  • Diversify its approaches to technical assistance to coalitions.

Funding
RWJF provided a total of $19,512,749 through nine grants to CADCA. The first seven grants supported its core operations from October 1992 to December 2003. The final two grants provided time for CADCA to secure other funding and provided matching funds for its operation.

 See Grant Detail & Contact Information
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THE PROBLEM

In 1989, President George H. Bush established the President's Drug Advisory Council (PDAC), an organization uniting business, local government, education, law enforcement, and labor in anti-drug efforts. PDAC then formed, in early 1990, a National Coalition Committee, which sponsored Leadership Forum I, with the purpose of bringing together community anti-drug coalition leaders from across the country to share successes and discuss common problems. (Later on, PDAC also sponsored Leadership Forums II and III, after which it transferred responsibility for producing the forums to CADCA.)

At approximately the same time, RWJF launched its Fighting Back® national program, which helps communities implement a variety of community-wide anti-drug strategies. Fighting Back resulted in the development of a significant number of community anti-drug coalitions, both in cities that received RWJF funding and in cities that did not. At the recommendation of PDAC and many forum participants, CADCA was formed in October 1992. Its goal was to foster expansion of the number of community anti-drug coalitions, to serve as a national resource for the development of anti-drug public policy, and to deliver technical assistance, training, and other tools to help strengthen existing coalitions.

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THE PROJECT

The purpose of the first grant, ID# 020046, was to help establish CADCA as an organizational base for several hundred anti-drug community coalitions formed through efforts supported by RWJF, the federal Office of Substance Abuse and Prevention (OSAP), and PDAC. The specific objectives of the grant were to:

  1. Continue to produce Leadership Forums to provide information important to the development of community anti-drug coalitions.
  2. Encourage networking and regional cooperation; and foster the growth and expansion of community anti-drug coalitions through technical support, regional conferences, newsletters, and other publications highlighting community coalition success stories and issues pertinent to CADCA members.
  3. Provide training to create and expand coalitions.
  4. Communicate issues and concerns regarding community anti-drug coalitions to PDAC, OSAP, the Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP), and the US Congress.

The second grant, ID# 027047, provided bridge funding for CADCA to develop a longer-term strategy for the support of community initiatives in substance abuse. Through these two grants, RWJF provided approximately half of CADCA's financial support for its first three years of operation.

CADCA's goal had been to enroll 700 member coalitions by the end of its first three years. By 1995, however, CADCA membership had burgeoned to more than 3,200 dues-paying members, including 2,550 community coalitions, in all 50 states and two territories. The next RWJF grant, ID# 026903, sought to increase CADCA's capacity to be a technical assistance and policy resource to its growing and diversifying membership.

CADCA would address the needs of its original membership (the more established coalitions), while working to help the newer, less sophisticated coalitions evolve toward more comprehensive, community-wide efforts. This grant from RWJF—and all subsequent grants—constituted the primary source of core support for CADCA. (For a list of other major contributors to CADCA, see Appendix 1.)

In September 1997, RWJF conducted an extensive audit of CADCA through the international consulting firm Coopers & Lybrand. The audit revealed a number of financial weaknesses in the areas of financial policies and procedures, grant reporting, project management, and use of consultants.

To correct these weaknesses, CADCA staff and board developed a management plan and implemented a new in-house accounting system. It cut several programs that were draining the revenue base, reorganized its leadership structure (including changing the position of Chairman from part-time and voluntary into full-time and salaried), and accepted the resignation of the first CEO, appointing an interim CEO, Alvin H. Chapman, Jr.

Acknowledging the importance of CADCA's role in the growing anti-drug coalition movement, RWJF staff agreed to allow CADCA to address its needs for debt relief by accelerating the spend-down of its existing core grant to December 1998.

However, RWJF staff also recognized that with substantially less than a year of funding left from its major sponsor, CADCA would have difficulty recruiting a new CEO to lead its reorganization and restructuring. RWJF awarded grant ID# 027953 in 1998 to help CADCA in its effort to identify a highly qualified CEO.

The authorization was for approximately half the period of the previous core grant, and about 30 percent less than previous annual RWJF funding. Release of funds was tied to CADCA's meeting specific programmatic and financial benchmarks that RWJF had negotiated with it.

In August 1998, the organization hired Major General (retired) Arthur T. Dean as chairman and CEO. Dean had formerly served as director of Military Personnel Management for the Department of the Army, managing an annual budget of $21 billion with a staff of 150. In August 1998, auditors from Price Waterhouse Coopers assessed CADCA's progress in implementing the audit recommendations.

The audit revealed that CADCA had made significant strides in improving the financial management of the organization, and had implemented all of the recommendations from the management responses to the audit. In January 1999, RWJF awarded grant ID# 034748 as supplement support to the previous grant.

In anticipation of a request for continued funding from CADCA, RWJF awarded grant ID# 037750 in October 1999 to Patricia Patrizi, an independent consultant, to assess CADCA's performance and develop recommendations for strengthening the program. Patrizi's assessment found that CADCA members thought the organization was strong in disseminating information; it was less than strong in its technical assistance efforts and its focus on the state level.

Her report's key recommendations were that CADCA should: (1) clarify and add precision to its strategic plan, grounding it more in solid analysis of what needs to be done and determining how its efforts will contribute to addressing these defined needs; and (2) develop several approaches to technical assistance to coalitions, including coordinating and leveraging the resources of other substance abuse organizations and initiatives.

In December 2000, RWJF awarded grant ID# 036494 to CADCA as a bridge grant to assist the organization in transitioning primary sponsorship of its core operations from RWJF to other funding sources. The grant included $75,000 for an outside consultant, D.C.A, Inc., to assist CADCA in preparing a revised business plan for 2001 to 2003. CADCA, with guidance from its coalition advisory committee (see Appendix 2 for a list of committee members), formulated its goals as follows:

  • Provide education, training, technical assistance, and research tools to new and existing community coalitions and state associations.
  • Increase the number of coalitions and state associations and recruit them to be members of CADCA.
  • Build and maintain the revenue base for CADCA.
  • Inform and engage the American public and CADCA constituencies about the activities, effectiveness, and importance of coalitions and CADCA in preventing and reducing substance abuse.
  • Create and sustain a public policy and legislative environment conducive to helping communities become safe, healthy, and drug-free. (CADCA uses membership dues—not RWJF funds—to support its public policy initiatives.)

In June 2001, RWJF awarded a 30-month grant (ID# 040372) to CADCA to support the organization's core activities (results described below) and to provide additional time for it to secure other funding by December 2003. Two further grants (ID#s 052526 and 053125) provided additional support for CADCA to become financially independent of RWJF.

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RESULTS

The following section covers results in six areas on which CADCA focuses. Results of CADCA's work in the advocacy area, which RWJF funding did not support, are not reported here.

  • Public Policy. The federal Drug-Free Communities Act (DFCA) was passed by Congress in 1997. As of fiscal year 2001, the DFCA program has supported a total of 468 coalitions nationwide. The average annual grant for coalitions under this program is $100,000 with a required 100 percent local match. The grants are awarded for five years. Congress has allocated $100 million for this program through fiscal year 2001.

    Under the reauthorization of the Drug-Free Communities Act Support Program in 2002, CADCA received a grant to run the National Community Anti-Drug Coalition Institute. The 2004 funding for the overall program was $70 million.
  • Membership. As of summer 2001, CADCA had a membership base of 6,283, including 5,244 community coalitions (up from 4,609 and 3,871, respectively, in 1999). CADCA has sustaining and individual members, including the nation's 52 National Guard Drug Demand Reduction Administrators. CADCA's state association membership rose to 31 from 15 in 1999. According to the project director, states where a CADCA state association exists have more and stronger local coalitions; more drug-free community grantees; and more focused state coalition advocacy, guidance, and coordination. CADCA, with a headquarters staff of 20, also expanded its membership to include coalition activities that address tobacco, alcohol, and violence.
  • Training and Research. The focus of the training and research department is to assist coalitions in developing their infrastructure and increasing their focus on outcomes. CADCA provided training to more than 5,560 individuals and 60 organizations between 1995 and 2001. In 2002–2003, it held more than 30 direct onsite coalitions trainings for 2130 people. CADCA offers training curricula in Coalitions 101, Leadership, Strategic Planning for Coalitions, Team Building, Recruiting Volunteers, Community Mobilization, Financial Management for Coalitions, Evaluating Coalition Outcomes, Conflict Resolution, the ABCs of Effective Advocacy, and Community Wealth Enterprise.
  • Technical Assistance. Staff members provided technical assistance by responding to requests for information and distributing technical assistance packages. Since 1999, they responded to more than 1,850 information requests and filled more than 3,380 video orders.
    • Satellite Broadcasts. By 2004, CADCA's satellite broadcast initiative, which offers a distance-learning tool for the general public, was in its seventh season. Each year is produces six broadcasts in collaboration with the Multi-Jurisdictional Counterdrug Task Force Training program at the St. Petersburg College in St. Petersburg, Fla. Among the featured topics: "Drugs in the Workplace," "Emerging Drug Epidemics: Club Drugs," and "Safer Schools: Helping Students Resist Drugs." In 1999 and 2000, CADCA broadcasts reached an average of 300 sites in 47 states and 36 military sites, and more than 500 schools and 60 school districts. The live audience was some 4,000 along with another 2 million households through cable access. CADCA's primary technical and creative partners for this initiative were the National Guard Counterdrug Program and the Multi-Jurisdictional Counterdrug Task Force Training program. CADCA also sells videos of the programs it broadcasts to organizations and individuals.
    • Collaborations. To ensure collaboration, CADCA strengthened partnerships with other organizations that provide training, including the Center for Substance Abuse Prevention (CSAP), CSAP's National Centers for the Application of Prevention Technologies, and the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. Since 1997, CADCA has partnered with the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) to deliver research-to-practice science to the field. In 2000, CADCA entered into a cooperative agreement with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) to assist in their "You Drink You Drive You Lose" Campaign and their juvenile holdover program (a short-term, temporary holding program for youth in the justice system). (See Appendix 3 for a list of public and private partner organizations.) CADCA also received separate RWJF grants in support of two collaborative projects: (1) a grant awarded in 1996 supported a planning effort by CADCA to investigate whether collaboration among 10 national drug prevention organizations could result in rebuilding the parent drug prevention movement that existed during the 1980s (see Grant Results on ID# 028819); and (2) a grant awarded in 1997 supported CADCA in providing direction and financial oversight of a project to assist the World Institute of Leadership and Learning (a business specializing in multimedia and video technologies, health communications, and the design and development of instructional systems) in the development and preliminary assessment of a computer-based interactive, multimedia software program designed to help prevent alcohol and marijuana use among 11- to 15-year-olds (see Grant Results on ID# 031397). (See Appendix 4 for a list of RWJF grants for CADCA projects.)
    • Publications. In 2003, CADCA published its 43th volume of Strategizer, a technical assistance manual. More than 160,000 copies are in circulation, including those sent to high school and college classes. Topics have included: "Leadership and Sustaining the Momentum," and "Increasing Alcohol Excise Taxes to Promote Funding for Youth-Related Alcohol Problems." See the Bibliography for a complete list. With concern about cost and content, in 1997 CADCA discontinued its one-page IDEAs Notebook, which presented project ideas in 12 different program areas. Subsequently, CADCA negotiated with National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) to summarize and distribute important substance abuse research findings in a series of publications (six between 1997 and 2001) entitled Practical Theorist. It has distributed 5,000 copies of each of the issues. CADCA also publishes two newsletters: Coalitions (biannual) and Features (two to four times a year) which it distributed to approximately 7000 people. In addition, in 2002–2003, CADCA produced a prescription drug abuse prevention toolkit and sponsored six forums in communities reporting a major prescription drug abuse problem.
    • Resource Center. The CADCA internal resource center—a fully automated database that the staff uses to develop training materials—became operational in 1999.
  • Marketing and Communications
    • Web Site. CADCA redesigned its Web site in February 2001, adding new sections, including monthly articles written by CADCA coalition executive directors and real-time training and technical assistance sessions. Staff added a weekly CADCA E-News newsletter that it sends via listserv to more than 2,000 interested persons in the field. CADCA also began developing another site, www.drug-freekids.org, featuring anti-drug resources for parents and youth. A feature added in 2002 is Coalitions Online, which is published on a weekly basis and distributed by e-mail to more than 12,000 subscribers as of 2004.
    • Advertising/Branding. CADCA is working to surmount continuing difficulties it has faced in developing brand awareness for itself and its products. Using surveys of CADCA members, in 2000 the organization created a brand development strategy to convey the benefits associated with CADCA membership and CADCA's role in the field. CADCA developed a slogan—"CADCA—Where Community Coalitions Turn for the Tools They Need"—and reinforced it with a tool kit, an e-branding kit (a disk with the CADCA logo and slogan for members' use on letterheads, Web sites, etc.), a brochure, and public service announcements (PSAs). Its first-ever PSA—"Turning Heads"—won a Telly Award (the industrial video and film industry's most prestigious award) in 2001.
    • Media Outreach. CADCA scheduled numerous interviews and media time for CADCA officials, including appearances on: CNN Live, Fox Morning News, MSNBC, and the Washington Times. It regularly develops and sends out press releases on current topics. Project staff also made extensive presentations on CADCA projects, and newspapers such as the New York Times and USA Today, have reported its activities, as have CNN and MSNBC.
  • Meetings and Special Events
    • National Leadership Forum. As of 2008, CADCA had hosted 19 National Leadership Forums. (More than 15 federal agencies (including NIDA, ONDCP and CSAP] and corporations were co-sponsors for the 13th forum in February 2003.) The forums offered a free pre-conference day focusing on treatment, alcohol and impaired driving, and faith-based interventions. The forums, which attract up to 1,500 participants, bring together community anti-drug coalition leaders from across the country. Speakers have included former President Bill Clinton, Steven Schroeder, President of RWJF, and Joseph Califano, former secretary of the US Department of Health and Welfare, and founder of the Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse (CASA) at Columbia University.
    • Mid-Year Training Institutes. CADCA sponsored two training institutes, one in 2002 and one in 2003. The institutes offered 13 intensive four-day courses to attendees. They grew in size by an average of 200 people per year between 2001 and 2003.
    • Special Events. CADCA produced, with various collaborators, a range of anti-drug events, including the Kmart Kids Race Against Drugs (a local charity event that reached 130 coalitions and raised more than $365,000 in 2000), and a "Drug-Free Kids" program presented at the NFL Experience (a football theme park held in conjunction with 2000 Super Bowl Weekend). In 1999 it hosted the first annual Drug-Free Kids Campaign Benefit Dinner, a fund-raising event with nearly 400 guests—coalition leaders, elected officials, corporate sponsors, and others. The 2001 benefit dinner raised $313,000.

Results of Support to Strengthen CADCA as an Organization

In June 2001, RWJF's grant ID# 040372 not only supported the organization's core activities as described above, but provided additional time for it to secure other funding by December 2003. CADCA raised a total of $1,498,500 in 2003.

Since 1999, CADCA has strengthened its board of directors substantially with seven new board members, five of whom represent the corporate sector. CADCA is particularly strengthened by the addition of Alan Leshner, Ph.D., former director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse and the current CEO of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and publisher of Science magazine. (See Appendix 2 for a complete listing of CADCA's board of directors.)

In December 2004, RWJF made a one-time grant of $50,000 (ID# 052526) to help CADCA meet its financial obligations. CADCA had made significant efforts to find additional revenues from other funding sources while facing several unanticipated expenditures.

CADCA utilized $30,000 of the funds for the design and printing of publications in connection with its National Leadership Forum and purchased used audiovisual equipment that was used at the main plenary sessions and 80 workshops held at the meeting.

In November 2005, RWJF made a final three-year grant (ID# 053125), which was the capstone of its investment to secure the financial independence of CADCA. It was a matching grant program of up to $500,000. CADCA provided RWJF with evidence of $461,278 in matching funds and has continued its operations since that time without further RWJF support.

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LESSONS LEARNED

  1. Organizations with large membership bases should create a breakdown of members—by size, experience, location, ethnicity, etc.—to more effectively target training and technical assistance. Such stratification would also give funders a more accurate picture of the organization. (Program Officer)
  2. Community coalitions will face increased challenges if they do not find a way to measure their results in reducing drug use. Although research has made the case for coalitions, little research exists that provides valid and reliable measures of their effectiveness. A number of community collations have tracked and documented local results, including reductions in underage drinking and illegal drug use; and increases in the age when youth begin to use drugs and alcohol. A great many coalitions, however, still need training and technical assistance in strengthening their outcome and measurement systems. See Appendix 5 for examples of coalition results. (Project Staff)
  3. The mission needs to remain central in everything a membership organization undertakes. It is easy to take on programs made attractive by financial opportunities, even when the programs fall outside the core mission of the organization. (Program Officer)
  4. All sectors involved in community coalitions need continuous fundamental knowledge, training and evaluation competency upgrades in order to thrive and sustain their work. (Project Staff in a report to RWJF)

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AFTER THE GRANT

RWJF's support to CADCA stopped with the end of these grants. CADCA has continued in operation.

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GRANT DETAILS & CONTACT INFORMATION

Project

National Support Center for Community Substance Abuse Coalitions

Grantee

Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America (Alexandria,  VA)

  • Establishment of a National Organization of Community Anti-Drug Coalitions
    Amount: $ 500,000
    Dates: October 1992 to May 1995
    ID#:  020046

  • Amount: $ 150,000
    Dates: June 1995 to August 1995
    ID#:  027047

  • National Support Center for Community Substance Abuse Coalitions
    Amount: $ 4,099,998
    Dates: September 1995 to December 1998
    ID#:  026903

  • Amount: $ 1,700,000
    Dates: January 1999 to December 2000
    ID#:  027953

  • Amount: $ 687,585
    Dates: January 1999 to December 2000
    ID#:  034748

  • Amount: $ 675,000
    Dates: December 2000 to June 2001
    ID#:  036494

  • Amount: $ 2,787,709
    Dates: July 2001 to December 2003
    ID#:  040372

  • Amount: $ 50,000
    Dates: December 2004 to June 2005
    ID#:  052526

  • Amount: $ 500,000
    Dates: November 2005 to October 2008
    ID#:  053125

Contact

Major General Arthur T. Dean
(703) 535-8530
adean@cadca.org

Web Site

http://www.cadca.org

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APPENDICES


Appendix 1

(Current as of the time of the grant; provided by the grantee organization; not verified by RWJF.)

Major Contributors to Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America

  • Academy for Educational Development, $8,600
  • Alvah Chapman, $60,000
  • Alvah H & Wyline P. Chapman Foundation, $12,500
  • Annie E. Casey Foundation, $125,000
  • Art Modell, Baltimore Ravens, $10,000
  • Battelle, $20,000
  • Behring Diagnostics, $40,000
  • Center for Substance Abuse Prevention, $196,000
  • Center for Substance Abuse Treatment, $135,000
  • Channing Bete, $25,000
  • Chatham, $5,000
  • Columbia Partners, LLC, $5,000
  • Computer Science Corporation, $10,000
  • Chubb Corporation, $5,000
  • Danya International, $10,000
  • Department of Energy, $20,000
  • Drug Enforcement Administration, $23,000
  • Fleet Boston, $5,000
  • Floyd Hall, $20,000
  • Fox Group, $10,000
  • Gannett Corporation, $10,000
  • Gerald Roche, $10,000
  • Heidrick & Struggles, Inc., $10,000
  • Home Box Office, $100,000
  • Ingenium Corporation, $5,000
  • John L. and Sue Ann Weinberg, $10,000
  • John S. & James L. Knight Foundation, $1,320,000
  • Kansas Health Foundation, $25,000
  • Kay Management, $5,000
  • Kellogg Foundation, $75,000
  • Kmart Corporation, $440,000
  • Kmart Foundation, $225,000
  • Knight Ridder Foundation, $75,000
  • M. Bruce Nelson, Office Depot, $10,000
  • McCormick Tribune Foundation, $25,000
  • National Center for the Advancement Prevention, $150,000
  • National Football League, $55,000
  • National Football Players Association, $5,000
  • National Institution on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, $35,000
  • National Institute on Drug Abuse, $171,000
  • National Highway Traffic and Safety Administration, $15,000
  • Neil Austrian, $20,000
  • New York Times Foundation, $50,000
  • Newspaper Association of America, $5,000
  • Donald E. Newhouse, $15,000
  • Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, $20,000
  • Office of National Drug Control Policy, $282,000
  • Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation, $5,000
  • Pearson Government Solutions, $5,000
  • Pharmatech, $220,000
  • Purdue Pharma, $20,000
  • Ralph Wilson, Buffalo Bills, $10,000
  • Robert Nardelli, Home Depot, $10,000
  • Samuel I. Newhouse Foundation, $250,000
  • Servicemaster, $15,000
  • Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, $31,000
  • Sue Ann & John L Weinberg Foundation, $200,000
  • Tony Ridder, $75,000
  • Toys 'R' Us, $5,000
  • United Food and Commercial Workers Union AFL-CIO, $10,000
  • U.S. Department of Agriculture, $50,000
  • U.S. Department of Justice, $250,000
  • Washington Redskins, $15,000
  • Weil, Gotshal, and Manges, $15,000
  • Weinberg Foundation, $25,000
  • William Randolph Hearst Foundation, $50,000


Appendix 2

(Current as of the time of the grant; provided by the grantee organization; not verified by RWJF.)

CADCA Board of Directors

Major General Arthur T. Dean, US Army, Retired
Chairman and CEO
Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America
Alexandria, Va.

Neil Austrian
Past President, The National Football League
Old Greenwich, Conn.

Jerilyn Simpson
President & CEO
San Bernardino Communities Against Drugs
San Bernardino, Calif.

Alvah H. Chapman, Jr.
Director & Retired Chairman/CEO
Knight Ridder, Inc.
Miami, Fla.

Richard D. Bonnette
Co-Chairman
Partnership for a Drug-Free America
New York, N.Y.

The Honorable Alvin L. Brooks
Mayor Pro Tem
Kansas City
Kansas City, Mo.

General William W. Crouch, US Army, Retired
Consultant
Breckenridge, Colo.

Beverly Watts Davis
Executive Director
San Antonio Fighting Back of United Way
San Antonio, Texas

Lieutenant General Russell C. Davis, US Air Force
Chief, National Guard Bureau
Arlington, Va.

John P. Driscoll, Jr.
ABA Standing Committee on Substance Abuse
Nutter, McClennen & Fish, LLP
Boston, Mass.

Edward T. Foote II
Chancellor
University of Miami
Miami, Fla.

Floyd Hall
Executive Officer, Floyd Hall Enterprises
Retired Chairman, President and CEO, Kmart Corporation
Montclair, N.J.

Rev. Dr. Wesley James, Ph.D.
Chairman
Coalition for a Drug-Free Mobile County
Mobile, Ala.

Alan I. Leshner, Ph.D.
Chief Executive Officer, American Association for the Advancement of Science
Publisher, Science Magazine
Washington, D.C.

The Honorable Sander Levin
Member of Congress
12th District, Michigan
Washington, D.C.

Henry C. Lozano
President & CEO
Californians for Drug-Free Youth
Sacramento, Calif.

The Honorable Rob Portman
Member of Congress
2nd District, Ohio
Washington, D.C.

P. Anthony Ridder
Chairman and CEO
Knight Ridder, Inc.
San Jose, Calif.

Gerard R. Roche
Senior Chairman
Heidrick & Struggles, Inc.
New York, N.Y.

Mary E. Solberg
Executive Director
Troy Community Coalition
Troy, Mich.

Board of Directors as of 2009 available online.

CADCA Coalition Advisory Committee
Kareemah Hafiz Abdullah
Executive Director
Genesis Prevention Coalition, Inc.
Atlanta, Ga.

Karen Bass
Executive Director
Community Coalition for Substance Abuse Prevention and Treatment
Los Angeles, Calif.

James E. Brown
Executive Director
York County First Steps
Rock Hill, S.C.

Jane Callahan
Executive Director
Fighting Back Partnership—City of Vallejo Community Partnership
Vallejo, Calif.

Carol F. Coburn
Past Executive Director
Prevention Partners
Spencerport, N.Y.

Raymond Daw
Executive Director
Na'Nizhoozhi Center, Inc.
Gallup, N.M.

Lillian Henegar
Associate Director, Policy and Advocacy
Governor's Commission for a Drug-Free Indiana
Governor's Council on Impaired and Dangerous Driving
Indianapolis, Ind.

The Honorable Michael J. Kramer
Chair, Drug-Free Noble County
Judge, Noble Superior Court, Division 2
Albion, Ind.

Margaret L. Lebak
Executive Director
Drug-Free North Dakota
Bismarck, N.D.

Eduardo Olivarez
Chief Executive Officer
Rio Grande Valley Council on Alcohol & Drug Abuse
Edinburg, Texas

Loretta Tate
President and Chief Executive Officer
Marshall Heights Community Development Organization
Washington, D.C.

Rick Wade
Director
South Carolina Department of Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse Services
Columbia, S.C.

Pamela White
Director
Nashville Prevention Partnership
Nashville, Tenn.


Appendix 3

(Current as of the time of the grant; provided by the grantee organization; not verified by RWJF.)

Public and Private Partners with which CADCA Collaborates

Public Partners

  • CSAP's Centers for the Application of Prevention Technologies (CAPTs)
  • Department of Education
  • Department of Justice Executive Office of Weed and Seed
  • Department of State
  • Drug Enforcement Administration
  • National Guard Bureau
  • National Highway Traffic Safety Administration
  • National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
  • National Institute on Drug Abuse
  • Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention
  • Office of National Drug Control Policy
  • Safe and Drug Free Schools and Communities Program
  • Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration and its centers:
    • Center for Substance Abuse Prevent
    • Center for Substance Abuse Treatment
    • Center for Mental Health
  • Department of Education's Higher Education Center for Alcohol and Other Drug Prevention

Private Partners

  • American Bar Association
  • Campaign for Tobacco Free Kids
  • Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University
  • Center for Science in the Public Interest
  • Child Welfare League of America
  • D.A.R.E. America
  • Elks Drug Awareness Program
  • Johnson Institute
  • Join Together
  • Legal Action Center
  • Mothers Against Drunk Driving
  • National Association for Children of Alcoholics
  • National Association of Drug Court Professionals
  • National Association of State Alcohol and Drug Abuse Directors
  • National Association of Drug Abuse Addiction Counselors
  • National Crime Prevention Council
  • National Family Partnership
  • National Families in Action
  • Partnership for a Drug-Free America
  • Parental Resources and Information on Drug Education (PRIDE)
  • PRIDE Youth Programs
  • Teen Challenge
  • Therapeutic Communities of America
  • White Bison


Appendix 4

(Current as of the time of the grant; provided by the grantee organization; not verified by RWJF.)

Complete List of RWJF Grants Related to CADCA (by Start Date)

ID# 020046
Establishment of a National Organization of Community Anti-Drug Coalitions
Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America (Alexandria, Va.)
$500,000 (October 1992 to May 1995)
Project Director: Alvah H. Chapman, Jr.

ID# 026966
Comprehensive Substance Abuse Programs in the Workplace
Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America (Alexandria, Va.)
$696,000 (May 1995 to July 1996)
Project Director: James E. Copple

ID# 027407
Establishment of a National Organization of Community Anti-Drug Coalitions
Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America (Alexandria, Va.)
$150,000 (June 1995 to August 1995)
Project Director: Alvah H. Chapman, Jr.

ID# 028078
Promotion of Community Anti-Drug Coalitions
Barksdale Ballard & Company (Vienna, Va.)
$54,000 (September 1995 to October 1995)
Project Director: D. Michael Ballard

ID# 026903
National Support Center for Community Substance Abuse Coalition
Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America (Alexandria, Va.)
$4,099,998 (September 1995 to December 1998)
Project Director: Major General Arthur T. Dean

ID# 028819
Planning for Rebuilding the National Parent Movement to Prevent Drug Abuse
Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America (Alexandria, Va.)
$50,000 (August 1996 to January 1997)
Project Director: Alvah H. Chapman, Jr.

ID# 030058
National Youth Awareness Campaign
Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America (Alexandria, Va.)
$499,067 (September 1996 to August 1997)
Project Director: James E. Copple

ID# 031397
Development and Assessment of an Interactive Video to Prevent Substance Abuse Among Youth
Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America (Alexandria, Va.)
$499,716 (July 1997 to July 1998)
Project Director: Nelson Cooney

ID# 027953
National Support Center for Community Substance Abuse Coalition
Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America (Alexandria, Va.)
$1,700,000 (January 1999 to December 2000)
Project Director: Major General Arthur T. Dean

ID# 034748
National Support Center for Community Substance Abuse Coalition
Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America (Alexandria, Va.)
$687,585 (January 1999 to December 2000)
Project Director: Major General Arthur T. Dean

ID# 037750
Evaluation of the Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America
Patricia Patrizi (Wyncote, Pa.)
$327,392 (October 1999 to September 2000)
Project Director: Patricia Patrizi

ID# 036494
National Support Center for Community Substance Abuse Coalition
Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America (Alexandria, Va.)
$675,000 (December 2000 to June 2001)
Project Director: Major General Arthur T. Dean

ID# 040372
National Support Center for Community Substance Abuse Coalition
Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America (Alexandria, Va.)
$2,787,708 (July 2001 to December 2003)
Project Director: Major General Arthur T. Dean

ID# 040372
National Support Center for Community Substance Abuse Coalition
Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America (Alexandria, Va.)
$2,787,708 (July 2001 to December 2003)
Project Director: Major General Arthur T. Dean

ID# 052526
National Support Center for Community Substance Abuse Coalition
Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America (Alexandria, Va.)
$50,000 (December 2004 to June 2005)
Project Director: Brandi R. Felser

ID# 053125
Enhancing and Expanding the Community-Anti-Drug Coalitions of America's Development Effort
Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America (Alexandria, Va.)
$500,000 (November 2005 to October 2008)
Project Director: Charles Birdie


Appendix 5

(Current as of the time of the grant; provided by the grantee organization; not verified by RWJF.)

Coalition Results: Drug-Free Communities Program

California
Vallejo Fighting Back Partnership, Vallejo

  • Monthly marijuana usage rates for 7th graders were reduced from 16 percent in the 1995–96 school year to 6 percent in the 1999–2000 school year.
  • Percentage of 7th graders who used cigarettes in their lifetime was reduced steadily from 37 percent in the 1995–96 school year, to 34 percent in 1997–98, to 28 percent in 1998–99, and to 12 percent in the 1999–2000 school year.
  • Alcohol usage among 9th graders who had ever used in their lifetime was reduced by 17 percent from the 1998–99 to the 1999–2000 school year.
  • Alcohol, usage among 11th graders was reduced from 83 percent in 1998–99 to 72 percent in the 1999–2000 school year, a 13.3 percent decrease.
  • Marijuana usage among 11th graders was reduced from 60 percent in 1998–99 to 53 percent in the 1999–2000 school year, an 11.7 percent decrease.
  • Cigarette usage among 11th graders was reduced from 51 percent in 1998–99 to 39 percent in the 1999–2000 school year, a 23.5 percent decrease.

Florida
Miami Coalition for a Safe and Drug Free Community, Miami

  • Current drug (alcohol, cigarette, and marijuana) use in grades 7–12 steadily declined from 1995 to 1999.
  • In 1999, 30 percent of students in grades 7–12 had used alcohol in the past 30 days, down from 37 percent in 1997.
  • In 1999, 10 percent of students in grades 7–12 had used marijuana in the past 30 days, down from 14 percent in 1995.
  • In 1995, 7th–12th graders felt this way about marijuana:
    • 49 percent disapproved of its use.
    • 43 percent felt it was available to them.
    • 37 percent thought it was harmful.
    • 20 percent had friends who used.
    • 12 percent used.
  • In 1999, 7th–12th graders felt this way about marijuana:
    • 60 percent disapproved of its use (22 percent increase).
    • 28 percent felt it was available to them (35 percent decrease).
    • 45 percent thought it was harmful (22 percent increase).
    • 15 percent had friends who used (25 percent decrease).
    • 10 percent used (17 percent decrease).
  • A 3 percent decrease in cocaine deaths from 1,065 in 1999 to 1,034 in 2000.

Indiana
Drug-Free Noble County, Albion
(National and State levels from Monitoring the Future Study; statistics complied from local school corporations.)

  • Monthly marijuana use among 7th graders decreased by 53 percent from 10.2 percent in 1998 to 4.8 percent in 2001.
  • Monthly marijuana use among 9th graders decreased by 32 percent from 24.4 percent in 1998 to 16.6 percent in 2001.
  • Monthly binge drinking among 9th graders was reduced by 36 percent from 28.7 percent in 1998 to 18.4 percent in 2001.
  • Monthly binge drinking among 12th graders was reduced by 43 percent from 37.5 percent in 1998 to 21.2 percent in 2001.
  • Monthly alcohol usage among 12th graders in 2001 was 17 percent below both state and national averages.
  • Monthly illicit drug use among 8th–12th graders in 2001 was 12–16 percent below the state average.
  • Annual marijuana use among 12th graders in 2001 was 17 percent below the state average.
  • Monthly illicit drug use among 8th–12th graders in 2001 was 12–16 percent below the state average.
  • Annual marijuana use among 12th graders in 2001 was 17 percent below the state average.

Iowa
Project Radical Gladbook-Reinbeck School, Reinbeck

  • High school students increased their disapproval of marijuana use by 23.5 percent from 51 percent in 1998 to 63 percent in 2001.
  • In 2001, 25 percent of 7th grade students reported trying alcohol at least once, a 43.2 percent decrease from 44 percent in 1998.

Maryland
Montgomery County Community Partnership, Rockville

  • Successfully advocated for local legislation/regulations to conduct comprehensive tobacco sales compliance checks—citing both clerks and owners for noncompliance (1999), taxed noncigarette tobacco products sold in Montgomery County (1999), made all local restaurants smoke-free (currently in litigation), and eliminated self-service displays of tobacco products (2000).

Michigan
Troy Community Coalition, Troy
(National averages based on Monitoring the Future Study.)

  • 10th graders increased their disapproval of marijuana by 13.1 percent from 61 percent in 1998 to 69 percent in 2000. This is 25 percent higher than the national average of 55 percent.
  • 8th graders increased their disapproval of marijuana by 7.8 percent from 77 percent in 1998 to 83 percent in 2000. This is 13.7 percent higher than the national average of 73 percent.
  • In 2000, 4.7 percent of Troy's 8th and 10th graders reported first trying marijuana. This is a 33.8 percent decrease from 7.1 percent in 1998.
  • In 2000, 3 percent of 8th graders reported using marijuana in the last month, which was a 50 percent decrease from 6 percent in 1998. This is 67 percent lower than the national average of 9 percent.
  • In 2000, 15 percent of 10th graders reported using marijuana in the last month which was 16.7 percent decrease from 18 percent in 1998. This is 25 percent lower than national average of 20 percent.
  • From 1991, when the Troy Community Coalition began its work, to 2000, 8th grade students reporting they had consumed an alcoholic beverage in their lifetime was reduced by 22.5 percent.
  • Binge drinking among high school students was down 10 percent from 1998–2000.
  • Currently, 60 percent of the community knows the Troy Coalition and its mission.

Newaygo County Prosecutor's Office; Office of Police-School Liaison, White Cloud

  • Cigarette use among 10th graders in 2000 (35.4 percent) was below the national average of 43.0 percent according to PRIDE Surveys, and was reduced by 32.7 percent since 1996, when usage was at 52.6 percent.
  • Alcohol use among 10th graders in 2000 (50.1 percent) was below the national average of 55 percent, and was reduced by 10.7 percent since 1996, when usage was at 56.1 percent.
  • Marijuana use among 10th graders in 2000 (30.3 percent) was below the national average of 30.8 percent, and was reduced by 17.7 percent since 1996, when usage was at 36.8 percent.
  • Cigarette use among 6th, 8th, 10th, and 12th graders was reduced from 1996 rates and was below the national average for each respective grade in 2000.
  • Annual marijuana use among 10th graders was reduced by 11.1 percent from 36.8 percent in 1996 to 32.7 percent in 1998 and then further reduced by 7.3 percent from 32.7 percent in 1998 to 30.3 percent 2000, creating a total 17.6 percent reduction from 1996 to 2000.

Minnesota
Reduce the Use Coalition, Hopkins

  • In 2001, 27 percent of 12th graders reported past month use of tobacco, 25 percent lower than the state average of 36 percent.
  • In 2001, 22 percent of 9th graders reported past month use of alcohol, 26.6 percent lower than the state average of 30 percent.

Ohio
Coalition for Drug-Free Greater Cincinnati
(National Averages based on 2000 PRIDE Survey)

  • There are greater reductions in adolescent substance abuse in communities where coalitions exist than in communities where coalitions are not present. From 1993 to 2000 among 7th to 12th graders there was a 41 percent decrease in marijuana use. In the same region where a coalition did not exist, there was a 33 percent increase in marijuana use.
  • From 1993 to 2000 among 7th to 12th grader there was a 23 percent decrease in alcohol use. In the same region where a coalition did not exist, alcohol use remained constant.
  • Annual marijuana use among 11th graders in Cincinnati was 30.4 percent in 2000, 13.1 percent lower than the national average of 35 percent in the same year.
  • In 2000, 3.2 percent of Cincinnati 10th graders reported past year use of cocaine. This was 34.7 percent lower than the national average of 4.9 percent.
  • In 2000, 3.8 percent of Cincinnati 12th graders reported past year use of cocaine. This was 46.5 percent lower than the national average of 7.1 percent.
  • 6.4 percent of 11th graders reported past year hallucinogen use. This was 28.1 percent lower than the national average of 8.9 percent.
  • 7.6 percent of 12th graders reported past year hallucinogen use. This was 30.3 percent lower than the national average of 10.9 percent.
  • When students report that their parents have talked with them about drugs, adolescent usage rates declined by 26 percent.

Perrysburg Area Substance Abuse Prevention Partners, Perrysburg

  • In 2002, 49 percent of 10th graders reported alcohol use, which is a 26.6 percent decrease from 66.8 percent in 2000.
  • In 2002, 20.9 percent of 10th graders reported marijuana use, which is a 40.3 percent decrease from 35 percent in 2000.
  • In 2002, 13.9 percent of 10th graders reported tobacco use, which is a 58.1 percent decrease from 33.2 percent in 2000.

Oregon
Lane County Prevention Coalition, Eugene

  • Inhalant use within the last 30 days among Lane County 8th graders dropped from 12.4 percent in 1996 to 5.3 percent in 2000.

Pennsylvania
Community Prevention Partnership of Berks County, Reading

  • In 2000, 45.1 percent students reported that it was fairly easy to very easy to get liquor, which was a 17.6 percent decrease from 54.7 percent in 1998.
  • In 2000, 39.4 percent students reported that it was fairly easy to very easy to obtain marijuana, which was a 26.8 percent decrease from 53.8 percent in 1998.

Texas
San Antonio Fighting Back, San Antonio

  • Between 1992 and 1997 the average age of first use of illegal drugs increased from 9.4 years old to 13.5 years old.

Vermont
Springfield Community Partnership, Springfield

  • In 2001, 36 percent of students reported drinking alcohol in the past month, 16.3 percent below the state average of 43 percent.
  • In 2001, 23 percent of students reported trying marijuana, a 53.1 percent decrease from 49 percent in 1995.

 Back to the Table of Contents


BIBLIOGRAPHY

(Current as of date of this report; as provided by grantee organization; not verified by RWJF; items not available from RWJF.)

Articles

Glick B. "Reaction to Walter Shapiro Article." USA Today, March 24, 2001.

Glick B. "Hollywood Impact on Drug War." The Washington Times, June 8, 2001.

Reports

About CADCA. Alexandria, VA: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, 2000.

Building Drug-Free Communities: A Planning Guide. Alexandria, VA: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, 2001.

CADCA 2000 Election Guide. Alexandria, VA: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, 2000.

CADCA Satellite Broadcast Toolkit. Alexandria, VA: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, 1999.

Community Wealth Enterprise (technical assistance manual). Beltsville, MD: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, July 1996.

Congressional Coalition Manual. Alexandria, VA: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, 1999.

Congressional Coalitions — An Overview. Alexandria, VA: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, 1999.

Cooney, NJ and Copple, JE (ed). CADCA Position Paper In Opposition to the Legalization of Drugs. Alexandria, VA: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, 1993.

Cooney, NJ and Copple, JE (ed). Funding for the 21st Century. Alexandria, VA: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, 1994.

Cooney, NJ and Copple, JE, (ed). Don't Let Your Community Be Split By Drugs And Violence. Alexandria, VA: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, 1995.

Drug-Free Kids: What You Can Do To Stop Drug Abuse In Your Community. Alexandria, VA: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America and E*Trade, 2000.

Drug-Free Workplace Manual. Alexandria, VA: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, 2001.

IDEAs Notebook. Beltsville, MD: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, 1994.

Kick It (Youth Soccer Brochure). Baltimore: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, August 1996.

Kmart Kids Race Against Drugs Coalition Action Kit. Alexandria, VA: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, 2000.

Lessons from the Field: Community Coalitions as Catalysts for Change. Alexandria, VA: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, 2000.

National Alcohol & Drug Addiction Recovery Month. Alexandria, VA: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, 1999.

National Youth Anti-Drug Media Campaign Update. The Office of National Drug Control Policy. April 1998.

ONDCP National Youth Media Campaign Community Action Kit: A hands-on marketing guide for community coalitions. Alexandria, VA: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, 1999.

The Practical Theorist: Assessing Drug Abuse Within and Across Communities — Community Surveillance Networks. Alexandria, VA: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, 1999.

The Practical Theorist: Club Drugs. Alexandria, VA: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, 2001. In Progress.

The Practical Theorist: Community Epidemiology — Assessing Drug Abuse Within and Across Communities, Fall 1998, Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America.

The Practical Theorist: The Effects of Drugs on the Brain, Spring 1998, Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America.

The Practical Theorist: Prevention Research in Parenting and Family Intervention, Fall 1997, Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America.

The Practical Theorist: The Principles of Drug Addiction Treatment. Alexandria, VA: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, 2000.

Prescription Drug Abuse Toolkit. Alexandria, VA: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, 2002.

Say It Straight: The Truth About Medical Marijuana. Beltsville, MD: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, October 1996.

State Association Manual. Alexandria, VA: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America. 2002.

Strategizer 1: Strategic Planning for Funding of Operations and Programs Coalitions. Alexandria, VA: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, 1994.

Strategizer 2: Long-Range Planning: Vision Translated Into Action. Alexandria, VA: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, 1994.

Strategizer 3: Youth and Gang Violence: Comprehensively Meeting the Challenge. Alexandria, VA: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, 1994.

Strategizer 4: Community Coalitions: Developing a Public Relations Plan. Alexandria, VA: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, 1994.

Strategizer 5: Public Service Media Campaign Plans for Coalitions. Alexandria, VA: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, 1994.

Strategizer 6: Community Substance Use/Abuse Indicators. Alexandria, VA: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, 1994.

Strategizer 7: Evaluation of Substance Abuse Coalitions. Alexandria, VA: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, December 1994.

Strategizer 8: Coalitions Address Americans with Disabilities. Alexandria, VA: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, 1995.

Strategizer 9: Lobbying Strategies for Community Coalitions. Alexandria, VA: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, 1995.

Strategizer 10: How Coalitions Can Restrict Alcohol and Tobacco Billboard Advertising. Alexandria, VA: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, 1995.

Strategizer 11: Coalitions Hold Town Meetings. Beltsville, MD: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, 1995.

Strategizer 12: Signature Events and Celebrations. Beltsville, MD: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, 1995.

Strategizer 13: Coalitions Sponsor Media Summits. Beltsville, MD: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, July 1995.

Strategizer 14: Addressing Drug-Exposed Babies and Substance Using Mothers. Beltsville, MD: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, 1995.

Strategizer 15: Red Ribbon Celebrations. Beltsville, MD: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, 1995.

Strategizer 16: Treatment-Oriented Drug Courts. Beltsville, MD: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, 1995.

Strategizer 17: Treatment-Oriented Drug Courts (user-friendly technical assistance manual). Beltsville, MD: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, January 1996.

Strategizer 18: Procedures for establishing a Community-Based Curfew Intervention Program (user-friendly technical assistance manual). Beltsville, MD: Community Anti-

Drug Coalitions of America, March 1996.

Strategizer 19: DEA 's Demand Reduction Program (user-friendly technical assistance manual). Beltsville, MD: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, July 1996.

Strategizer 20: Register Citizens to Vote (user-friendly technical assistance manual). Beltsville, MD: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, October 1996.

Strategizer 21: Lessons on Coalition Building (user-friendly technical assistance manual). Beltsville, MD: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, February 1997.

Strategizer 22: Influencing and Eliminating Alcohol and Tobacco Sales to Minors (user-friendly technical assistance manual). Beltsville, MD: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, June 1997.

Strategizer 23: National Guard In Defense of America's Children (user-friendly technical assistance manual). Beltsville, MD: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, September 1997.

Strategizer 24: Gang Graffiti: Documentation and Removal (user-friendly technical assistance manual). Beltsville, MD: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, December 1997.

Strategizer 25: How to Start a Youth Soccer "Kick It" Campaign (user-friendly technical assistance manual). Beltsville, MD: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, February 1998.

Strategizer 26: Coalitions Address Children of Alcoholics (user-friendly technical assistance manual). Beltsville, MD: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, April 1998.

Strategizer 27: Recovery Network: Securing a Place at die Television Media Table (user-friendly technical assistance manual). Beltsville, MD: Community Anti-Drug

Coalitions of America, June 1998.

Strategizer 28: Preventing Youth Access to Alcohol from Commercial Sources. Alexandria, VA: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, 1999.

Strategizer 29: Coalitions 101 — Getting Started. Alexandria, VA: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, 1999.

Strategizer 30: Keeping Kids Drug Free — Effective Prevention Programs. Alexandria, VA: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, 1999.

Strategizer 31: Guidelines for Advocacy — Changing Policies & Laws to Create Safer Environments for Youth. Alexandria, VA: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, 1999.

Strategizer 32: Alcohol Advertising — Its Impact on Communities and What Coalitions Can Do to Lesson that Impact. Alexandria, VA: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, 2000.

Strategizer 33: Promoting a Healthy Environment: Reducing Underage Drinking. Alexandria, VA: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, 2000.

Strategizer 34: Working in Partnership with Local Colleges and Universities. Alexandria, VA: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, 2000.

Strategizer 35: Ten Leaders, Ten Years, Ten Lessons. Alexandria, VA: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, 2001.

Strategizer 36: Leadership and Sustaining the Momentum. Alexandria, VA: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, 2001.

Strategizer 37: Strategic Planning. Alexandria, VA: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, 2001.

Strategizer 38: Increasing Alcohol Excise Taxes to Promote Funding for Youth-Related Alcohol Problems. Alexandria, VA: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, 2001.

Strategizer 39: Coalition Building 103: Stratetgic Planning. Alexandria, VA: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, 2002.

Strategizer 40: Coalition Building 104: Collecting Data for Needs and Assets Assessment. Alexandria, VA: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, 2002.

Strategizer 41: Youth Leadership: How to Get and Keep Youth Involved. Alexandria, VA: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, 2002.

Strategizer 42: Building Public Support through Media Relations. Alexandria, VA: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, 2002.

Strategizer 43: The National Guard: Safe GUARDing America's Future. Alexandria, VA: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, 2002.

Audio-Visuals and Computer Software

Achieving Outcomes through the National Community Anti-Drug Coalition Institute, a 90-minute educational video. St. Petersburg, FL: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, aired on Air/Warrior/GETN Network, January 30, 2003.

Addiction Treatment: Investing in People for Business Success, a two-hour educational/training video. St. Petersburg, FL: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America. Aired on Air/Warrior/GETN Network, September 29, 1999. 35 copies sold to date.

Addictions Impact on Family and Friends, a two-hour educational/training video. St. Petersburg, FL: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America. Aired on Air/Warrior/GETN Network, June 28, 1999. 40 copies sold to date.

Advocacy: Leading the Nation towards Change, a 90-minute educational/training video. St. Petersburg, FL: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America. Aired on Air/Warrior/GETN Network September 19, 2002.

Assessing Drug Abuse Within and Across Communities: Community Epidemiology Surveillance Networks, a two-hour educational/training video. St. Petersburg, FL: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America. Aired on Air/Warrior/GETN Network, January 27, 1999. 45 copies sold to date.

Athletes and Drugs, a two-hour educational/training video. St. Petersburg, FL: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America. Aired on Air/Warrior/GETN Network July 26, 2001.

Bringing Effective Prevention to Every Community, a 90-minute educational/training video. St. Petersburg, FL: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America. Aired on Air/Warrior/GETN Network August 1, 2002.

Diversity in Prevention: Ethnicity, Culture and Environment, a two-hour educational/training video. St. Petersburg, FL: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America. Aired on Air/Warrior/GETN Network, May 25, 2000. 35 copies sold to date.

Drugs and Teens: A Conversation with Steve Young, a two-hour educational video. St. Petersburg, FL: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America. Aired on Air/Warrior/GETN Network, October 13, 1999. 20 copies sold to date.

Drugs in the Workplace. St. Petersburg, FL: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America. Aired on Air/Warrior/GETN Network. A two-hour educational/training video, aired on February 22, 2001. 457 primary sites and 1,696 secondary sites registered in 49 states including DC, Canada, and Bermuda with an audience of 30,000. And an additional 1,474 schools, 55 school districts and 44 public access stations with access to 3,117,000 households tuned in.

Emerging Drug Epidemics: Club Drugs, a two-hour educational/training video. St. Petersburg, FL: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America. Aired on Air/Warrior/GETN Network, April 25, 2000. 45 copies sold to date.

Emerging Drug Trends, a 90-minute educational/training video. St. Petersburg, FL: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, aired on Air/Warrior/GETN Network, March 27, 2003.

Environmental Approaches to Prevention, a two-hour educational/training video. St. Petersburg, FL: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America. Aired on Air/Warrior/GETN Network August 30, 2001.

Evaluation: Effective Prevention Practices to Use and Learn From, a 90-minute educational/ raining video. St. Petersburg, FL: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America. Aired on Air/Warrior/GETN Network June 20, 2002.

Faith Community Involvement in Substance Abuse Prevention, a 90-minute educational/training video. St. Petersburg, FL: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, aired on Air/Warrior/GETN Network, August 28, 2003.

Keeping Kids Drug Free: Effective Prevention Programs, a two-hour educational/training video. St. Petersburg, FL: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America. Aired on Air/Warrior/GETN Network, May 26, 1999. 50 copies sold to date

Kmart Kids Race Against Drugs, a one-half hour educational video. St. Petersburg, FL: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America. Aired on Air/Warrior/GETN Network, March 18, 1999. 10 copies sold to date

Leap of Faith: Bringing Faith-Based Programs into your Community, a 90-minute educational/training video. St. Petersburg, FL: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America. Aired on Air/Warrior/GETN Network May 16, 2002.

Measures of Effectiveness, a two-hour educational/training video. St. Petersburg, FL: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America. Aired on Air/Warrior/GETN Network, February 24, 2000. 35 copies sold to date.

Mentoring: Giving Kids a Model to Stay Drug-Free, a two-hour educational/training video. St. Petersburg, FL: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America. Aired on Air/Warrior/GETN Network, February 24, 1999. 45 copies sold to date.

ONDCP — Launch of the National Youth Anti-Drug Media Campaign, (a two-hour videocassette). St. Petersburg, FL: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America. Satellite downlink broadcast, Atlanta, July 9, 1998.

Pieces of the Prevention Puzzle: Fighting Drugs Through Cross-System Collaboration, a two-hour educational/training video. St. Petersburg, FL: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America. Aired on Air/Warrior/GETN Network, July 27, 2000. 30 copies sold to date.

Prescription Drugs: Misuse, Abuse, and Addiction. St. Petersburg, FL: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America. A two-hour educational/training video, aired on Air/Warrior/GETN Network May 31, 2001. 613 primary sites and 1,778 secondary sites registered in 49 states including DC, Canada and Bermuda with and audience of 42,000. And an additional 2,254 schools, 206 school districts and 60 public access stations with access to 4,133,000 households tuned in.

Recovering our Future: One Youth at a Time, a two-hour educational/training video. St. Petersburg, FL: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America and the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment. Aired on Air/Warrior/GETN Network, September 14, 2000. 10 copies sold to date.

Safer Schools: Helping Students to Resist Drugs, a two-hour educational/training video. St. Petersburg, FL: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America and the National Education Association. Aired on Air/Warrior/GETN Network, September 28, 2000.

Say It Straight: Medical Marijuana (2-hour videocassette). St. Petersburg, FL: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America and the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment. Satellite downlink broadcast, St. Petersburg, FL, March 25, 1997.

Schools and Drugs: The People — The Problem — The Promise (2-hour videocassette). St. Petersburg, FL: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America. Satellite downlink broadcast, Knoxville, TN, September 1997.

The Science of Addiction: The Effects of Drugs on the Brain (2-hour videocassette). St. Petersburg, FL: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America. Satellite downlink broadcast, St. Petersburg, FL, April 29, 1998.

Securing Federal Funding for Your Coalition, a 90-minute educational/training video. St. Petersburg, FL: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, aired on Air/Warrior/GETN Network, September 25, 2003.

Strategies for Working with Law Enforcement Officials, a 90-minute educational/training video. St. Petersburg, FL: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, aired on Air/Warrior/GETN Network, July 24, 2003.

Sustaining: The Future of Community Coalitions, a 90-minute educational/training video. St. Petersburg, FL: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America. Aired on Air/Warrior/GETN Network February 21, 2002. 136 primary sites tuned in with an undetermined number of actual and potential viewers.

Talk with Your Kids About, a two-hour educational/training video. St. Petersburg, FL: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America. Aired on Air/Warrior/GETN Network, March 24, 1999. 40 copies sold to date

Unite to Fight Drugs (two-hour videocassette). St. Petersburg, FL: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America. Satellite downlink broadcast, St. Petersburg, FL, February 11,1998.

Using Research to Improve Drug Abuse Treatment, a two-hour educational/training video. St. Petersburg, FL: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America. Aired on Air/Warrior/GETN Network, May 6, 1999. 15 copies sold to date

Women & Substance Abuse (two-hour videocassette). St. Petersburg, FL: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America. Satellite downlink broadcast, St. Petersburg, FL, August 19,1998.

Youth Leaders In Substance Abuse Prevention, a 90-minute educational/training video. St. Petersburg, FL: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, aired on Air/Warrior/GETN Network, May 29, 2003.

Youth Leadership. St. Petersburg, FL: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America. A two-hour educational/training video, aired on Air/Warrior/GETN Network April 5, 2001. 411 primary sites and 1,702 secondary sites registered in 47 states including DC, Canada and Bermuda with and audience of 32,000. And an additional 2,236 schools, 123 school districts and 50 public access stations with access to 3,205,000 households tuned in.

Newsletters

Coalitions. Alexandria, VA: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America. 2 to 4 issues per year. 7,000 copies mailed per issue.

Features. Alexandria, VA: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America. 2 to 4 issues per year. 10,000 copies mailed per issue.

Forum XI. Alexandria, VA: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America. 2 issues in 2000. 4,000 distributed mailed per issue.

Headliner. Alexandria, VA: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America. 3 issues in 2000. 10,000 copies mailed per issue.

Survey Instruments

Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, Coalition Outcomes Survey. Fielded nationally May–June, 2001.

Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, Effective Community Coalitions Protocol. Fielded nationally, March–August 1999.

Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, Membership Survey. Fielded nationally December 1999.

Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, Training and Technical Assistance Survey. Fielded nationally, November 1999.

Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, Training and Technical Assistance Survey. Fielded nationally, November 2000.

World Wide Web Sites

cadca.org provides information about resources, membership, training and technical assistance opportunities, and links to substance abuse related web sites. Alexandria, VA: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America.

www.drug-freekids.org (no longer available) encouraged youth to reject alcohol, tobacco and other drugs by reaching young people and their families with positive, effective prevention messages. Alexandria, VA: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America.

www.cadca.org/cadca_tv/all hosts the CADCA satellite broadcasts live and for future viewing via the Web. Rockville, MD: National Clearinghouse for Alcohol and Drug Information.

Sponsored Conferences

Mid-Year Training Institutes:

  • "Leadership, Linkages & Learning: Gateway to Coalition Results," San Francisco, July 27–August 1, 2003.
  • "Theory Practice and Outcomes," Mid-Year Training Institute 2002, Seattle. August 6–9, Seattle.

State Association Meeting, February 13, 2003, Washington.

State Association Meeting, December 13, 2001, Washington.

"State Association Meeting," January 5, 1999, Washington. Attended by 30 individuals from 25 organizations including state agencies and national organizations.

"Federal Partners Forum," May 11, 1999, Washington. Attended by 20 officials from organizations including federal and state agencies, national organizations and community coalitions.

"1999 Exemplary Substance Abuse Prevention Program Review Committee Meeting," March 15–17, 2000, Washington. Attended by 14 national leaders in the field to review nominations presented to the Center for Substance Abuse Prevention, the National Association of State Alcohol and Drug Abuse Directors, the National Prevention Network, and CADCA, Senior Vice President, Training and Research and Training Associate from organizations including federal and state agencies, national organizations and community coalitions.

"Federal Partners Forum," April 5, 2000, Washington. Attended by 20 officials from organizations including federal and state agencies, national organizations and community coalitions.

"Coalition Building 101: Training-of-Trainers," August 1–3, 2000, Chicago. Attended by 10 statewide representatives from organizations including federal and state agencies, national organizations and community coalitions.

"Getting to Outcomes Training-of-Trainers," August 21–22, 2000, Alexandria, VA. Attended by 16 consultant trainers from organizations including federal and state agencies, national organizations and community coalitions.

"13th Annual National Prevention Network, Prevention Research Conference," (Co-sponsored with names of other sponsors), September 24–27, 2000, Columbus, OH, attended by over 800 prevention leaders from organizations including federal and state agencies, national organizations and community coalitions.

"Youth Leadership Academy Orientation," October 28, 2000, Bowie, MD. Attended by youth leaders and their chaperones/mentors from community coalitions.

"Substance Abuse Prevention Specialist Training," November 11–13, 2000, Alexandria, VA. Attended by 10 consultant trainers to become certified to deliver curriculum from organizations including federal and state agencies, national organizations and community coalitions.

"NICI/CADCA Grant Writing Course," November 12–17, 2000, Leavenworth, KS. Attended by 26 members from organizations including federal and state agencies, national organizations, and community coalitions.

National Leadership Forums I–IX. The Forums are key events for CADCA. Attracting some 1,500 participants, they are designed to bring together community anti-drug coalition leaders from across the country to share successes and discuss common problems. Speakers have included President George W. Bush, ONDCP director John Walters, former President Bill Clinton, former NIDA director Alan Leshner, and former ONDCP director General Barry McCaffrey. Information on recent forums is available online.

"Technical Assistance Exchange Meeting," January 18, 2001, Alexandria, VA. Attended by 45 members of the public-private technical assistance exchange partnerships from national organizations and government agencies.

"Federal Partners Forum," February 26, 2001, Washington. Attended by 22 officials from organizations including federal, state and national organizations and community coalitions.

"2000 Exemplary Substance Abuse Prevention Program Review Committee Meeting," March 19–21, 2001, Washington. Attended by 16 national leaders in the field to review nominations presented to the Center for Substance Abuse Prevention, the National Association of State Alcohol and Drug Abuse Directors, Inc, the National Prevention Network and CADCA.

"Delegation from Barbados," April 27, 2001, Alexandria, VA. Attended by 12 visitors from the Barbados government, local organizations and national organizations.

"Technical Assistance Exchange Meeting," May 10, 2001, Washington. Attended by 45 members of the public-private technical assistance exchange partnerships from national organizations and government agencies.

"Membership Meeting," May 16, 2001, Washington. Attended by 8 members of community coalitions including KIDco/TADco, Cal Partners, Oregon Partnership, Coalition for a Drug-Free Greater Cincinnati, Noble County Coordinating Council for a Drug-Free Indiana, Empowerment Zone Coalition, Community Action Partnership for Prevention and Broward County Commission on Substance Abuse.

Presentations (Web-Based)

Drugs in the Workplace, St. Petersburg, FL: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America. Aired on Air/Warrior/GETN Network, February 22, 2001.

Youth Leadership, St. Petersburg, FL: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America. Aired on Air/Warrior/GETN Network April 5, 2001.

Prescription Drugs: Misuse, Abuse, and Addiction, St. Petersburg, FL: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America. Aired on Air/Warrior/GETN Network May 31, 2001.

"Current Trends in Environmental Approaches to Prevention" St. Petersburg, FL: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America. Aired on Air/Warrior/GETN Network August 1, 2001.

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Report prepared by: Molly McKaughan
Report prepared by: Robert Crum
Report prepared by: Fran Karo
Reviewed by: Marian Bass
Reviewed by: Patricia Patrizi
Reviewed by: Molly McKaughan
Reviewed by: Janet Spencer King
Program Officer: Floyd Morris
Program Officer: Dwayne Proctor
Program Officer: Kristin Schubert

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