February 2003

Grant Results

SUMMARY

The American Medical Association, Chicago, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF), Princeton, N.J., planned, organized and conducted the 11th World Conference on Tobacco OR Health, which was held in August 2000.

This was the first time since 1975 that the World Conference on Tobacco OR Health, widely recognized as an important forum for international collaboration on tobacco control, had been held in the United States.

Key Results

  • The 11th World Conference on Tobacco OR Health, "Promoting A Future Without Tobacco," the largest tobacco-control conference in history, took place in Chicago on August 6–11, 2000. The conference was the venue for release of "Reducing Tobacco Use: A Report of the Surgeon General."

    The three major themes of the conference program were:
    1. Are We Winning? Appraising Progress and Celebrating Success
    2. Nicotine: The Present and the Future
    3. Advocacy in Action: How to Mobilize Tobacco Control Activities within Countries and Create a Global Advocacy Movement.

    More than 5,000 people representing more than 173 countries attended the conference. Key dignitaries attending included:
    • Honorary Conference Co-Chairs World Health Organization (WHO) Director General Gro Harlem Brundtland, M.D.
    • Former U.S. Surgeon General C. Everett Koop, M.D.
    • Canadian Health Minister Allan Rock, L.L.B.
    • Then-U.S. Surgeon General David Satcher, M.D., Ph.D.
  • The conference partially or totally subsidized 127 Conference Scholars from developing countries and 173 Leadership Scholars, some from developing countries, who also took part in a preconference three-day skill building training program.
  • Conference planners awarded 41 seed grants of up to $10,000 apiece for community-based tobacco-control projects gleaned from this pool of scholars, and it initiated the inaugural Luther L. Terry Awards, the first international awards for exemplary leadership in tobacco control.
  • The national and international media covered the conference, with a total of 153 reporters from 94 media outlets in attendance.

Funding
RWJF provided partial support for the conference through four grants totaling $1,991,873 between May 1996 and December 2002.

 See Grant Detail & Contact Information
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RWJF STRATEGY

The World Conference on Tobacco OR Health (WCTOH) has been widely recognized as an important forum for international collaboration on tobacco control and as a stimulus for national efforts in this field.

Holding the conference in the United States, something that had not occurred since 1975, would mean that many more American tobacco-control researchers and activists, including RWJF grantees, could attend and learn from the experiences of other countries. Furthermore, the year 2000, the year scheduled for the 11th WCTOH, was a particularly significant one for the U.S. tobacco-control movement because it was the target date former Surgeon General Everett Koop had set in the late 1980s for a smoke-free society.

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THE PROJECT

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) made grant ID# 029398 to the American Medical Association (AMA) to plan and present a bid to host the 11th WCTOH in this country. Working in collaboration with the American Cancer Society (ACS), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the National Cancer Institute, in 1996 the AMA and RWJF submitted a successful bid to the International Liaison Committee on Tobacco and Health (the committee of the International Union Against Cancer that decides on conference locations). RWJF funded the next three grants for the planning, organizing and implementation of the 11th WCTOH.

Grant ID# 029689 to the AMA supported its partnering with RWJF and ACS to act as co-hosts of the 11th WCTOH. AMA and RWJF established a conference secretariat at its Chicago headquarters and assembled an executive committee that included RWJF, the American Heart Association, American Lung Association, the National Cancer Institute and CDC, as well as a program committee, which included, in addition to the federal agencies, medical specialty societies, state and local public health groups and others. (See Appendix 1 for executive committee members and Appendix 2 for program committee members.) ACS assumed fund-raising and marketing responsibilities; RWJF headed conference programming.

Grant ID#s 036507 and 039809 supported RWJF's work in organizing and implementing the conference program. The purpose of the conference was to strengthen and expand national, regional and global leadership networks for tobacco use prevention and control. Its goals were to:

  1. Encourage the sharing of information and ideas.
  2. Develop a consensus on global approaches to tobacco control.
  3. Provide networking opportunities among national and community health leaders from every health discipline.
  4. Identify new ways to use technology in the fight against tobacco.

The three major themes of the conference program were:

  1. Are We Winning? Appraising Progress and Celebrating Success
  2. Nicotine: The Present and the Future
  3. Advocacy in Action: How to Mobilize Tobacco Control Activities within Countries and Create a Global Advocacy Movement.

RWJF subdivided the program further into 10 content-driven "tracks" made up of 40 to 50 sessions each. Content tracks were:

  1. Addiction science
  2. Advocacy
  3. Cessation and dependence treatment
  4. Communications
  5. Cultural approaches to tobacco control and international activity
  6. Expanding the movement
  7. Fund-raising
  8. Nicotine and the tobacco industry
  9. Prevention
  10. Public policy

Two programming subcommittee chairs coordinated each track heading; additionally, program subcommittees included representatives from over 100 countries. (See Appendix 3.) In keeping with the resolutions of the 10th WCTOH, the gender and geographic representation of committee members as well as all speakers, presenters and moderators were balanced. Geographically, this meant that 50 percent came from countries with active tobacco-control movements and 50 percent from those with little or no tobacco-control policies or procedures.

Conference officials contracted with the Chicago offices of the production company Media Projects to provide high-quality slides and videos for presentations, and with the public relations firm MWW Group to develop national and international media interest in the conference.

A wide spectrum of other funders, including ACS, the American Legacy Foundation, Pharmacia and the United Nations Foundation/WHO, supplied major grant and in-kind support totaling nearly $8 million of the WCTOH's $10 million budget. (See Appendix 4 for a list of core supporters.) To identify needs and more funding sources, ACS created the resource acquisition committee that worked with two fund-raising firms.

Additional revenue came from networking and business meetings, which conference planners arranged to take place during the conference. Some 50 independent organizations participated; among others, these groups included the American Dental Association, Tobacco Products Liability Project; the RWJF national program SmokeLess States®, which supports development and implementation of comprehensive statewide strategies to reduce tobacco use through education, treatment and policy initiatives; the CDC Office on Smoking and Health; and WHO. Five industry-sponsored symposia produced further conference revenue. By conference end, organizers reported a surplus of approximately $400,000, most of which they were able to transfer as core funding to the 12th WCTOH.

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RESULTS

  • The 11th WCTOH, "Promoting A Future Without Tobacco," the largest tobacco-control conference in history, took place in Chicago on August 6–11, 2000. Over 5,000 people representing more than 173 countries attended the conference, including health professionals, tobacco-control advocates, academicians, epidemiologists, health educators, public health officials and the media. Key dignitaries in attendance included Honorary Conference Co-Chairs WHO Director General Gro Harlem Brundtland, M.D., and former U.S. Surgeon General C. Everett Koop, M.D.; Canadian Health Minister Allan Rock, L.L.B.; U.S. Surgeon General David Satcher, M.D., Ph.D.; South African Health Minister M. Tshabalala-Msimang, M.D., M.P.H.; World Bank Managing Director Mamphela Ramphele, M.D., Ph.D.; and U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services Donna Shalala, Ph.D.. Nearly 2,500 people took part in conference presentations.
  • The conference provided the venue for release of several important reports and publications, including "Reducing Tobacco Use: A Report of the Surgeon General," as well as special issues of the Journal of the American Medical Association, British Medical Journal and other journals devoted to tobacco control and cessation.
  • To stimulate expansion of the tobacco-control movement, the conference partially or totally subsidized 300 first-time attendees — 127 Conference Scholars from developing countries and 173 Leadership Scholars — who also took part in a preconference three-day skill-building program. This training program, organized by the CDC and sponsored by RWJF, the United Nations Foundation and WHO, included such topics as communicating effectively, data collection and fund-raising. Conference planners awarded 41 seed grants of up to $10,000 each, for a total of $384,000, for community-based tobacco-control projects developed by these scholars; a portion of the award was received during the grant period and the balance afterward. Among the projects were: an intervention study to assess the impact of second-hand smoke in public places in Chad (Ghana); an anti-tobacco training program for rural doctors in Pakistan; and production and distribution of a tobacco-control publication and Web site in Romania. (See Appendix 5 for complete list.)
  • The conference initiated the inaugural Luther L. Terry Awards, the first international awards for exemplary leadership in tobacco control. Underwritten in part by ACS, five awards were given from more than 300 nominations. Awardees were: Outstanding Individual Leadership (shared), Judith Mackay, M.D., Hong Kong, and Prakit Vateestokit, M.D., Thailand; Outstanding Organization, Garfield Mahood, M.D., of the Non-Smokers Rights Association, Toronto; Outstanding Leadership by a Ministry, M. Tshabalala-Msimang, M.D., South Africa; and the Distinguished Career Award (shared) to Kjell Bjartveit, M.D., Norway, and Nigel Gray, M.D., Australia.
  • The International Resolutions Committee, with input from all conference attendees, released the final resolutions for the 11th WCTOH. These were:
    • That all governments, as part of a comprehensive tobacco-control program, include effective cessation methods, and that these be made available and affordable in all countries.
    • That the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control be strong, driven by public health considerations, not preclude nations from adopting stronger measures and fully integrate NGOs working for tobacco control in the process.
    • That the international tobacco-control community work vigorously to exclude and remove tobacco and tobacco products from bilateral and multilateral trade agreements that would have negative public health consequences.
    • That all national ministries should have full-time staff charged with overall responsibility for ensuring sustained country tobacco-control programs.

Communications

A total of 153 reporters attended the conference from 94 media outlets, including the Wall Street Journal, Los Angeles Times, Financial Times and the Reuters and Associated Press wire services; internationally, reporters attended from Wales, Belgium, France, Norway, Netherlands, Italy, Poland and Japan. Television coverage included a segment on ABC World News Tonight; National Public Radio and BBC radio provided coverage, as did Radio Bilingual, which broadcast a program each day during the conference to Hispanic listeners at over 83 radio stations in the United States and Puerto Rico. Web-casting of the conference, with real-time moving images and sounds of the proceedings, appeared on the conference Web site, funded and produced by HealthAnswers, a health care marketing firm in North Wales, Pa.; the Web site continues to provides archives of conference presentations.

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LESSONS LEARNED

  1. Staffing requirements for a conference of this magnitude need thorough analysis and planning. Project directors and co-host organizations agreed that they grossly underestimated the responsibilities and expectations of conference organizers. (Project Director)
  2. Innovations concerning presentation formats made it possible to enhance their overall level of quality despite large numbers of culturally diverse presenters and presentations. These included limiting presentations to no more than six visual images per 15 minutes, and having on-site facilities for presenters to meet with audio visual professionals for review and, when necessary, revision, of their speaker support materials. (Project Director)

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AFTER THE GRANT

Conference planners continue to follow seed grant projects for which scholar recipients have submitted six-month progress reports to qualify for the balance of their awards.

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GRANT DETAILS & CONTACT INFORMATION

Project

Program Activities for the 11th World Conference on Tobacco OR Health (WCTOH)

Grantee

American Medical Association (Chicago,  IL)

  • Planning for the 11th World Conference on Tobacco OR Health (WCTOH)
    Amount: $ 29,042
    Dates: May 1996 to June 1997
    ID#:  029398

  • Hosting the 11th WCTOH
    Amount: $ 494,068
    Dates: January 1997 to December 2000
    ID#:  029689

Contact

Thomas P. Houston, M.D.
(312) 464-5957
Thomas Houston@ama-assn.org

Grantee

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (Princeton,  NJ)

  • Program Activities for the 11th World Conference on Tobacco OR Health (WCTOH)
    Amount: $ 718,763
    Dates: March 1999 to March 2000
    ID#:  036507

  • Amount: $ 750,000
    Dates: July 2000 to December 2002
    ID#:  039809

Contact

Nancy J. Kaufman, R.N., M.S.
(609) 627-5972
nkaufma@rwjf.org

Web Site

http://www.wctoh.org

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APPENDICES


Appendix 1

(Current as of the time of the grant; provided by the grantee organization; not verified by RWJF.)

Executive Committee of the 11th WCTOH

Allan C. Erickson, Co-Chair
Senior Consultant to the CEO
American Cancer Society
Atlanta, Ga.

Thomas P. Houston, M.D., Co-Chair
Director, Science and Public Health Advocacy Programs
American Medical Association
Chicago, Ill.

Cathy Backinger, M.P.H., Ph.D.
Acting Chief, Tobacco Control Research Branch
National Cancer Institute
Rockville, Md.

Mike Heron
National Vice President for International Affairs
American Cancer Society
Atlanta, Ga.

Michael P. Eriksen, Sc.D.
Director, Office on Smoking and Health
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Atlanta, Ga.

Michelle A. Larkin, R.N., M.S.
Program Associate
The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
Princeton, N.J.

Nancy J. Kaufman, R.N., M.S.
Vice President
The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
Princeton, N.J.

Allen Rubin
Consultant, Tobacco Control
Ridgewood, N.J.

Brigid McHugh Sanner
American Heart Association
Dallas, Texas

Sallie Anne Petrucci
Program Assistant
The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
Princeton, N.J.

Anne Jenkins (ex officio)
Conference Manager, 11th World Conference on Tobacco OR Health
American Medical Association
Chicago, Ill.

Richard Hamburg
Director of Government Relations
American Heart Association
Washington, D.C.


Appendix 2

(Current as of the time of the grant; provided by the grantee organization; not verified by RWJF.)

Executive Program Committee of the 11th WCTOH

Nancy J. Kaufman, R.N., M.S., Chair
Vice President, The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
Princeton, N.J.

Barry Bleidt, Ph.D., Pharm.D., R.Ph.
Director of Experiential Education/Clinical Coordinator
School of Pharmacy
Hampton University
Hampton, Va.

Michelle A. Larkin, R.N., M.S.
Program Associate
The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
Princeton, N.J.

Judith Glanz
Manager of International Issues
National Center for Tobacco-Free Kids
Washington, D.C.

Sallie Anne Petrucci
Program Assistant
The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
Princeton, N.J.

Anne Jenkins
Conference Manager, 11th World Conference on Tobacco OR Health
American Medical Association
Chicago, Ill.

Allen Rubin
Consultant, Tobacco Control
Ridgewood, N.J.


Appendix 3

(Current as of the time of the grant; provided by the grantee organization; not verified by RWJF.)

Subcommittee Members of the 11th WCTOH

1. Skill-Building Workshops

Phillip Wilbur, Co-Chair
R.O.W. Sciences
Rockville, Md.

Karla Sneegas, Co-Chair
Consultant, Tobacco Control
Indianapolis, Ind.

David Simpson, Lead International Liaison
International Agency on Tobacco and Health
London, United Kingdom

Terry Pechacek
Office on Smoking and Health
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Atlanta, Ga.

Peter H. Fisher
Manager, State Issues
National Center for Tobacco-Free Kids
Washington, D.C.

Julia Carol
Americans for Nonsmokers Rights
Berkeley, Calif.

Kay Arndorfer
Advocacy Institute
Washington, D.C.

Myra Wisotzky
Program Consultant
Office on Smoking and Health
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Atlanta, Ga.

Sandra Headen
Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Chapel Hill, N.C.

Serena Chen
American Lung Association of East Bay
Oakland, Calif.

Mike Fiore
Center for Tobacco Research and Intervention
University of Wisconsin Medical School
Madison, Wis.

Elaine Bratic Arkin
Health Communication Consultant
Arlington, Va.

Rosemary Romano
Senior Health Communication Specialist
Academy for Educational Development
Washington, D.C.

Judy Sopenski
STAT — Stop Teenage Addiction to Tobacco, Northeastern University
Boston, Mass.

Steve Sussman
Department of Preventive Medicine
Institute for Health Promotion
University of Southern California
Los Angeles, Calif.

Charyn Sutton
The Onyx Group
Bala Cynwyd, Pa.

Michael Schooley
Office on Smoking and Health
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Atlanta, Ga.

Beatriz M. Champagne
InterAmerican Heart Foundation
Dallas, Texas

Russ Sciandra
Center for a Tobacco Free New York
Albany, N.Y.

Makani Themba-Nixon
Grass Roots Innovative Policy Program
Roanoke, Va.

JoDe Walp
Program Consultant
Office on Smoking and Health
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Atlanta, Ga.

Robert W. Moon
American Cancer Society
Atlanta, Ga.

Bill Lynn
National Cancer Institute
Tobacco Control Research Branch
Bethesda, Md.

Ron Todd
American Cancer Society
Tobacco Control
Atlanta, Ga.

Sue Lin Yee
Program Analyst
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Atlanta, Ga.

Tampani Piha
Finish EU Representation
Brussels, Finland

Harley Stanton
Tobacco and Cancer Program
International Union Against Cancer
Wahroonga, Australia

Yussuff Soloojee
National Council Against Smoking
Joubert Park, South Africa

Mary Assunta
Consumers' Association of Penan
Pulau Pinang (Penang), Malaysia

Natasha Adrianza de Herrera
Inter-Country Consultant
Pan American Health Organization/World Health Organization
Caracas, Venezuela

Cristina Perez
National Cancer Institute of Brazil
Rio de Janiero, Brazil

2. Scenarios-in-the-Round

John Bloom, Co-Chair
Tobacco Policy Consultant
Arlington, Va.

Sally Malek, Co-Chair
Project ASSIST
Raleigh, N.C.

Karen Slama, Lead International Liaison
Tobacco Prevention Division
International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease and
International Non-Governmental Coalition Against Tobacco
Paris, France

Gary A. Giovino
Department of Cancer Prevention, Epidemiology, and Biostatistics
Roswell Park Cancer Institute
Buffalo, N.Y.

Samira Asma
Office on Smoking and Health
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Atlanta, Ga.

Robert Weissman
Essential Action
Center for Study of Responsive Law
Washington, D.C.

Scott Ballin
Health Policy Consultant
Washington, D.C.

Amber Thornton
Public and Community Health Promotion
Prospect Associates
Silver Spring, Md.

Nigel Gray
International Union Against Cancer
Division of Epidemiology & Biostatistics
European Institute of Oncology
Milan, Italy

3. Debates

Michele Bloch, Chair
National Cancer Institute
Washington, D.C.

Matthew Myers
National Center for Tobacco-Free Kids
Washington, D.C.

Andre Stanley
SmokeLess States
American Medical Association
Chicago, Ill.

Jeanne Weigum
Association for Nonsmokers — Minnesota
St. Paul, Minn.

Jerrie Jordan
Office on Smoking and Health
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Atlanta, Ga.

Mildred Morse
National Tobacco Independence Campaign
Silver Spring, Md.

Annie Sasco
IARC
Programme of Epidemiology for Cancer Prevention
Lyon, France

Clifford Douglas
Tobacco Control Law and Policy Consulting
Ann Arbor, Mich.

Judith Mackay
Asian Consultancy on Tobacco Control
Sai Kung Kowloon, Hong Kong

Simon Chapman
Department of Public Health & Community Medicine
University of Sydney
Sydney, Australia

4. Cultural Approaches

Jeannette Noltenius, Chair
Latino Council on Alcohol and Tobacco
Washington, D.C.

Karen Lewis, Lead International Liaison
World Health Organization
Washington Liaison Office
Washington, D.C.

Stephanie Maya
Office on Smoking and Health
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Atlanta, Ga.

Rev. Jesse Brown, Jr.
National Association of African Americans for Positive Imagery
Bala Cynwyd, Pa.

Bob Robinson
Office on Smoking and Health
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Atlanta, Ga.

Rod Lew
Association of Asian Pacific Community Health Organizations
Oakland, Calif.

Lawrence Shorty
Native Tobacco People
Albuquerque, N.M.

Kim Birnie
Hawaii State Primary Care
Honolulu, Hawaii

Liling Sherry
Northwest Portland Area Indian Health Board
Portland, Ore.

Charyn Sutton
The Onyx Group
Bala Cynwyd, Pa.

Sora Park Tanjasiri
University of California – Irvine
North Hollywood, Calif.

Enrique Madrigal
Pan-American Health Organization
Washington, D.C.

Prakash Gupta
Tata Institute of Fundamental Research
Mumbai, India

Barbara Benavente
Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse
Tamuning, Guam

Edward Kanyesigye
Human Resources Development
Ministry of Health
Kampala, Uganda

5. Ancillary Meetings/Poster Sessions

Barry Bleidt, Chair
School of Pharmacy
Hampton University
Hampton, Va.

Allan Erickson
American Cancer Society
Atlanta, Ga.

Sallie Petrucci
The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
Princeton, N.J.

Mary Ayesse
American Medical Association
Chicago, Ill.

Susan Bailey
Raleigh, N.C.

6. Exhibits

Allen Rubin, Chair
Consultant, Tobacco Control
Ridgewood, N.J.

Anne Jenkins
American Medical Association
Chicago, Ill.

7. Social Event/Plenaries

Nancy Kaufman, Chair
The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
Princeton, N.J.

Anne Jenkins
American Medical Association
Chicago, Ill.

Sallie Petrucci
The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
Princeton, N.J.

Thomas Houston
American Medical Association
Chicago, Ill.

Michelle Larkin
The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
Princeton, N.J.

Karen Gerlach
The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
Princeton, N.J.

8. Addiction Science

Jack Henningfield, Chair
Pinney Associates
Bethesda, Md.

Karl Olov Fagerstrom, Lead International Liaison
Fagerstrom Consulting
Helsingborg, Sweden

William Corrigall
Smoking and Nicotine Dependence Research
Centre for Addiction & Mental Health
Toronto, Canada

Marina Picciotto
Department of Psychiatry
Yale University School of Medicine
New Haven, Conn.

Kenneth Perkins
Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic
University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine
Pittsburgh, Pa.

Maxine Stitzer
Johns Hopkins University
Behavioral Pharmacology Research Unit/Psychiatry
Baltimore, Md.

Kathleen Merikangas
Genetic Epidemiology Research Unit
Yale University School of Medicine
New Haven, Conn.

Bridgette Garrett
Office on Smoking and Health
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Atlanta, Ga.

Rachel Tyndale
Department of Pharmacology
University of Toronto
Toronto, Canada

Joy Schmitz
University of Texas
Houston, Texas

David Balfour
Department of Psychiatry
University of Dundee Medical School, Ninewells Hospital
Dundee, Scotland

Jacques Le Houezec
Paris, France

Robyn Richmond
University of New South Wales
Department of Community Medicine
Kensington, Sydney, Australia

9. Prevention

Donna Grande, Chair
SmokeLess States
American Medical Association
Chicago, Ill.

Shosh Gan-Noy, Lead International Liaison
Israel Cancer Association
Information and Education Department
Givatayim, Israel

Cheryl Perry
University of Minnesota
Minneapolis, Minn.

Brian Flay
Health Research and Policy Centers
University of Illinois at Chicago
Chicago, Ill.

Robin Mermelstein
Prevention Research Center
School of Public Health
University of Illinois
Chicago, Ill.

Gil Botvin
The Institute for Prevention Research
Cornell University Medical College
New York, N.Y.

Nancy Rigotti
Division of General Medicine
Massachusetts General Hospital
Boston, Mass.

Thomas Glynn
American Cancer Society
Washington, D.C.

James R. Williams
Center for Communication Programs
Johns Hopkins University
Baltimore, Md.

Carol Miller
Global Health Council
Washington, D.C.

Joyce Holfeld
USAID, Bureau for Policy and Program Coordination
Washington, D.C.

Anne Marie Holen
Alaska Native Health Board
Anchorage, Alaska

Cecilia Sepulveda
Metropolitan Area Regional Office, Ministry of Health
St. Lucia, Santiago, Chile

Bung-on Rathinpakdee
Action on Smoking and Health Foundation
Payathai, Bangkok, Thailand

Katherine Everett
Cancer Associate of South Africa
Health Promotion Division
Rondebosch, Cape Town, South Africa

Antonio E.F. D'Aguiar
San Paulo, Brazil

10. Cessation

Harriett V. Bennett
Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality
Rockville, Md.

Lu Rushan, Lead International Liaison
Chinese Association on Smoking and Health
Institute of Medical Information
Beijing, China

Tracy Orleans
The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
Princeton, N.J.

Margaret Kotz
Cleveland Clinic Foundation
Cleveland, Ohio

John Hughes
Department of Psychology
University of Vermont
Burlington, Vt.

Ellen Gritz
University of Texas
M.D. Anderson Cancer Center
Houston, Texas

Terry Rustin
Houston, Texas

Judy Ockene
Division of Preventive and Behavioral Medicine
University of Massachusetts Medical School
Worcester, Mass.

Lori Karan
Division of Clinical Pharmacology & Experimental Therapeutics
University of California at San Francisco
San Francisco, Calif.

Jasjit S. Ahluwalia
Department of Preventive Medicine
University of Kansas School of Medicine
Kansas City, Kan.

Alvina Bey Bennett
A. Bey Bennett & Associates
Glen Allen, Va.

Ernestine Murray
Agency for Health Care Policy and Research
Center for Practice and Technology Assessment
Rockville, Md.

Martin Raw
Kings College School of Medicine and Dentistry
University of London
London, United Kingdom

Mira Aghi
International Development Research Center
New Delhi, India

11. Nicotine and The Tobacco Industry

Gregory Connolly, Co-Chair
Massachusetts Department of Public Health
The Massachusetts Tobacco Program
Boston, Mass.

John Slade, Co-Chair (deceased)
New Jersey School of Public Health
New Brunswick, N.J.

Vijay L. Lahiri, Lead International Liaison
Pathology Center
Dr. Sarkar Nursing Home Enclave
Delhi Gate
Agra, India

Lisa Bero
Institute for Health Policy Studies
University of California, San Francisco
San Francisco, Calif.

Mike Cummings
Program Department of Cancer Control and Epidemiology
Memorial Institute
Buffalo, N.Y.

Roberta Walburn
Robins, Kaplan, Miller & Ciresi
Minneapolis, Minn.

Ross Hammond
Hammond & Purcell Consulting
San Francisco, Calif.

Gallege Punyawardena Alvis
Swarna Hansa Foundation
Dehiwala, Sri Lanka

Timothy Stamps
Health and Child Welfare
Causeway, Zimbabwe

Gunilla Bolinder
Department of Nephrology
Karolinska Hospital and Institute
Radiumhemmet, Stockholm, Sweden

12. Advocacy

Michael Pertschuk, Chair
Advocacy Institute
Washington, D.C.

Mary Assunta, Lead International Liaison
Consumers' Association of Penan
Pulau Pinang, (Penang), Malaysia

Kay Arndorfer
Advocacy Institute
Washington, D.C.

Stanton Glantz
University of California, San Francisco
San Francisco, Calif.

Theresa Gardella
Advocacy Institute
Washington, D.C.

Scott Ballin
Health Policy Consultant
Washington, D.C.

Lucinda Wykle-Rosenberg
INFACT
Boston, Mass.

Rich Hamburg
American Heart Association
Washington, D.C.

Kenneth Warner
University of Michigan
Department of Public Health Policy
Ann Arbor, Mich.

Peter Fisher
National Center for Tobacco-Free Kids
Washington, D.C.

Karen Lewis
World Health Organization
Washington Liaison Office
Washington, D.C.

Fran Dumelle
American Lung Association
Washington, D.C.

Gar Mahood
Non-Smokers' Rights Association and the related
Smoking and Health Action Foundation
Toronto, Canada

Anna White
Senegalese Anti-Tobacco NGO Federation
Takoma Park, Md.

Seth Winick
American Cancer Society
Washington, D.C.

Simon Chapman
Department of Public Health & Community Medicine
University of Sydney
Sydney, Australia

Fenton Howell
Action on Smoking and Health
Dublin, Republic of Ireland

13. Public Policy

Kathleen Harty, Co-Chair
Minnesota Partnerships for Action Against Tobacco
St. Paul, Minn.

Richard Daynard, Co-Chair
Tobacco Control Resource Center
Boston, Mass.

Rose Vaithinathan, Lead International Liaison
Institute of Health, Administrative Health
Singapore

Michael Eriksen,
Office on Smoking and Health
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Atlanta, Ga.

Kenneth Warner
Department of Public Health Policy
University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, Mich.

Robin Hobart
Americans for Nonsmoker Rights
Berkeley, Calif.

Donald Shopland
National Cancer Institute
Rockville, Md.

Jean Forster
University of Minnesota School of Public Health
Division of Epidemiology
Minneapolis, Minn.

Ross Hammond
Tobacco Free Project
San Francisco Department of Public Health
San Francisco, Calif.

Frances Stillman
Department of Cancer Prevention and Control
National Cancer Institute
Rockville, Md.

Margaret Chan
Department of Health
Wu Chung House
Wanchai, Hong Kong

Cheryl Perry
University of Minnesota School of Public Health
Division of Epidemiology
Minneapolis, Minn.

Mitchell Zeller, J.D.
Director, Office of Tobacco
Food and Drug Administration
Rockville, Md.

Zarihah bte. Dato' Mohd. Zain
Ministry of Health Malaysia
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Rowena Van Der Merwe
School of Economics
University of York
Heslington, York, United Kingdom

David Sweanor
Non-Smokers' Rights Association
Ottowa, Canada

Antonio Eduardo F. D'Aguiar
World Conference
San Paulo, Brazil

Witold Zatonski
The Maria-Asklodowska Memorial Cancer Center
Warsaw, Poland

14. Communications

Kay Kahler Vose, Chair
National Center for Tobacco-Free Kids
Washington, D.C.

Rosalie Lopez Hirano
Arizona Department of Health
Tobacco Education Prevention Program
Phoenix, Ariz.

Patricia Avila de Hails, Lead International Liaison
CLACCTA. Apartado Aereo
Bogota, Columbia

Mark Palmer
Capital Development Co
Washington, D.C.

Anne Miller
Arnold Communications
Boston, Mass.

Joseph Marx
The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
Princeton, N.J.

Jeff McKenna
Office on Smoking and Health
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Atlanta, Ga.

Andrew Mikolajczyk
Success in Your Hands, Radio WPNA
Chicago Ill.

David Hill
Center for Behavioral Research in Cancer
Anti-Cancer Council of Victoria
Carlton South, Victoria, Australia

M. R. Pandey
Mrigeuda Samjhana Medical Trust
Thapathali, Kathmandu, Nepal
Kathmandu, Nepal

Nobuko Nakano
Women's Action on Smoking
Tokyo, Japan

Barbara Smith
Fiji Health Promotion Project
National Centre for Health Promotion
Suva, Fiji

Susan Goldstein
Research and Development, Soul City
Johannesburg, South Africa

Mira Aghi
International Development Research Centre
New Delhi, India

Ruben Israel
GLOBALink Information Services
International Union Against Cancer
Geneva, Switzerland

Amanda Amos
University of Edinburgh
Department of Community Medical School
Edinburgh, U.K.

Bill Novelli
National Center for Tobacco-Free Kids
Washington, D.C.

15. Expanding the Movement

Deborah McLellan, Chair
Center for Community Based Research
Dana Farber Cancer Institute
Boston, Mass.

Harley Stanton, Lead International Liaison
World Health Organization
Western Pacific Regional Office
Manila, Philippines

Judith Glanz
National Center for Tobacco-Free Kids
Washington, D.C.

Sushma Palmer
Center for Communications, Health and the Environment
Washington, D.C.

Roy Branson
Inter-Religious Coalition on Smoking or Health
Washington, D.C.

Lila Johnson
Honolulu, Hawaii

Todd Johnson
Allina Health System
Minneapolis, Minn.

Linda Sarna
University of California, Los Angeles, School of Nursing
Los Angeles, Calif.

Anthony So
Health Sciences Division
The Rockefeller Foundation
New York, N.Y.

Elaine Wolfson
Global Alliance for Women's Health
New York, N.Y.

Heidi Rathjen
Coalition Quelbecoise pour le Controle du Tabac
Montreal, Canada

Jerald Newberry
National Education Association
Health Information Network
Washington, D.C.

Elizabeth Barbeau
Dana Farber Cancer Institute
Boston, Mass. 

Michele Hodak
National Education Association
Health Information Network
Washington, D.C.

Richard Youngstrom
Dana Farber Cancer Institute
Boston, Mass.

Glorian Sorenson
Dana Farber Cancer Institute
Boston, Mass.

Charles Levenstein
University of Massachusetts at Lowell
Lowell, Mass.

Marewa Glover
Maori Smokefree Coalition
Auckland, New Zealand

Eduardo Siqueira
University of Massachusetts at Lowell
Lowell, Mass.

Ingrid Talu
Swedish Teachers Against Tobacco
Stockholm, Sweden

Margaretha Haglund
National Institute of Public Health
Folkhalsoinstitutet
Stockholm, Sweden

16. Fund-Raising

Dileep G. Bal, Chair
Cancer Control Branch
California Department of Health Services
Sacramento, Calif.

Derek Yach, Lead International Liaison
World Health Organization
Tobacco Free Initiative
Geneva, Switzerland

Delfina Caballero
Cancer Control Branch
California Department of Health Services
Sacramento, Calif.

Samira Asma
Epidemiology Branch, Office on Smoking and Health
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Atlanta, Ga.

Robin Shimizu
Cancer Control Branch
California Department of Health Services
Sacramento, Calif.

Mohammad Torabi
Department of Applied Health Sciences
Indiana University – Bloomington
Bloomington, Ind.

Carol M. Russell
Tobacco Control Section
California Department of Health Services
Sacramento, Calif.

Tom Kean
Strategic Health Concepts
Englewood, Colo.

Beatriz Champagne
InterAmerican Heart Foundation
Dallas, Texas

Linda Brigden
Research for International Tobacco Control
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

Almarie Wagner
American Heart Association
Chicago, Ill.

Becky Burkett
Resource Acquisition
American Cancer Society
Atlanta, Ga.

Albert Hirsch
Hospital Saint-Louis
Paris, France

Chitra Subramaniam
World Health Organization
Geneva, Switzerland


Appendix 4

(Current as of the time of the grant; provided by the grantee organization; not verified by RWJF.)

Core Funding Sponsors of the 11th WCTOH

Hosts

  • American Medical Association, $100,000
  • American Cancer Society, $452,047
  • The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, $1,993,526

Cosponsors

  • American Heart Association, $125,000
  • American Lung Association, $25,000
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, $98,500
  • National Cancer Institute, $100,000
  • United Nations Foundation/World Health Organization, $380,000

Honorary Host

  • American Legacy Foundation, $850,000

Primary Patrons

  • Glaxo Wellcome, $200,000
  • HealthAnswers, $250,000
  • Pharmacia, $329,983
  • SmithKline Beecham Consumer Healthcare, $46,800

Contributing Partners

  • Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, $50,000
  • American Cancer Society Foundation, $302,047
  • Environmental Protection Agency, $50,000
  • Food and Drug Administration, $100,000
  • International Union Against Cancer, $25,000
  • National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, $100,000
  • National Institute on Drug Abuse, $100,000
  • Rockefeller Foundation, $100,000
  • World Heart Federation, unknown

Collaborating Partners

  • American Academy of Family Physicians, $5,000
  • American Cancer Society Eastern Division, unknown
  • American Cancer Society California Division, $20,000
  • American Cancer Society Mid-Atlantic Division , $5,000
  • American Cancer Society Midwest Division, $10,000
  • American Cancer Society Northwest Division , unknown
  • American Cancer Society Southeast Division , unknown
  • American Cancer Society Texas – Hawaii Division, unknown
  • American College of Chest Physicians, $5,000
  • American College of Cardiology, $5,000
  • American Dental Association, $5,000
  • American Public Health Association, $6,000
  • Arizonans Concerned About Smoking, $15,000
  • Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Minnesota, $10,000
  • California Department of Health, $35,000
  • Canadian Cancer Society, $15,000
  • Cancer Foundation of Western Australia, $10,000
  • Eli Lilly, $22,500
  • Fogerty International Center, unknown
  • Hampton University School of Pharmacy, unknown
  • Health Canada, $3,311
  • Joyce Foundation, $10,000
  • M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, $35,000
  • Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, $40,000
  • National Center for Tobacco-Free Kids, $20,000
  • National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, $10,000
  • National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, $5,000
  • The Nixon Group, $10,000
  • Roswell Park Cancer Institute, unknown
  • Scholastic, $15,000
  • Stanley and Susan Rosenblatt, $5,000
  • Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, unknown


Appendix 5

(Current as of the time of the grant; provided by the grantee organization; not verified by RWJF.)

Awardees of the Health Seed Grant Program

Tuduetso Ramokate
Ministry of Health, Botswana:
Tobacco Control Program Activities

Elhadj Daouda
Organization for the Defense of Consumers, Chad
Reinforcement of the Fight Against the Tobacco in Chad

Edith Wellington,
Ministry of Health, Ghana
Smoking in Public Places in the Greater Accra Region, Chad

John Kapito
Consumers Association of Malawi, Malawi
Title of project unknown

Adenike Onibokun
Loa Marinho Cancer Center, Nigeria
Training of Smoking Cessation Skills and Establishment of Community-Based Smoking Cessation Center

Edward Kanyesigye
Ministry of Health. Uganda
Activities of the Tobacco Control Capacity Building

Eduardo Laura
Asociacion Argentina de Educacion y Prevention, Argentina
Health Professional Training on Smoking Patient Counseling in Bahia Blanca, Argentina

Samuel Deane
Ministry of Health, Barbados
Heightening Awareness of Adolescents to the Dangers of Tobacco Use

Renata Affonso
Redeh/Cemina, Brazil
Strengthening Community Leadership in Tobacco Control Through the Use of Radio in Brazil

Rosa Duran Sabogal
Ministry of Health, Colombia
Healthy Schools Without Smoke

Patricia Varona
Hygiene and Epidemiology National Institute, Cuba
Trabajadores de la Atencion Primaria de Salud en la Prevencion y Control Del Tabaquismo en Centro Habana

Carmen Barco
Center of Information & Educcation for the Prevention of Drug Abuse, Peru
Tobacco Prevention and Control Program in Workplaces

Ricardo Granero
ASCARDIO, Venezuela
Global Youth Tobacco Survey in Venezuela

Nizal Sarraf-Zadegan
Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Iran
A Comprehensive Tobacco Control and Prevention Program among Iranian Women and Adolescents

Muna Hamzeh
Ministry of Health, Jordan
Anti-Smoking Campaign among Jordanian Youth for the Year 2001

Rehana Maher
Jinnah Post Graduate Medical Center, Pakistan
Epidemiological Studies on Smoking & Chewing Tobacco

Saeed Majeed
Ul–Pakistan Anti-Tobacco Association, Pakistan
Anti-Smoking Campaign Through Family Physicians in the North West Frontier Province (Pakistan)

Ali Idris
Toombak and Smoking Research Centre, Sudan
Strengthening Infrastructure of Toombak and Smoking Research Center

Bassam Abou-Alzaha
Ministry of Health, Syria
Establishment of National Program for 500 — Women Training on Health Education of Smoking in Women

Methody Methodiev
Bulgarian Association for School Health, Bulgaria
"Chance for Change" (Advocacy Campaign for Tobacco Use Restrictions and Regulation)

Tibor Szilagyi
Health 21 Hungarian Foundation, Hungary
Training on Policy and Media Advocacy for Emerging Hungarian Tobacco Control Advocates using the Intensive and Participatory, Institute Model

Cornel Radu-Loghin
AER PUR ROMANIA, Romania
Tobacco Control in Romania

Natalia Alexeeva
Institute of Internal Medicine, Russia
Smoking Prevention in School Children

Elena Kavcova
Jessenius Medical Faculty, Comenius University, Slovak Republic
Initiation of the Post-Gradual Education on Tobacco Control and Smoking Cessation for Medical Doctors in the Slovak Republic

Konstantin Krasovsky
Alcohol and Drug Information Center (ADIC), Ukraine
Coalition "For Tobacco Free Ukraine"

Dina Yafasova
WHO European Health Communication Network, Uzbekistan
Enhance Tobacco Control. Media Prize Project/Uzbekistan

Andjelka Dzeletovic
Institute of Public Health of Serbia, Yugoslavia
For Clean Air

Saifuddin Ahmed
Work for a Better Bangladesh, Bangladesh
Strengthening BATA in Bangladesh

Tania Amir
Law and Society Trust Bangladesh (WBB), Bangladesh
Bangladesh Legal Advocacy

Kuheli Mustafa
Welfare Association for Cancer Care, Bangladesh
Addressing the Needs of Women and Children

Shoba John
Association for Consumers Action on Safety and Health, India
Tobacco Control Training and Advocacy Programs

Surendra Shastri
Action Council Against Tobacco, India
Sharad Vaidya
National Organization for Tobacco Eradication, India
Tobacco Control Advocacy Training Workshop

Gopal Acharya
Nepal Heart Foundation, Nepal
Tobacco Control Advocacy Training Workshop

Bung-on Ritthiphakdee
Action on Smoking and Health Foundation, Thailand
Local Partnership Development

Bai Yun
Jian Kang Bao (Health News), China
Promoting a Future Without Tobacco

Jiangping Sun
Institute of Child and Adolescent Health, Peking University, China
Evaluation of School-Based Projects on Tobacco Control

Avinash Sami
The National Center for Health Promotion (Fiji Health), Fiji
Train-the-Trainer on Minimal Clinical Intervention for Smoking Cessation

Rosemawati Ariffin and Zarihah Zain
Malaysia Ministry of Health Malaysia
Appraisal of the Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice of Malaysian Doctors with Regards to Tobacco

Colin Richardson
Seventh-Day Adventist Church, Health Ministries Department, Papua New Guinea
Title of project unknown

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BIBLIOGRAPHY

(Current as of date of this report; as provided by grantee organization; not verified by RWJF; items not available from RWJF.)

Articles

Houston T and Kaufman NJ. "Tobacco Control in the 21st Century: Searching for Answers in a Sea of Change." Journal of the American Medical Association, 284(6): 752–753, 2000.

Davis RM. "Moving Tobacco Beyond the 'Tipping Point.'" British Medical Journal, 321(7257): 309–310, 2000.

Reports

Summary of Participant Feedback, Global Leadership Scholars Program: Preconference Training. Atlanta, Ga.: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Office on Smoking and Health, 2000.

Promoting a Future Without Tobacco: 11th World Conference on Tobacco OR Health. Final Report. Chicago, Ill.: American Medical Association, 2001.

Evaluation Summary of the 11th World Conference on Tobacco OR Health Preconference Training. Atlanta, Ga.: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Office on Smoking and Health, 2002.

Brochures and Fact Sheets

"Promoting a Future Without Tobacco: 11th World Conference on Tobacco or Health." Conference program. The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Princeton, N.J., 2000.

"Tobacco Control Country Profiles." A compendium of information on the global tobacco control movement in over 130 countries gathered by more than 350 tobacco control advocates over a period of three years. American Cancer Society, SmithKline Beecham Consumer Healthcare, World Health Organization, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2000.

"Tobacco Fact Sheets." A concise distillation of material organized to communicate basic information about the industry, movement and the world. The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. 2000. Altogether, the fact sheets cover 16 topics:

  • Cigarette content and design
  • Economics of tobacco control: exploding the myths
  • Environmental tobacco smoke
  • Litigation against the tobacco industry
  • School and community-based education programs
  • Searching tobacco industry documents: basic information, steps and hints
  • Tobacco agriculture
  • Tobacco advertising
  • Tobacco cessation and treatment
  • Tobacco facts
  • Tobacco and international trade
  • Tobacco prices and public health
  • Tobacco and smuggling
  • Tobacco warning labels and packaging
  • WHO framework convention on tobacco control
  • Youth access policies

World Wide Web Sites

www.wctoh.org. The official Web site of the 11th WCTOH, with hot links to several sponsoring organizations and associations. It will provide archives of conference presentations until the 12th WCTOH. Chicago, Ill.: American Medical Association.

Sponsored Conferences

"11th World Conference on Tobacco OR Health: Promoting a Future Without Tobacco," August 6–11, 2000, Chicago, Ill. Attended by 5000 registrants, including health professionals, tobacco-control advocates, academicians, epidemiologists, health educators, public health officials, nongovernmental organizations, community authorities, pharmaceutical executives and the media. 500+ sessions were organized into five plenaries, 10 special sessions and 10 content-driven tracks. Over 2,500 conference attendees participated in the program presentations.

Presentations and Panels

  • Gro Harlem Brundtland., World Health Organization (Norway), "Keynote Address." Panel members: Karen Gerlach,The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation; Marlo Corrao, American Cancer Society; Samira Asma, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (India); and Gonghuan Yang, China, World Health Organization.
  • "Will Tobacco Control Save Your Economy? A Cabinet-Level Debate." Debate Chair, representing Prime Minister position: Donna E. Shalala, Secretary, Department of Health and Human Services; Health Minister position: Gro Harlem Brundtland, World Health Organization (Norway), Attorney General position: Mamphela Ramphele, South Africa, The World Bank; Finance/Trade Minister position: Chandreshaver Prasad Thakore, India, Minister of Health; Agriculture Minister position: Yoginder K. Alagh, India, Sandar Patel Institute of Economic and Social Research; Technical Advisors: Kenneth Warner, University of Michigan; Derek Yach, South Africa, World Health Organization; Prabhat Jha, Canada, World Health Organization.
  • "Model Tobacco Control and Prevention Programs Part I: Environments with Limited Financial Resources." Natasha Herrera, Venezuela; Blanche Pitt, South Africa; Mira Aghi, India.
  • "Model Tobacco Control and Prevention Programs: Environments with Modest to Significant Resources." Paul Nordgren, Norway; Heidi Rathjen, Canada; Judith Watt, United Kingdom; Regina Carlson.
  • "The Framework Convention on Tobacco Control: Negotiating the World Health Organization's First Treaty." Ruth Roemer, UCLA School of Public Health; Karen Lewis, World Health Organization Tobacco Free Initiative, USA; Chitra Subramaniam, World Health Organization Tobacco Free Initiative, India; Allyn Taylor, World Health Organization Tobacco Free Initiative; Yussuf Saloojee, National Council Against Smoking, South Africa; Judith Wilkenfeld, Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids; Emma Must, Framework Convention Alliance, Action on Smoking and Health — United Kingdom; Oronto Douglas, INFACT, Nigeria; Bung-on Rathinnpakdee, Action on Smoking and Health — Thailand; Douglas Bettcher, WHO Tobacco Free Initiative, Canada.
  • Alan Leshner, National Institute on Drug Abuse, "Nicotine and the Brain."
  • Arnold Communications, Jordan McGrath Case & Partners Euro RSCG, and Pinney Associates, "'Clean Cut' Global Product Launch," a simulation of a new product launch by a fictitious tobacco company.
  • Gregory Connolly, Massachusetts Department of Health, "The Changing Tobacco Industry and Their Products."
  • "Consult with the Experts." Natasha Herrera, Venezuela and Michael Pertschuk (Advocacy); Clive Bates, United Kingdom, Witold Zatonski, Poland, and Judith Mackway, China (Campaigning/Politics); Mike Daube, Australia (Capacity Building); Martina Potschke-Langer, Germany (Cessation); Mria Aghi, India (Children & Tobacco); Gregory Connolly (Counter-Advertising); David Simpson, United Kingdom (Doing More with Less); Rowena Jacobs, South Africa (Economics of Tobacco); Richard Peto, United Kingdom (Epidemiology); Belinda Hughes, Thailand (International Alliance Building); Dick Daynard (Litigation); Stanton Glanz, USA (Media Advocacy); Karen Slama, France (NGO Mobilization); Francis Thompson, Canada (Policy-Product Regulation); Luk Joosens, Belgium (Policy — Smuggling and Trade; David Sweanor, Canada, and Frank Chaloupka, USA (Policy — Taxation); Prakash Gupta, India (Research); Michael Tacelosky, USA (Using Tobacco Industry Documents); Margaretha Haglund, Sweden, and Salma Khan, Bangladesh (Women).
  • "Future Scenarios: The World of Tobacco in 2015." Simon Chapman, Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Sydney, Australia; Susan Pineda-Mercado, Undersecretary of Health, Philippines; Yussuf Salaoojee, National Council Against Smoking, South Africa; Judith Wilkenfeld, Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids.
  • "WHO Tobacco Free Initiative Workshop." Derek Yach, World Health Organization, The New Tobacco Free Initiative.
  • "Whistle Blowers: The Courage to Come Forward." Panel members: Clifford Douglas, USA; Paul Mele, former Research Scientist, Philip Morris; William Farone, former director of applied research, Philip Morris; Gary Huber, former director, tobacco industry-funded "Harvard Project;" Alan Lander, former Winston Model; Michael Pertschuk, presenting Victor Crawford (deceased), former Tobacco Institute lobbyist.
  • "Learning from Other World Movements while Celebrating Our Successes." David Simpson, United Kingdom (Role Play: Oh, What a Tangled Web We Weave); Atherton Martin, Minister of Agriculture, Dominica (Environmental Movement); Jody Williams, International Campaign to Ban Landmines (Landmine Movement). Tobacco control advocates panel members: Judith Mackay, China; Kuheli Mustafa, Bangladesh; Gar Mahood, Canada; Witold Zatonski, Poland; Oronto Douglas, Nigeria; Natasha Adrianza deHerrera, Venezuela.
  • "Workshop: Applying Lessons Learned from Other Movements." Tobacco-Control Resource People: Therese Gardella; Amber Thornton; Mele Smith; Yussuf Saloojee, South Africa; Elif Dagli, Turkey; Mike Daube, Australia; Clive Bates, United Kingdom; David Simpson, United Kingdom; Witold Zatonski, Poland; Kuheli Mustafa, Bangladesh; Luk Joossens, Belgium; Gar Mahood, Canada; Anna White. Other Movement Resource People: Lucinda Wykle-Rosenberg; John Kapito, Malawi; Deborah McLellan; Kathleen Conlan; Patricia Diaz-Roma, Mexico; Samuel Salinas-Alvarez, Mexico; Nicola Christofides, South Africa; Juan Almandares Bonilla, Honduras; Mary Assunta, Malaysia; Hana Sovinova, Czech Republic; Oronto Douglas, Nigeria; Pramila Patten, Mauritius; Vinnie DeMarco.
  • C. Everett Koop, Dartmouth Medical School, closing address, "A United Global Commitment for the New Millennium."

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Report prepared by: Frank W. Lopez
Reviewed by: Janet Spencer King
Reviewed by: Molly McKaughan
Program Officer: Nancy Kaufman

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