January 2003

Grant Results

SUMMARY

In 2001, the National Commission on Partnerships for Children's Health held a conference of Southeastern state officials and higher education representatives on ways to form regional child-health collaborations.

The National Commission on Partnerships for Children's Health works to engage higher education in working with state and local agencies on the health and welfare of children and families.

Key Results

  • The commission's two-day conference, "Investing Intellectual Capital in Early Childhood Health" took place October 17–18, 2000, in Charlotte, N.C. The conference aimed to:
    • Demonstrate the political will to enlist higher education in helping to integrate child health services into early childhood programs.
    • Identify priority needs and promising models to help post-secondary institutions achieve this integration.
    • Initiate the development of state and regional structures and incentives to support such collaborations.
  • In response to the meeting's goals, conferees agreed to The Charlotte Principles, which outlines steps that states and universities should take in working together to improve child health (see Appendix 2). Among the principles, each state agreed to:
    • Encourage academic leaders, especially those in health-related disciplines, to visit early childhood settings.
    • Coordinate strategies across institutions, disciplines and sectors through a new strategic partnership with a concrete, measurable focus.
    • Organize the involvement of higher education as a partner in bridging early childhood health and education.
  • The project director concluded that formidable barriers exist to bringing together higher education and state governments to work on child health issues.

Funding
The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) supported this project through a grant of $49,050 to Harvard University School of Public Health.

 See Grant Detail & Contact Information
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THE PROBLEM

While colleges and universities are a potentially valuable resource in addressing the needs of children and families, they seldom exert strategic leadership in working with regional and state officials on these issues. Southeastern states have shown leadership in early childhood education, boast of excellent private and public research universities, and have child health indicators in need of improvement.

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THE CONFERENCE

The commission's two-day conference, "Investing Intellectual Capital in Early Childhood Health" took place October 17–18, 2000, in Charlotte, N.C. The conference aimed to:

  1. Demonstrate the political will to enlist higher education in helping to integrate child health services into early childhood programs.
  2. Identify priority needs and promising models to help post-secondary institutions achieve this integration.
  3. Initiate the development of state and regional structures and incentives to support such collaborations.

The conference also received funding from the BellSouth Foundation. The commission receives overall support from the Division of Adolescent and School Health at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The following eight states were represented at the conference: North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Tennessee, Kentucky, Alabama and Mississippi, with teams of 10–15 state government and higher education officials attending from each state (see Appendix 1). Most teams included at least one state commissioner of health, public health, and/or education; and several deans and department chairs of colleges and universities. Attendees also included representatives of national organizations, federal agencies, foundations, and four governors: James Hunt (D-N.C.), Don Siegelman (D-Ala.), Ronnie Musgrove (D-Miss.) and Don Sundquist (R-Tenn.).

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RESULTS

In response to the meeting's goals, conferees agreed to The Charlotte Principles, which outlines steps that states and universities should take in working together to improve child health (see Appendix 2). Among the principles, each state agreed to:

  • Encourage academic leaders, especially those in health-related disciplines, to visit early childhood settings.
  • Coordinate strategies across institutions, disciplines and sectors through a new strategic partnership with a concrete, measurable focus.
  • Organize the involvement of higher education as a partner in bridging early childhood health and education.

By the end of the conference, several states seemed poised to form linkages between universities and state and regional governments that could lead to lasting collaborations. However, in the intervening months, few efforts were sustained. Some of the governors who were most supportive left office, other states turned to new political issues and most states experienced or anticipated budget cuts affecting education. In Kentucky, South Carolina and Mississippi, however, leaders in higher education and state government continue to look for ways to work together on early child health.

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CONCLUSIONS

The project director concludes that formidable barriers exist to bringing together higher education and state governments to work on child health issues. The principal limitation in this project was the inability to strengthen the investment of the state governments in the effort. Without adequate funding or other incentives to offer, the forces to which state governments are subject make it very difficult to sustain collaboration between partners that have historically operated independently.

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GRANT DETAILS & CONTACT INFORMATION

Project

Engaging Higher Education in Regional Health Problems

Grantee

Harvard University School of Public Health (Boston,  MA)

  • Amount: $ 49,050
    Dates: May 2000 to April 2001
    ID#:  037650

Contact

Charles Deutsch, Sc.D.
(617) 432-3936
cdeutsch@hsph.harvard.edu

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APPENDICES


Appendix 1

(Current as of the time of the grant; provided by the grantee organization; not verified by RWJF.)

Attendees at ''Investing Intellectual Capital in Early Childhood Health,'' October 17-18, 2000

Alabama
Carolyn Bern
Zero to Three Coordinator
Voices for Alabama
Montgomery, Ala.

Robert Beshear, M.D.
Physicians for Children
Montgomery, Ala.

Lance Brown
Policy Analyst
Governor's Policy Office
Montgomery, Ala.

Eli Capilouto, D.M.D., M.P.H., Sc.D.
Dean
University of Alabama, Birmingham
School of Public Health
Birmingham, Ala.

Mary Finch
Alabama Medicaid Agency
Montgomery, Ala.

Sandral Hullett, M.D., M.P.H.
Executive Director
Family Health Care of Alabama
Eutaw, Ala.

Gayle Lees Sandlin
Director
Children's Health Insurance Program
Alabama Department of Public Health
Montgomery, Ala.

Arthur Nelson
President
Alabama Head Start Association
Hayneville, Ala

Gail Piggot, M.Ed.
Manager
Employers' Child Care Alliance
Opelika, Ala.

Betsy Prince, M.A.
Coordinator
Department of Rehabilitation Services
Montgomery, Ala.

Carl Rawls
Selma, Ala.

Don Siegelman, J.D.
Governor
Montgomery, Ala.

Betsy Taff, M.S.
Director
Office of School Readiness
Montgomery, Ala.

Florida
Charles Bauer, M.D.
Professor of Pediatrics, OB/GYN and Psychology
University of Miami
Miami, Fla.

Les Beitsch, M.D.
Acting Deputy Secretary
Children's Medical Services
Tallahassee, Fla.

John Curran, M.D.
University of South Florida
Tampa, Fla.

Cheryl Fountain, Ed.D.
Assistant to the Chancellor for Education Policy
Florida State University System
Executive Director
Florida Institute of Education
University of North Florida
Jacksonville, Fla.

Steve Freedman, Ph.D.
Director
Institute of Child Health Policy
University of South Florida
St. Petersburg, Fla.

Susan Gold, Ed.D.
University of Miami
School of Medicine
Department of Pediatrics
Miami, Fla.

Mimi Graham, Ph.D.
Director
Center for Prevention and Early Intervention Policy
Florida State University
Tallahasee, Fla.

Stan Graven, M.D.
University of South Florida
Tampa, Fla.

Mike Haney
Director of Prevention and Interventions
Children's Medical Services
Tallahasee, Fla.

Cynthia Harris, Ph.D.
Director and Associate Professor
Institute of Public Health
College of Pharmacy
Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University
Tallahassee, Fla.

Susan Muenchow
Executive Director
Florida Partnership for School Readiness
Tallahassee, Fla.

Doris Nabi
Bureau Chief
Instructional Support and Community Services
Tallahassee, Fla.

Annie Neasman
Director of Family Health Services
Children's Medical Services
Tallahasse, Fla.

Sharon Ross-Donaldson
Executive Assistant Director
Healthy Families
Tallahassee, Fla.

Fred Seidl, Ph.D.
Dean
Florida State University
School of Social Work
Tallahassee, Fla.

Paul Wharton, Ph.D.
Department of Pediatrics
University of Florida
Jacksonville, Fla.

Georgia
Elaine DeCostanza
Assistant Director
Planning, Research and Evaluation Division
Office of Planning and Budget
Atlanta, Ga.

Vandie Enloe
Child Care Program Coordinator
Childrens Health Care of Atlanta
Atlanta, Ga.

Joyce Essien, M.D.
Director
Center for Public Health Practice
Rollins School of Public Health
Emory University
Atlanta, Ga.

Cathy Gearring, R.N.
Coordinator
Community Health Development
Children's Health Care of Atlanta
Atlanta, Ga.

James Ledbetter, Ph.D.
Director
Georgia Health Policy Center
Atlanta, Ga.

Steve Love, M.P.A.
Deputy Director
Division of Family and Children Services
Department of Human Resources
Atlanta, Ga.

Dan McBride
Director
Education Relations
BellSouth Corportation
Suwanee, Ga.

Marsha Moore, M.P.A.
Acting Director
Office of School Readiness
Atlanta, Ga.

Celeste Osborn
Deputy Director
Office of Education Accountability
Atlanta, Ga.

Teresa Riverio
Grant Officer
Robert W. Woodruff Foundation
Atlanta, Ga.

Kentucky
James Applegate, Ph.D.
Acting Vice President for Academic Affairs
Kentucky Council on Postsecondary Education
Frankfort, Ky.

Larry Cook, M.D.
Chairman
Department of Pediatrics
University of Louisville
Louisville, Ky.

Steve Davis, M.D.
Director of Adult and Child Health
Department for Public Health
Cabinet for Health Services
Frankfort, Ky.

Donna Grigsby, M.D.
Associate Professor of Pediatrics
Director, Kentucky Medical Curriculum
Office of Academic Affairs
University of Kentucky College of Medicine
Lexington, Ky.

Rena Hallam, Ph.D.
Department of Family Studies
University of Kentucky
Lexington, Ky.

Rice Leach, M.D.
Commissioner
Department for Public Health
Cabinet for Health Services
Frankfort, Ky.

Victoria Molfese, Ph.D.
Ashland/Nystrand Professor
Department of Teaching and Learning
University of Louisville
Louisville, Ky.

Douglas Scutchfield, M.D.
Director
Center for Health Services Management and Research
Director, Kentucky School of Public Health
Lexington, Ky.

Kimberly Townley, Ph.D.
Executive Director
Office of Early Childhood Development
Frankfort, Ky.

Earl Trevor
Early Childhood Consultant
Kentucky Department of Education
Division of Extended Learning
Frankfort, Ky.

Paula Woodworth
Assistant Director
Division of Child Care
Cabinet for Families and Children
Frankfort, Ky.

Tom Young, M.D.
Director
Family Care Center
University of Kentucky
Lexington, Ky.

Mississippi
Barbara Beaulieu, M.S.
Director
Child and Parent Development Center
Instructor in Family Studies
Columbus, Miss.

Carol Burnett
Director
Office of Children and Youth
Mississippi Department of Human Services
Jackson, Miss.

Susan Buttross, M.D., F.A.A.P.
Professor of Pediatrics
Chief, Division of Child Development and Behavioral Medicine
Child Development Clinic
Jackson, Miss.

Judy Couey, M.S.
Assistant Director
Office of Instructional Development
Department of Education
Jackson, Miss.

Cathy Grace, Ph.D.
Coordinator
Early Childhood Institiute
Mississippi State University
Mississippi State, Miss.

John Hales
Director
Pearl River Valey Opportunities
Columbia, Miss.

Roy Hart
Director of First Steps
State Department of Health
Jackson, Miss.

Billy Knight
Director
Singing River Educational Association
Lucedale, Miss.

David Ronald Musgrove
Governor of Mississippi
Governor's Mansion
Jackson, Miss.

Aaron Shirley, M.D.
Chairman of Jackson Medical Mall Foundation
Director of Community Health Services
University of Mississippi Medical Center
Jackson, Miss.

Donna Simmons
Deputy Chief of Staff
Office of the Governor
Jackson, Miss.

Bettye Ward Fletcher, D.S.W.
Commissioner of Human Services
Mississippi Department of Human Services
Jackson, Miss.

Julia Washington
Childcare Director
Operation Shoestring
Jackson, Miss.

North Carolina
Donald Bailey, Ph.D.
Director
Frank Porter Graham Child Development Center
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Chapel Hill, N.C.

David Bruton, M.D.
Secretary
Department of Health and Human Services
Raleigh, N.C.

James Edgerton
Deputy Secretary
North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services
Raleigh, N.C.

Jane Foy, M.D.
Associate Professor
Department of Pediatrics
Wake Forest University School of Medicine
Winston-Salem, N.C.

Michael Frank, M.D.
Professor and Chairman of Pediatrics
Duke University School of Medicine
Durham, N.C.

Lorna Harris, Ph.D., R.N.
Dean and Professor
School of Nursing
North Carolina A& T State University
Greensboro, N.C.

Olson Huff, M.D.
Former President, N.C. Academy of Pediatrics
Graham Children's Health Center
Mission St. Joseph's Health System
Asheville, N.C.

James Hunt
Governor
Raleigh, N.C.

J. Douglas Knoop, M.D., M.H.A.
Senior Medical Director
Population Health Management
Blue Cross & Blue Shield of North Carolina
Durham, N.C.

Jonathan Kotch, M.D., M.P.H.
Professor and Associate Chair for Graduate Studies
Department of Maternal and Child Health
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Chapel Hill, N.C.

Janis Kupersmidt, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Psychology
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Chapel Hill, N.C.

Jane Norwood, Ph.D.
Professor
Appalachain State University
Vice Chair, State Board of Education
Charlotte, N.C.

Robert Perkins, M.D.
Brody School of Medicine
East Carolina University
Greenville, N.C.

Karen Ponder
Executive Director
North Carolina Partnership for Children
Raleigh, N.C.

Robin Roper
Extension Associate
Special Needs Audiences
North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service
Department of Family and Consumer Science
North Carolina State University
Raleigh, N.C.

Carolyn Snell
Coordinator of Early Childhood Education
North Carolina Community Colleges System
Raleigh, N.C.

Donald Stedman, P.h.D.
Professor Emeritius and Dean Emeritius
School of Education
Chair, Leadership Council for Health Schools
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Chapel Hill, N.C.

David Tayloe Jr., M.D.
Pediatrician
Goldsboro Pediatrics
Goldsboro, N.C.

Tom Vitaglione, M.P.H.
Senior Fellow
North Carolina Child Advocacy Institute
Raleigh, N.C.

Kristie Weisner, M.A.
Research Associate
N.C. Institute of Medicine
Woodcroft Professional Center
Durham, N.C.

South Carolina
Arlene Andrews, Ph.D.
Professor and Director
Instiute for Families in Society
University of South Carolina
Columbia, S.C.

Julia Balance, M.D.
Asst. Professor of Pediatrics
University of South Carolina School of Medicine
Columbia, S.C.

Quilla Bell, R.N., Ph.D.
Professor
Department of Nursing
South Carolina State University
Orangeburg, S.C.

Elsbeth Brown, Ph.D.
Co-Director
Center for Excellence in Early Childhood
Winthrop University
Institute for Families in Society at the University of South Carolina
Rock Hill, S.C.

Ray Greenberg, M.D., Ph.D.
President
Medical University of South Carolina
Charleston, S.C.

Catherine Haselden
Office of First Steps to School Readiness
Columbia, S.C.

Marie Lobo, Ph.D.
Associate Professor and Chairperson
Department of Health Promotion and Community Care
College of Nursing
Medical University of South Carolina
Charleston, S.C.

Harris Pastides, Ph.D., M.P.H.
Dean
School of Public Health
University of South Carolina
Columbia, S.C.

Kathleen Wilson, Ph.D.
Professor and Director
Center on Neighborhood Life and S.C. Center on Grassroots and Nonprofit Leadership
Institute on Family and Neighborhood Life
Clemson University
Clemson, S.C.

Foster Young, M.D., M.P.H.
Director
Office of Policy and Intergovernmental Affairs
Department of Health and Environmental Control
Columbia, S.C.

Tennessee
Russell Chesney, M.D.
Professor and Chair
Department of Pediatrics
Lebonheur Children's Medical Center
Memphis, Tenn.

Holly Clark
Assistant to the Govenor for Policy
Governor Sundquist's Office
Nashville, Tenn.

Greer Fox, Ph.D.
Professor
Child and Family Studies
University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Knoxville, Tenn.

Charles Glisson, M.S.W., Ph.D.
Professor and Director
Children's Mental Health Services Research Center
University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Knoxville, Tenn.

Dara Howe
State Coordinator
Family Voices of Tennessee
Nashville, Tenn.

Rebecca Isbell
Child Development Clinic
East Tennessee State University
Johnson City, Tenn.

Nancy Lawhead, M.S., M.S.W.
Special Assistant to the Mayor for Health Policy
Shelby County Government
Memphis, Tenn.

Natasha Metcalf
Commissioner
Department of Human Services
Nashville, Tenn.

Elisabeth Rukeyser
Commissioner
Department of Mental Health and Developmental Disabilities
Nashville, Tenn.

Katy Schwarz
Plough Foundation
Memphis, Tenn.

Don Sundquist
Governor
Nashville, Tenn.

Fredia Wadley
Commissioner
Department of Health
Nashville, Tenn.

Nancy Woods, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Psychology
Department of Psychology
Austin Peay State University
Clarksville, Tenn.

Federal
Diane Allensworth, Ph.D.
Chief of Program Development Services Branch
Division of Adolescent School Health
Center for Disease Control
Chamblee, Ga.

Doris Barnette
Principle Adviser to the Administrator
Health Resources and Services Administration
Rockville, Md.

Tom Carrato
Regional Health Administrator
Department of Health and Human Services
Region IV
Atlanta, Ga.

Janet Collins, Ph.D.
Deputy Directory
National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion
Centers for Disease Control
Atlanta, Ga.

Jeffrey Dunlap
Acting Director
Division of Public Health and Allied Health
Bureau of Health Professions
Rockville, Md.

Ketty Gonzalez, M.D., M.S.
Field Director
Southeast Office
Health Resources and Services Administration
Atlanta, Ga.

Frank Holleman, J.D.
Deputy Secretary of Education
U.S. Department of Education
Washington, D.C.

Cassie Lauver
Director
Division of State and Community Health
Maternal and Child Health Bureau
Rockville, Md.

Merle McPherson, M.D.
Director
Division of Services for Children with Special Health Needs
Health Resources and Services Administration
Maternal and Child Health Bureau
Rockville, Md.

Ken Prichett
Director
Division of State Programs
Administration for Children and Families
Division of Health and Human Services
Atlanta, Ga.

Ann Rosewater
Regional Director
Division of Health and Human Services
Region IV
Atlanta, Ga.

National
Robert Bartman, Ed.D.
Former Commissioner of Elementary and Secondary Education
State of Missouri
Washington, D.C.

Stephen Berman, M.D.
Professor of Pediatrics
University of Colorado School of Medicine
President-Elect, American Academy of Pediatrics
Children's Hospital
Denver, Colo.

Sue Bishop, Ph.D.
Dean
College of Nursing and Health Professions
University of North Carolina at Charlotte
Charlotte, N.C.

Charles Deutsch, Sc.D.
Director
National Committee on Partnerships for Children's Health
Instructor
Harvard School of Public Health
Boston, Mass.

Clyde Evans, Ph.D.
Vice President and Director
American Network of Health Promoting Universities
Association of Academic Health Centers
Washington, D.C.

Amy Fine, B.S.N., M.P.H.
Health Policy/Program Consultant
Washington, D.C.

Sonny Fox
Senior Vice President
Population Communications, Inc.
Burbank, Calif.

Lisa Frank
Children's Defense Fund
Washington, D.C.

Leslie Graitcer
Executive Director
Bell South Foundation
Atlanta, Ga.

Mark Greenberg, Esq.
Senior Staff Attorney
Center for Law and Social Policy
Washington, D.C.

James Haughton, M.D., M.P.H.
Medical Director for Public Health
County of Los Angeles Department of Health Services
Los Angeles, Calif.

Joan Lombardi
Child and Family Policy Specialist
Alexandria, Va.

Evelyn Moore
President
National Black Child Development Institute
Washington, D.C.

George Penick
President
Foundation for MidSouth
Jackson, Miss.

Elizabeth Pollard, Ph.D.
Child Development Specialist
Center for Child Well-Being
Task Force for Child Survival and Development
Decatur, Ga.

Julius Richmond, M.D.
John D. MacArthur Professor of Health Policy, Emeritus
Harvard School of Public Health
Boston, Mass.

Sara Rosenbaum, J.D.
Director
Center for Health Services Research and Policy
School of Public Health and Health Services
Harold and Jane Hirsch Professor of Health Law and Policy
George Washington University
Washington D.C.

Karen Scott Collins, M.D., M.P.H.
Vice President
Commonwealth Fund
New York, N.Y.

Jack Shonkoff, Ph.D.
Dean
Florence Heller School for Social Policy
Brandeis University
Waltham, Mass.

Sarah Shuptrine
Southern Institute on Children and Families
Columbia, S.C.

Elizabeth Walker, M.S.
Project Administrator
National Committee on Partnerships for Children's Health
Harvard School of Public Health
Boston, Mass.

Donald Weston, M.D.
Vice Chancellor for Health Sciences
University System of West Virginia
Charleston, W.Va.

Treeby Williamson-Brown, M.A.
Senior Policy Analyist
Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs
Washington, D.C.


Appendix 2

(Current as of the time of the grant; provided by the grantee organization; not verified by RWJF.)

The Charlotte Principles

Each state agrees to:

1. Encourage academic leaders, especially those in health-related disciplines, to visit early childhood settings. The first step is to see the realities on the ground — both the needs and the opportunities — and to meet the children, families, and early childhood educators and providers who can be agents of health promotion and disease prevention. Such visits can announce, both on campus and in the community, the institutional engagement of colleges and universities in statewide strategic partnerships on behalf of children. Creative inducements can help academics take this first step; once they do, many will find a cause and a collegiality they find attractive.

2. Coordinate strategies across institutions, disciplines, and sectors through a new strategic partnership with a concrete, measurable focus. Improving health outcomes requires state education, health, and human service systems to draw on a constantly growing knowledge base from multiple disciplines, and a closer connection between research, evaluation, policy development, practice, and public education. Partnership is only a virtue if it produces results. A relentless focus on a clear goal and measurable results is the engine that will drive effective strategic partnerships.

3. Organize the involvement of higher education as a partner in bridging early childhood health and education. In each state a mechanism is needed to perform three principal functions:

  1. To coordinate faculty and students in schools of medicine, public health, nursing, social work, and allied health, departments of early childhood education, and other relevant disciplines, working together on the same priority statewide child health issue.
  2. To improve skills and strengthen structures and programs at participating institutions to enable them to be more effective in applying knowledge to complex problems on a broader scale.
  3. To help institutions further support and develop incentives and rewards for social excellence in academia.

4. Invest this mechanism with the authority and the responsibility to coordinate post-secondary partners in a coherent child health strategy. In each state, the governor, child health, early childhood education, and higher education leaders should agree upon a state coordinator to be in charge of tracking specific outcomes and achieving measurable benchmarks. Involvement must be built across the three systems at the highest level, to demonstrate commitment and expedite work across the systems, disciplines and institutions of higher education.

5. Focus the resources of public and private institutions, and use the strengths of two-year institutions in these strategic partnerships to benefit children. Meeting the needs of our most vulnerable population requires collaboration across institutions. No sector of higher education can address the problems confronting early childhood education and health alone. While public institutions of higher education have a mandate to address important social issues, private research universities and historically black colleges and universities receive public support, share a mission for service, and have a wealth of expertise to apply to the challenge of integrating the child health and early childhood capacity and may be large-scale health providers, running everything from clinics to hospitals; two- and four-year colleges are also well prepared to provide training, ongoing support, and public education at the local level.

6. Establish within the next five months a plan of action that includes a coordinated agenda with clear benchmarks and roles for multiple institutions. States will choose different areas of the problem to address — from medical screening to providing public health consultations with multiple goals to more child care programs — and can learn from one another about what works in allocating resources, coordinating institutions, scaling up programs, and evaluating progress. Moreover, there is ample room for local variation, and the learning that comes from evaluating such variation.

7. Use new technologies to address data collection, service delivery, and training needs. To realize child health goals in the context of early childhood education settings, states and postsecondary institutions should explore the use of new technologies to plan and budget service delivery, collect data, communicate with parents and practitioners, and provide information and training for early childhood education providers across the state.

8. Leverage federal, state, and philanthropic funding. A variety of resources can be combined to support partnerships intent on improving child health through the early childhood education system. One strategy is to make proactive use of Medicaid for public health purposes. Another is to apply for the quality funds within the Child Care and Development Fund and Head Start quality and technical assistance resources. Creative use may be made of TANF to ensure that children in low-income families are safe and healthy while their parents work. There are other relevant public health and research resources, and new legislation pending that is specifically targeted to fostering health consultation and support in early childhood settings. In addition, because of the pivotal and mutually beneficial role of post-secondary institutions in these partnerships, public and private funders can strengthen scholarship and teaching in institutions of higher education by helping them mobilize resources and apply knowledge in a coordinated way to the challenge of linking the child health and early childhood education systems.

9. Strengthen and sustain both the coordinating mechanism and the child health strategies introduced in early childhood environments. Statewide partnership initiatives must become part of the regular mission and goals of state agencies and institutions of higher education with long-term planning, resource allocation, and appropriate staffing to track progress and coordinate support.

10. Adapt the new mechanisms to achieve other goals at the intersection of health and learning on a statewide scale. Once the state establishes a new partnership mechanism to coordinate strategies to achieve its initial early childhood health focus, it should be applied to advance the health/education connection by targeting other goals in the 0–5 population or among older children and adolescents.

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BIBLIOGRAPHY

(Current as of date of this report; as provided by grantee organization; not verified by RWJF; items not available from RWJF.)

Sponsored Conferences

Investing Intellectual Capital in Early Childhood Health, Harvard University School of Public Health (National Committee on Partnerships for Children's Health), October 17–18, 2000. Eight presentations and two panels.

Presentations

  • Jim Hunt, Governor of North Carolina.
  • Don Siegelman, Governor of Alabama.
  • Frank Holleman, South Carolina Deputy Secretary of Education.
  • Don Sundquist, Governor of Tennessee.
  • Jack Shonkoff, Institute of Medicine/National Research Council, "From Neurons to Neighborhoods: The Science of Early Childhood Development."
  • Sarah Shuptrine, Director, Southern Institute on Children and Families.
  • Sara Rosenbaum, Director, Institute for Health Services Research and Policy, George Washington University.
  • Ronnie Musgrove, Governor of Mississippi.

Panels

  • "Early Childhood Education and Health: Opportunities and Obligations," Joan Lombardi, Moderator; Joyce Essien, Director, Center for Public Health Practice, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University; Rice Leach, Commissioner, Department of Public Health, Kentucky; Susan Muenchow, Director, Florida Partnership for School Readiness; and Karen Ponder, Executive Director, North Carolina Partnership for Children.
  • "Postsecondary Institutions in Strategic Partnerships," Bettye Ward Fletcher, Mississippi Commissioner of Human Services, Moderator; Charles Glisson, Director, Children's Mental Health Services Research Center, University of Tennessee; Raymond Greenberg, President, Medical University of South Carolina; Sandra Hullett, Trustee, University of Alabama; and Douglas Scutchfield, Director, Kentucky School of Public Health.

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Report prepared by: Susan G. Parker
Reviewed by: Antonia Sunderland
Reviewed by: Molly McKaughan
Program Officer: Terrance Keenan

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