December 2002

Grant Results

SUMMARY

The Health Promotion Research Foundation held the 12th Annual Art and Science of Health Promotion Conference on February 12–16, 2001, in Washington, D.C., to begin to document the health and financial impact of health promotion.

Over 700 people attended, including representatives from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and the White House Medical Unit.

Key Findings
Among the conference findings and recommendations were:

  • Health promotion must become an integral part of health care, education, the worksite, neighborhoods, families, and local, state and federal policy.
  • The field must demonstrate that health promotion can produce long-lasting change, and develop standard research-based protocols that establish which methods work best for different populations, including children and older adults.
  • There is a huge gap between the best programs and the typical ones.
  • Increased funding is needed to widely disseminate current research results and best-practice strategies to scientists, health promotion practitioners and policymakers.

Key Results
The American Journal of Health Promotion published three special issues based on the conference.

Funding
The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) provided a $30,000 grant from April to October 2001 in partial support for the conference.

 See Grant Detail & Contact Information
 Back to the Table of Contents


THE PROBLEM

Health promotion is the most effective strategy for achieving at least 14 of the 26 major objectives that have been outlined in Healthy People 2010, yet little of the $4 billion that is spent each year on Medicaid and Medicare funds health promotion interventions. For the federal and state governments to integrate health promotion programs into health policy requires stronger documentation of such programs' health and financial impact.

 Back to the Table of Contents


THE PROJECT

The 12th Annual Art and Science of Health Promotion Conference, which took place February 12–16, 2001, in Washington, D.C., was the focal point of a multi-pronged effort to address these issues. The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) provided the Health Promotion Research Foundation with a $30,000 grant in partial support for the conference. The grantee organization cosponsored it along with the American Journal of Health Promotion and the Public Health Education and Health Promotion section of the American Public Health Association, the Wellness Councils of America, and the Association for Worksite Health Promotion (now defunct). The American Journal for Health Promotion, located in Keego Harbor, Mich.) organized the conference. The 1998 conference was also supported by RWJF (see Grant Results on ID# 032212).

Over 700 people attended, including individuals from organizations such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and the White House Medical Unit. Keynote speakers included Surgeon General David Satcher, M.D., Ph.D.; Ralph Nader; Kenneth Cooper, M.D.; and Dean Ornish, M.D.

Other Funding

Other funders — with grants ranging from $1,000 to $15,000 — included Johnson and Johnson, Merck and Co., MediFit Corporate Services, and Pfizer.

Conference Theme, Findings and Recommendations

The conference theme "Building Health Promotion into the National Agenda" featured five basic tracks:

  • Best evidence on the health and financial impact of health promotion
  • Best strategies for health promotion
  • Political advocacy
  • Health policy
  • Emerging trends shaping the future of health promotion

Among the conference findings and recommendations were:

  • Health promotion must become an integral part of all elements of society — health care, education, the worksite, neighborhoods, families, and local, state, and federal policy.
  • To achieve this goal requires demonstrating that health promotion can produce long-lasting change, and developing standard research-based protocols that establish which methods work best for all populations, including children, older adults, and others.
  • There is a huge gap between the best programs and the typical ones.
  • To narrow this gap requires providing increased funding for the wide dissemination of current research results and best-practice strategies to all scientists and health promotion practitioners in heath care, the workplace, schools, and other community settings, and to policymakers in public and private sector settings.

Communications

Conference organizers prepared a brief document on the benefits of health promotion and distributed it in meetings with 94 U.S. Senators and 200 congressional representatives or their staff. They also introduced resolutions in the Senate and the House of Representatives, calling for the government to integrate health promotion concepts into all elements of society. American Journal of Health Promotion published three special issues as a result of the conference. (See the Bibliography for details.)

 Back to the Table of Contents


AFTER THE GRANT

To develop specific legislation to advance the basic and applied science of health promotion, an ongoing advocacy effort emerged from the conference that included a coordinating committee, a grassroots advocacy network, and a collaboration made up of over 100 organizations. The grantee organization continues to convene annual Art and Science of Health Promotion conferences.

 Back to the Table of Contents


GRANT DETAILS & CONTACT INFORMATION

Project

Conference on Building Health Promotion into the National Agenda

Grantee

The Health Promotion Research Foundation (Keego Harbor,  MI)

  • Amount: $ 30,000
    Dates: April 2001 to October 2001
    ID#:  040978

Contact

Michael P. O'Donnell, Ph.D.
(248) 682-0707
modonnell@healthpromotionjournal.com

Web Site

http://www.healthpromotionjournal.com

 Back to the Table of Contents


BIBLIOGRAPHY

(Current as of date of this report; as provided by grantee organization; not verified by RWJF; items not available from RWJF.)

Articles

"The Financial Impact of Health Promotion." The American Journal of Health Promotion, 15(5), 2001. Can be ordered online.

"Most Effective Health Promotion Strategies." The American Journal of Health Promotion. Can be ordered online.

"Creating a New Vision for Health Promotion." The American Journal of Health Promotion, 18(12): 143, 2003. Can be ordered online.

Sponsored Conferences

The 12th Annual Art and Science of Health Promotion Conference, sponsored by the American Journal of Health Promotion, the Health Promotion Research Foundation, the Public Health Education and Health Promotion section of the American Public Health Association, the Wellness Councils of America, and the Association for Worksite Health Promotion, February 12–16, 2001. Washington, D.C. Attended by 716 people, including individuals from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Department of Health and Human Services, the IBM Corporation, Johnson and Johnson Healthcare Systems, Merck and Company, the White House Medical Unit, and the U.S. Armed Forces. Four keynote presentations, five two-day training seminars, five half-day preconference workshops, one panel discussion, 28 breakout sessions, and 40 poster presentations.

Keynote Presentations

  • David Satcher, Assistant Secretary for Health and Surgeon General, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (Washington, D.C.). "Role of Health Promotion in our Nation's Health Care Agenda."
  • Ralph Nader, consumer advocate (Washington, D.C.). "Harnessing Proven Advocacy Strategies to Build Health Promotion into the National Agenda."
  • Kenneth Cooper, Chairman, the Cooper Institute (Dallas, Texas). "A National Preventive Medicine Plan."
  • Dean Ornish, President and Director, the Preventive Medicine Research Institute (Sausalito, Calif.). "Translating Health Promotion Science into Law."

 Back to the Table of Contents


Report prepared by: Madeleine J. McComas
Reviewed by: Janet Spencer King
Reviewed by: Molly McKaughan
Program Officer: C. Tracy Orleans

Most Requested