January 2003

Grant Results

SUMMARY

Tufts University School of Nutrition Science and Policy in Medford, Mass., on behalf of the Partnership to Promote Healthy Eating and Active Living, held a two-day summit on healthy eating and active living in Washington on April 25–26, 2000.

The Partnership to Promote Healthy Eating and Active Living grew out of a 1997 Tufts University conference that called for the creation of public/private partnerships to promote healthy diet and physical activity behaviors, as well as new ideas in research, education and public policy to achieve these aims.

Because physical activity and dietary behaviors are complex, encouraging healthy, active lifestyles among the U.S. population will require the combined expertise and resources of many different disciplines. The summit was considered a first step in bringing these diverse groups together to discuss the issues and develop a "roadmap" for achieving healthier lifestyles.

Six months before the summit, the partnership convened three working groups of experts from the public and private sectors and multiple disciplines. Each working group wrote a paper that was disseminated to conference invitees prior to the summit and published as part of the summit proceedings in the March 2001 Supplement to Nutrition Reviews. (See the Appendix for a list of working group members.) The working groups addressed the following questions:

  • Group 1: How and why individuals make food and physical activity choices and what are the underlying factors that affect these choices?
  • Group 2: How and why do environmental and societal factors affect food and physical activity choices?
  • Group 3: What lessons have been learned from other attempts to guide social change?

Key Results

  • Nearly 200 experts in nutrition, obesity, research, education, community and public health, cultural anthropology, social marketing, consumer and health advocacy, insurance, physical activity, public policy, psychology, communications, biological science, economics and consumer research attended the conference.
  • Surgeon General David Satcher and Secretary of Agriculture Dan Glickman provided keynote presentations. The conference also featured two panels and three working sessions for breakout groups. The effort to create a conceptual framework resulted in a systematic diagram that mapped the determinants (individual, cultural and social) of eating and activity behavior, and linked them to the diverse clusters of knowledge contained within the Partnership.
  • Among the most promising next steps recommended in the summit proceedings published as a March 2001 Supplement to Nutrition Reviews include:
    • More clearly define the "crisis" created by poor diet and sedentary lifestyles.
    • Create connectivity between research efforts, as well as intervention programs, especially at the community level.
    • Identify and train stakeholders to lead communities in affecting social change.
    • Facilitate change through policy support.
    • Identify potential data sources to support specific policy change.

Funding
The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) provided $50,000 in support for the summit from April to September 2000.

Other funders of the summit included: Kellogg Foods, Knoll Pharmaceutical Company, Kraft Foods, M&M/Mars, Novartis, Proctor & Gamble, Roche Laboratories, the American Diabetes Association, the Consumer Federation of America and the Sporting Goods Manufacturers Association.

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GRANT DETAILS & CONTACT INFORMATION

Project

Summit on Promoting Healthy Eating and Active Living: Developing a Framework for Progress

Grantee

Tufts University School of Nutrition Science and Policy (Medford,  MA)

  • Amount: $ 50,000
    Dates: April 2000 to September 2000
    ID#:  038946

Contact

David Hastings
(617) 627-2791

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APPENDICES


Appendix 1

(Current as of the time of the grant; provided by the grantee organization; not verified by RWJF.)

Working Group Members

Working Group 1

Annia Wetter, Ph.D.
School of Nutrition Science and Policy
Tufts University
Boston, Mass.

Jeanne Goldberg, Ph.D., R.D.
Center on Nutrition Communication
School of Nutrition Science and Policy
Tufts University
Boston, Mass.

Abby King, Ph.D.
Center for Research in Disease Prevention
Stanford University
Palo Alto, Calif.

Madeleine Sigman-Grant, Ph.D., R.D.
University of Nevada-Reno
Cooperative Extension
Las Vegas, Nev.

Roberta Baer, Ph.D.
Department of Anthropology
University of South Florida
Tampa, Fla.

Evelyn Crayton, Ed.D., R.D., L.D.
Auburn University
Cooperative Extension Service
Auburn, Ala.

Carol Devine, Ph.D., R.D.
Division of Nutritional Sciences Program
Cornell University
Ithaca, N.Y.

Adam Drewnowski, Ph.D.
Nutritional Sciences Program
University of Washington
Seattle, Wash.

Andrea Dunn, Ph.D.
Cooper Institute
Dallas, Texas

Guy Johnson, Ph.D.
Kellogg Company
Battle Creek, Mich.

Nico Pronk, Ph.D.
HealthPartners
Minneapolis, Minn.

Brian Saelens, Ph.D.
Department of Psychology
San Diego State University
San Diego, Calif.

Dan Snyder
Porter Novelli
Washington, D.C.

Kellie Walsh
Proctor & Gamble Company
Cincinnati, Ohio

Rex Warland, Ph.D.
Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology
The Pennsylvania State University
University Park, Pa.

Working Group 2

Sarah Booth, Ph.D.
Vitamin K Laboratory

Jean Mayer
USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging
Tufts University
Boston, Mass.

James Sallis, Ph.D., F.A.C.S.M.
Department of Psychology
San Diego State University
San Diego, Calif.

Cheryl Ritenbaugh, Ph.D., M.P.H.
Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research
Portland, Ore.

James Hill, Ph.D.
Center for Human Nutrition
University of Colorado Health Sciences Center
Denver, Colo.

Leann Birch, Ph.D.
Department of Human Development and Family Studies
Pennsylvania State University
University Park, Pa.

Lawrence Frank, Ph.D.
College of Architecture
Georgia Institute of Technology
Atlanta, Ga.

Karen Glanz, Ph.D., M.P.H.
Cancer Research Center of Hawaii
University of Hawaii
Honolulu, Hawaii

David Himmelgreen, Ph.D.
Department of Anthropology
University of South Florida
Tampa, Fla.

Michael Mudd
Corporate Affairs
Kraft Foods, Inc.
Northfield, Ill.

Barry Popkin, Ph.D.
Department of Nutrition
Carolina Population Center
University of North Carolina
Chapel Hill, N.C.

Karyl Rickard, Ph.D., R.D., C.S.P., F.A.D.A.
Nutrition and Dietetics Program
School of Allied Health Sciences
Indiana University School of Medicine
Indianapolis, Ind.

Sachiko St. Jeor, Ph.D., R.D.
Nutrition Education and Research Program
University of Nevada School of Medicine
Reno, Nev.

Nicholas Hays, M.S.
Energy Metabolism Laboratory
Jean Mayer
USDA Human Nutrition Center on Aging
Tufts University
Boston, Mass.

Working Group 3

Christina Economos, Ph.D.
Tufts University School of Nutrition Science and Policy
Boston, Mass.

Ross Brownson, Ph.D.
St. Louis University School of Public Health
St. Louis, Mo.

Michael DeAngelis, M.S., M.P.H., R.D.
Porter Novelli
Washington, D.C.

Susan Foerster, M.P.H., R.D.
California Department of Health Services
Sacramento, Calif.

Carol Foreman, Ph.D.
The Food Policy Institute
Consumer Federation of America
Washington, D.C.

Jennifer Gregson, M.P.H., C.H.E.S.
California Department of Health Services
Sacramento, Calif.

Shiriki Kumanyika, Ph.D., R.D., M.P.H.
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine
Philadelphia, Pa.

Russell Pate, Ph.D.
School of Public Health
University of South Carolina
Columbia, S.C.

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BIBLIOGRAPHY

(Current as of date of this report; as provided by grantee organization; not verified by RWJF; items not available from RWJF.)

Proceedings

Partnership to Promote Health Eating and Active Living. "Summit on Promoting Healthy Eating and Active Living: Developing a Framework for Progress." Nutrition Reviews, 59(3, Part II): 1–76, 2001.

Sponsored Conferences

Summit on Promoting Healthy Eating and Active Living: Developing a Framework for Progress, Partnership to Promote Healthy Eating and Active Living, April 25–26, 2000, Washington, D.C. Attended by 200 participants representing a range of disciplines, including nutrition, obesity, research, education, community and public health, cultural anthropology, social marketing, consumer and health advocacy, insurance, physical activity, public policy, psychology, communications, biological science, economics, and consumer research. Examples of organizations represented include major universities, government agencies, pharmaceutical companies, health maintenance organizations and food manufacturers. Two keynote presentations, two panels and three working sessions for breakout groups.

Keynote Presentations

  • David Satcher, M.D., Ph.D, assistant secretary for health and surgeon general (Washington, D.C.).
  • Dan Glickman, secretary of agriculture (Washington, D.C.).

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Report prepared by: Karin Gillespie
Reviewed by: Robert Crum
Reviewed by: Molly McKaughan
Program Officer: C. Tracy Orleans

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