October 2008

Grant Results

SUMMARY

From 2001 to 2006, staff at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign College of Applied Life Studies established a National Blueprint Office to help implement the National Blueprint for Increasing Physical Activity Among Adults Age 50 and Older, released in 2001 and funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF).

The Blueprint Office worked with the 50 national organizations that contributed to the Blueprint to establish priorities in implementing it, coordinate their efforts to fulfill those priorities, facilitate communication among the partners and provide technical assistance.

To advance the Blueprint at the local level, the Blueprint Office also provided minigrants (up to $25,000) to 20 communities to help them overcome barriers that prevent older people from being physically active.

Key Results

  • Blueprint partners chose 18 high-priority strategies from the more than 80 strategies in the Blueprint, a lead organization for each strategy and action items to implement within two years. By coordinating activities and sharing resources, Blueprint partners made progress on nearly every strategy.
  • The 20 minigrant projects reached nearly 10,000 older adults in 15 states and provided best practices that other communities can adapt to their own needs.
  • The Blueprint process and minigrant project encouraged partner organizations to make implementing the Blueprint a priority and helped spur a groundswell of recognition of the importance of physical activity and disease prevention among older adults, according to the project director.

Funding
The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) funded the project with solicited grants of $1,257,030 between August 2001 and December 2006. Human Kinetics, a publisher of health and fitness textbooks, provided funding to support the Active Aging Partnership's Blueprint Web site.

 See Grant Detail & Contact Information
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THE PROBLEM

Many barriers prevent older Americans from achieving an active lifestyle. The National Blueprint for Increasing Physical Activity Among Adults Age 50 and Older identified major barriers in the following areas:

  • Research
  • Home and community
  • Work sites
  • Medical systems
  • Public policy
  • Communication

For example, older people may be unable to walk if their neighborhoods lack sidewalks or are dangerous. Community resources (neighborhoods, apartment complexes, senior centers, community centers, schools and places of worship) are often disconnected. Few models exist of a community approach to encourage physical activity.

The Blueprint provided a framework for addressing the barriers that prevent older Americans from achieving an active lifestyle. A key recommendation was the need to promote communication and coalitions among participating organizations to encourage active aging. (For more information on the Blueprint, see Grant Results on ID# 039866.)

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RWJF STRATEGY

RWJF funded an array of projects and programs to help older adults be more physically active. The centerpiece program was Active for Life: Increasing Physical Activity Levels in Adults Age 50 and Older. (For more information see Grant Results.) One other large project was AARP's social marketing campaign in Richmond, Va., and Madison, Wis., to increase physical activity among older adults. See Grant Results on ID# 046220.

This body of work was funded through RWJF's Physical Activity Team, which focused on all age groups and sought to improve physical activity levels through changes to the environment. When RWJF created a strategic objective of reversing the childhood obesity epidemic by 2015, it focused its physical activity funding on this age group.

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THE PROJECT

From 2001 to 2006, staff at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign College of Applied Life Studies established a National Blueprint Office to help implement the National Blueprint for Increasing Physical Activity Among Adults Age 50 and Older. The resulting activities occurred under four grants.

The First Grant

An initial grant (ID# 042134) enabled the College of Applied Life Studies, working with the American College of Sports Medicine, to create the National Blueprint Office, under the direction of Wojtek Chodzko-Zajko, Ph.D. The office facilitated communication among more than 50 national partners, provided advice and technical assistance and coordinated their efforts to fulfill the Blueprint.

As part of these efforts, the office:

  • Asked partner organizations to provide written descriptions of their involvement in physical activity and older adults, as well as their plans to collaborate with other groups to promote such activity (80 percent response). Respondents cited translating research findings into practical intervention strategies for home and community settings as their highest priority.
  • Organized two conferences to encourage partner organizations to develop strategies for implementing the Blueprint:
    • The first conference, held October 3–4, 2002, in Washington, attracted 85 participants from Blueprint partners and other organizations. U.S. Administration on Aging Assistant Secretary Josefina Carbonell and Deputy Assistant Secretary Edwin Walker were keynote speakers.
    • The second conference, held January 15–16, 2004, in Washington, drew 60 participants from Blueprint partners and other organizations.
  • Provided technical assistance to the U.S. Administration on Aging, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Office of the Surgeon General and other federal and private organizations to help them promote physical activity among older adults. For example:
    • The project director served as a consultant to the U.S. Administration on Aging's "You Can! Steps for Healthier Aging Campaign," signing up 2,450 partner organizations in August 2005.
    • The project director was a consultant on a task force to recommend updates to Exercise: A Guide from the National Institute on Aging.
    • The National Blueprint Office produced Designing Safe and Effective Physical Activity Programs for Older Adults for the National Council on the Aging and coordinated the development of two other issue briefs.
  • Convened yearly meetings of the Active Aging Partnership (AAP), an existing coalition organized by the American College of Sports Medicine that acted as the steering committee for the Blueprint effort. AAP members include:

Two Spin-off Projects

Work on the initial project yielded two spin-off projects funded with separate RWJF grants:

  • To implement Blueprint guidelines at the local level, in 2002, RWJF funded a minigrant project that provided up to $25,000 to 20 communities over 15 months to address barriers that prevent older adults from being physically active (ID# 044938). Chodzko-Zajko, director of the National Blueprint Office, oversaw the project. (See Appendices 1, 2, and 3 for more details.)
  • Blueprint Office staff organized a public policy roundtable on February 14, 2003, at AARP headquarters in Washington to develop national legislative priorities and strategies to promote physical activity for people age 50 and older (ID# 047615). Some 15 individuals from key Blueprint organizations, as well as selected public policy experts, attended.

The Final Grant

In 2004, after RWJF decided to move away from funding programs on physical activity that were not focused on children, the Blueprint Office received a two-year transition grant to continue its work and to seek financial support from other organizations (ID# 048957). This final grant was funded under the Active for Life program.

Other Funding

The National Council on Aging provided $300,000 for Blueprint staff to provide technical assistance to the Center for Healthy Aging project and Web site.

The project also received funding from the Retirement Research Foundation, Chicago ($735,838), and the Archstone Foundation, Long Beach, Calif. ($176,000).

Communications

Project staff created a Web site to share information on research, best practices and events about aging and physical activity, as well as presentations, photos and other materials that partners could use in promoting the Blueprint. Staff also sent quarterly e-mail newsletters to Blueprint organizations and developed brochures, news releases and fact sheets on the minigrants and other activities.

The project director presented information on the Blueprint and the minigrant project at more than 30 national conferences. Staff and partners published articles on Blueprint strategies in 11 academic journals. See the Bibliography for details.

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RESULTS

Project staff reported the following results to RWJF:

  • Blueprint partners chose 18 high-priority strategies in the areas of home/community, marketing, medical systems, public policy and research from more than 80 strategies in the original Blueprint. Partners also chose a lead organization for each strategy and action items to implement within two years. The strategies included:
    • Developing resources for clinicians to use in making personalized physical activity recommendations/prescriptions for their patients.
    • Disseminating information on physical activity guidelines and best practices to the medical community.
    • Supporting efforts to develop physical activity programs and messages targeted to specific segments of the age 50 and older population.
    • Identifying professionals in the community who can serve as resources for programs and groups working in the area of aging and physical activity.
    Project staff then created Strategic Priorities for Increasing Physical Activity and distributed it to Blueprint partners.
  • By coordinating activities and sharing resources, Blueprint partners made progress on nearly every high-priority strategy, according to the project director. Blueprint Office staff outlined this work in the 2004 National Blueprint Progress Report, distributed to Blueprint organizations. For example:
    • The American Geriatrics Society collaborated with the American Association of Family Physicians, the American College of Sports Medicine and the Thera-Band Corp. (which produces exercise bands) to produce a toolkit to help clinicians make personalized recommendations on physical activity for their patients.
    • A coalition of national organizations led by the American College of Sports Medicine and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention developed an overview of best practices, guidelines and recommendations on physical activity for older adults.
    • The American College of Sports Medicine developed Profinder, a Web-based directory of 800 experts who can provide advice and assistance to individuals and groups on aging and physical activity. Other Blueprint partners are working on similar inventories of community resources.
  • Based on the 2003 public policy roundtable, Blueprint staff and partner organizations developed Physical Activity for Age 50+: Setting the Public Policy Agenda, a briefing book identifying eight public policy priorities. Staff distributed about 10,000 copies, which partner organizations used to work with members of Congress and other public officials, according to the project director. Priorities included:
    • Strengthening the physical activity component in the Medicare Senior Risk Reduction Program.
    • Establishing Centers of Excellence in physical activity and preventive health.
    • Increasing support for local coalitions that can advocate for physical activity at the community level.
  • The 20 minigrant projects reached nearly 10,000 older adults in 15 states. Walking was the most common activity among participants in the projects. Other activities included strength training, yoga, Tai Chi, water aerobics, chair aerobics and gardening. The projects:
    • Often targeted interventions to specific segments of the population, such as minorities, low-income adults or frail older adults.
    • Sponsored walk-a-thons and guided community walk programs, fitness programs at senior meal sites, workshop series and in-home fitness education.
    • Often included an intergenerational component and offered incentives to entice older adults to exercise, such as water bottles, T-shirts and pedometers.
    • Encouraged participants to record their progress on a Web site or an activity log.
    Additional funding from local organizations, corporations and agencies helped sustain 16 of the 20 projects.
  • The projects modeled best practices that other communities can adapt for their own needs, according to the project director. Project staff wrote and published the National Blueprint Mini-Grant Outcomes Report to disseminate these models, distributing 500 copies through partner organizations and conferences related to aging and physical activity. The following are examples of the projects:
    • The New York chapter of the Arthritis Foundation established a coalition of 200 Hispanic leaders representing agencies, hospitals, churches and senior centers in the Bronx. Staff created "Spanish People with Arthritis Can Exercise (PACE)," an eight-week course that provides endurance-building activities, relaxation techniques and health discussions. Some 60 older adults participated, and staff contacted another 500 through mailings and health fairs.

      Of the 60 attendees, 37 completed pre- and post-course questionnaires. Respondents showed improvement in all measured outcomes: daily activities, arthritis symptoms, knowledge, ability to manage symptoms and depression. For example, only 27 percent of participants could manage their symptoms before the program, whereas 89 percent could do so after the program.
    • The Look Up to Fitness project of Blue Cross & Blue Shield of Rhode Island included partners from the state Department of Environment Management, the Providence Senior Citizens Center, Providence Place Mall and local churches.

      The campaign recruited 973 inner-city adults ages 50 to 83 to sign a pledge to complete a physical activity program, set individual fitness goals and keep an activity log. A raffle awarded 10 prizes of $500 to those who completed the program and earned more than 1,000 points on activity scores.

      Participants reported improvements on several health indicators. For example, 90 percent reported either "very good" or "good" levels of physical activity, compared with 60 percent at baseline.
    • The Hennepin County Step To It Northside project promoted physical activity among older adults in North Minneapolis, a low-income neighborhood that receives media attention for crime and poor health outcomes. The project was a partnership of the county Public Health Promotion, the Minneapolis Public Housing Authority, Pilot City Health Center, Stairstep Foundation, Minneapolis Public Works and the Minneapolis Crime Prevention and Safe Program.

      More than 20 local organizations provided support to build a two-mile path on a major thoroughfare, which drew more than 100 walkers for weekly events. In a questionnaire, 67 percent of participants said Step To It Northside had increased their walking, 83 percent said it had improved their physical or social health and 100 percent said it had improved their mental health.
  • The Blueprint process and minigrant project encouraged partner organizations to make implementing the Blueprint a priority, and they helped spur a groundswell of recognition of the importance of physical activity and disease prevention among older adults, according to the project director. For example:
    • The ARRP Web site now promotes physical activity and disease prevention — previously a lower priority.
    • The U.S. Administration on Aging developed the "You Can! Steps for Healthier Aging Campaign" and now emphasizes evidence-based disease prevention and funds research on it.
    • The National Council on the Aging used the Blueprint as its model in convening a National Summit on Falls Prevention and identifying effective interventions to address falls among elders.

Challenges

Maintaining the momentum of the Blueprint coalition in the face of RWJF's decision to move away from funding programs on healthy aging was the project's biggest challenge, according to Project Director Chodzko-Zajko.

He and RWJF Program Officer Terry Bazzarre solicited funding from partners to sustain the Blueprint Office after the RWJF grants ended. However, many partners, including federal agencies, confronted their own funding challenges, according to Bazzarre. Thus, the Blueprint Office was unable to maintain all its activities, although it continued some of them. (For more details, see After the Grant.)

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LESSONS LEARNED

  1. When spearheading a broad coalition, establish an agenda that all participants will feel proud and excited to support. The agenda needs to include strategies of high interest to every member organization. In the case of this project, a 2002 conference led to the Strategic Priorities for Increasing Physical Activity, which was a subset of the original Blueprint priorities. (Project Director/Chodzko-Zajko)
  2. When convening many groups for a consensus meeting, anticipate the "deliverable" you want without prescribing the discussion. For example, at the initial meeting hosted by RWJF to create the Blueprint, participants came up with 80 barriers to physical activity among older adults, and 80 strategies to overcome them. At the next conference, the project director helped participants focus on a more manageable 18 strategies. (Project Director/Chodzko-Zajko)
  3. In working with a multisector coalition, create a steering committee composed of representatives from a wide range of organizations. By relying on the Active Aging Partnership, the Blueprint Office prevented any one group from becoming too influential. (Project Director/Chodzko-Zajko)
  4. To implement a grant program in a diverse set of communities, allow them to create coalitions and develop projects appropriate to their local cultures and local needs. Innovative coalitions, like that established by the New York chapter of the Arthritis Foundation, can make a difference in promoting physical activity and healthy behavior in adults. (Project Director/Chodzko-Zajko)
  5. When community groups are developing a project on a limited budget, do not require them to revamp existing efforts or to use "evidence-based" programs. Local groups may have invested years in creating programs that are having an impact. National organizations can help by suggesting small changes in existing programs or by giving local coalitions a menu of options. (Project Director/Chodzko-Zajko)
  6. A small amount of funding can help local organizations create projects and partnerships. With minigrants of $25,000, a total of 20 organizations formed coalitions and devised projects to promote physical activity among older adults. "A small amount of funding is sufficient to attract interest and encourage people to create effective partnerships," said RWJF Program Officer Terry Bazzarre.
  7. To evaluate proposals on physical activity, rely on a panel of experts who are knowledgeable about the elements of an effective intervention. The members of the minigrant national advisory board were adept at ranking project proposals based on their perceived sustainability, feasibility, relevance and outcomes. (Project Director/Chodzko-Zajko)

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AFTER THE GRANT

As of June 2008, the Blueprint Office was continuing to organize meetings and send an e-mail newsletter to partners. For example, in 2007 the office convened a meeting in Urbana-Champaign, Ill., on best practices in physical activity programs for seniors. Some 20 partner organizations attended. It also organized a session at the International Council on Active Aging in Las Vegas. These activities drew on the funding from the Retirement Research Foundation and Archstone Foundation noted earlier.

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GRANT DETAILS & CONTACT INFORMATION

Project

Addressing Barriers to Physical Activity Among Adults Age 50 and Older

Grantee

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign College of Applied Life Studies (Champaign,  IL)

  • Facilitating Communications Among Organizations Using the National Blueprint: Increasing Physical Activity Among Older Adults Age 50 and Older
    Amount: $ 539,089
    Dates: August 2001 to January 2004
    ID#:  042134

  • Addressing Barriers to Physical Activity Among Adults Age 50 and Older Through Community-Based Organizations
    Amount: $ 574,668
    Dates: October 2002 to December 2006
    ID#:  044938

  • Conference on Public Policy Issues and Priorities in Promoting Physical Activity Among Adults Age 50 and Over
    Amount: $ 21,719
    Dates: January 2003 to June 2004
    ID#:  047615

  • Extending the Dialogue and Initiatives of a National Blueprint to Increase Physical Activity Among Adults Age 50+
    Amount: $ 121,554
    Dates: August 2003 to July 2005
    ID#:  048957

Contact

Wojtek J. Chodzko-Zajko
(217) 244-0823
wojtek@uiuc.edu

Web Site

http://www.agingblueprint.org/overview.cfm

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APPENDICES


Appendix 1

The Minigrant Projects

In the minigrant demonstration projects, staff required grant applicants to propose strategies they could implement within one year, as they would have three months to plan their programs and 12 months to implement and evaluate them. Selection criteria included projects that:

  • Selected one or two specific barriers to address.
  • Targeted culturally diverse audiences.
  • Promoted intergenerational programs (such as efforts by church-affiliated youth groups to create walking paths in senior housing projects).
  • Promoted collaboration between two or more community partners.
  • Addressed environmental issues (such as lack of sidewalks).
  • Showed local support for the project through an in-kind match.
  • Showed evidence of sustainability.

In April 2003, a national advisory committee, assisted by RWJF program officers Terry Bazzarre and Robin Mockenhaupt, chose 20 communities of varying socioeconomic statuses and ethnicities in 15 states to participate in the project. (See Appendix 2 for a list of advisory committee members, and Appendix 3 for a list of projects.)

Activities
Common Characteristics of Top Projects

To help create a model of best practices, the National Blueprint Office worked with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in July 2003 to analyze funded and highly rated nonfunded projects. This analysis indicated that:

  • To maximize resources and promote sustainability, top projects fostered partnerships among local groups such as senior centers, parks, athletic clubs and public health and faith-based organizations.
  • Funded coalitions relied on a solid infrastructure to implement activities within a few weeks of grant notification.

Survey of Nonfunded Projects
To learn how the National Blueprint Office could help communities encourage physical activity among older adults, project staff also conducted an online survey in summer 2003 of applicants that did not receive funding. Nearly 120 organizations responded. Participants reported several barriers to implementing new physical activity programs for older adults:

  • Lack of funding (100 percent)
  • Competing priorities (35 percent)
  • Lack of time (25 percent)

Nearly half of the 120 survey participants reported that they planned to begin their proposed project without funding from RWJF. Survey participants asked the National Blueprint Office to provide:

  • Information on other funding sources.
  • Access to printed resources on physical activity and aging and on communication and marketing tools.
  • Referrals to communities that could share best practices.


Appendix 2

(Current as of the time of the grant; provided by the grantee organization; not verified by RWJF.)

National Advisory Group Members

(Affiliations current as of membership)

David Brown
Senior Behavioral Scientist
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Atlanta, Ga.

David Buchner
Chief, Physical Activity and Health Branch
Division of Nutrition and Physical Activity
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Atlanta, Ga.

Jackie Epping
Public Health Educator, Physical Activity and Health Branch
Division of Nutrition and Physical Activity
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Atlanta, Ga.

Catherine Gordon
Senior Public Health Analyst
Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services
Washington, D.C.

Christine Himes
American Geriatrics Society
Chair, Department of Sociology
Syracuse University
Syracuse, N.Y.

Melane Hoffman
Director, Health Campaigns
AARP
Washington, D.C.

Steven Hooker
California Department of Public Health
Sacramento, Calif.

Roseann Lyle
American College of Sports Medicine
Indianapolis, Ind.

Marcia Ory
Director, Active for Life
Texas A&M University System Health Science
Center School of Rural Public Health
College Station, Texas

Jane Senior
American College of Sports Medicine
Indianapolis, Ind.

Sharyn Sutton
President
Sutton Social Marketing
Washington, D.C.

Nancy Whitelaw
Senior Vice President
National Council on the Aging
Washington, D.C.


Appendix 3

Minigrant Grantees and Projects

Arthritis Foundation, Maryland Chapter
Partners for Active Living
Owings Mills, Md.

Arthritis Foundation, New York Chapter
Spanish People with Arthritis Can Exercise (PACE)
New York, N.Y.

Blue Cross & Blue Shield of Rhode Island
Look Up to Fitness
Providence, R.I.

Cabarrus County Department of Aging
30-Minutes for Life
Concord, N.C.

Comprehensive Health Education Foundation
Sound Steps
Seattle, Wash.

East Central Illinois Rural Health Network
Take Charge Challenge
Mattoon, Ill.

Fairfield University School of Nursing
Step Up to Health
Fairfield, Conn.

Greater Lafayette Coalition for Living Well After 50
Awareness, Communication & Education Initiative (ACE)
West Lafayette, Ind.

Greater Southern Brooklyn Health Coalition
Brooklyn Blueprint Program
Brooklyn, N.Y.

Harford County Office on Aging
Harford Active Life Program
Bel Air, Md.

Health Research/New York State Department of Health
Passport to Wellness: Walking for Health
Albany, N.Y.

Hennepin County
Step To It Northside
Minneapolis, Minn.

Ho-Chunk Nation Division of Health
Ho-Chunk National Elder Fitness Program
Black River Falls, Wis.

Palmetto Conservation Foundation
Get Active Glenn Springs
Spartanburg, S.C.

Partners in Care Foundation
Enhancing Physical Activity for Frail Elders
Burbank, Calif.

Paterson YMCA
Active Adult Fitness Program
Paterson, N.J.

Supporters of Doelger Senior Center
Fueling Fitness
Daly City, Calif.

Terwilliger Plaza
ABLE Bodies
Portland, Ore.

Texas Cooperative Extension-Dallas County
Wellness in the City
Dallas, Texas

Tufts University, Center for Physical Activity and Nutrition
The Strong Women Program
Boston, Mass.

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BIBLIOGRAPHY

(Current as of date of this report; as provided by grantee organization; not verified by RWJF; items not available from RWJF.)

Articles

Armstrong S, Sloan S, Turner M and Chodzko-Zajko WJ. "National Blueprint for Increasing Physical Activity Among Adults 50 and Older." Journal of Aging and Physical Activity, 9S: S5–S13, 2001.

Chodzko-Zajko W, Ory M and Resnick B. "Beyond Screening: Has Preenrollment Screening Become a Barrier to Participation for Sedentary Older Adults?" Journal of Active Aging, 26–29, July 2004.

Chodzko-Zajko W, Sheppard L, Senior J, Park CH, Mockenhaupt R and Bazzarre T. "The USA National Strategic Plan for Promoting Physical Activity in the Mid-Life and Older Adult Population: A Four-Year Progress Report on the National Blueprint." Quest, 57: 3–13, 2005.

Cress ME, Buchner D, Prohaska T, Rimmer J, Brown M, Macera C, DiPietro L and Chodzko-Zajko W. "Physical Activity Programs and Behavior Counseling in Older Adult Populations." Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 3611: 1997–2003, 2004.

Li F, Fisher KJ, Bauman A, Ory M, Chodzko-Zajko W, Harmer P, Bosworth M and Cleveland M. "Neighborhood-Level Influences on Physical Activity in Middle-Aged and Older Adults: A Multilevel Analysis." Journal of Aging & Physical Activity, 13: 87–115, 2005.

Sheppard L, Senior J, Park C, Mockenhaupt R and Chodzko-Zajko W. "Strategic Priorities for Increasing Physical Activity Among Adults Age 50 and Older: The National Blueprint Consensus Conference Summary Report." Journal of Aging and Physical Activity, 11(3): 286–292, 2003.

Sheppard L, Senior J, Park C, Mockenhaupt R and Chodzko-Zajko W. "ACSM Continues to Play a Lead Role in Aging and Activity Consortium. Excerpt from Executive Summary: National Blueprint: Increasing Physical Activity Among Older Adults." ACSM's Health & Fitness Journal, 7(2): 12, 2003.

Sheppard L, Senior J, Park C, Mockenhaupt R and Chodzko-Zaiko W. "A Blueprint for Change." Journal on Active Aging, 2(2): 42–47, 2003.

Sheppard L, Senior J, Park C, Mockenhaupt R, Bazzarre T and Chodzko-Zajko W. "The National Blueprint Consensus Conference Summary Report: Strategic Priorities for Increasing Physical Activity Among Adults Age 50+." American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 25: 209–213, 2003.

Sheppard L, Senior J, Park C, Mockenhaupt R, Bazzare T and Chodzko-Zajko W. "The National Blueprint Consensus Conference." Annals of Long-Term Care, 11(10): 33, 2003.

Sheppard L, Senior J, Park C, Mockenhaupt R, Bazzarre T and Chodzko-Zajko W. "Strategic Priorities for Increasing Physical Activity Among Adults Age 50 and Older: The National Blueprint Consensus Conference Summary Report." Journal of Sports Science and Medicine, 2(4): 169–174, 2003.

Reports

Blueprint Partners Project. Urbana-Champaign: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, February 2002.

Blueprint Partners Project Update: Fall 2002. Urbana-Champaign: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, September 2002.

Blueprint Mini-Grant Update. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Fall 2003. Available online.

Physical Activity for the Age 50+: Setting the Public Policy Agenda. Briefing book. Urbana-Champaign, Ill.: National Blueprint Office, 2003.

Strategic Priorities for Increasing Physical Activity Among Adults Age 50 and Older: The National Blueprint Consensus Conference Summary Report. Urbana-Champaign, Ill.: National Blueprint Office, 2003. Available online.

Strategic Priorities 2003. Urbana-Champaign: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, February 2003.

2003 Fall Update. Urbana-Champaign: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, October 2003.

2004 National Blueprint Progress Report. Urbana-Champaign: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2004.

National Blueprint Office. "Designing Safe and Effective Physical Activity Programs." Washington: National Council on the Aging, Winter 2004.

National Blueprint Mini-Grant Outcomes Report. Urbana-Champaign: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Winter 2005. Available online.

Survey Instruments

"National Blueprint Mini-Grants." University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, fielded online July–August 2003.

World Wide Web Sites

www.agingblueprint.org. Created to facilitate communication and resources among the National Blueprint Office and partner organizations and with the public. Supported by Human Kinetics. National Blueprint Office, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2001.

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Report prepared by: Susan G. Parker
Reviewed by: Sandra Hackman
Reviewed by: Molly McKaughan
Program Officer: Terry L. Bazzarre

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