June 2001

Grant Results

SUMMARY

In 1998, a first-of-a-kind conference met to address cultural and ethnic diversity issues related to health care quality and access.

Three organizations organized and presented the conference:

Key Results

  • The conference, entitled Quality Health Care for Culturally Diverse Populations: Provider and Community Collaboration in a Competitive Marketplace, took place on October 1–4, 1998, in New York City.

    More than 400 health care managers and professionals, educators, students and representatives of diverse communities attended the conference, which focused on four main themes:
    • Integrating the needs of diverse communities with those of health care organizations.
    • Preparing clinicians and staff to bridge the complex issues of language and culture.
    • Designing programs and adapting health systems with community participation.
    • Responding to policy and advocacy efforts to assure access and quality for diverse populations.

Funding
The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) supported this project through a grant of $49,337 to the New York Academy of Medicine.

 See Grant Detail & Contact Information
 Back to the Table of Contents


THE PROJECT

Recent growth in ethnically and culturally diverse populations in many urban, suburban, and rural areas has broadened the relevance of diversity issues as they relate to health care quality and access. Prior to this project, there had been no forum for bringing together interested individuals and organizations to address cultural competence within the broader context of the health care system. RWJF provided partial support for staff and administrative expenses for the first national conference on the subject.

Quality Health Care for Culturally Diverse Populations: Provider and Community Collaboration in a Competitive Marketplace was held at NYAM, New York, N.Y., on October 1–4, 1998. The conference was organized and presented by NYAM, the federal Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Minority Health (which also contributed $50,000 to the conference), and Resources for Cross Cultural Health Care, a national network of individuals and organizations based in Silver Spring, Md., that offers technical assistance and information on linguistic and cultural competence in health care.

The conference focused on developing partnerships among communities, providers, payors, and policymakers to improve understanding and design of culturally effective health care systems. Presentations, discussions, and workshops were planned to center on appropriate models, policy issues, and financing of health systems, and to:

  • Identify and provide a forum to discuss the consumer, regulatory, and market forces that heighten the need to recognize the growing diversity of the US population.
  • Highlight model programs and practices that can lead to better quality services and outcomes.
  • Emphasize a systems approach based on proactive collaborations among health care organizations, workforce, and communities.

A conference planning committee representing local, state, and national government, national health care and minority organizations, a pharmaceutical firm, and diverse ethnic and cultural communities (see the Appendix) was responsible for the conference design.

Each of 16 conference sponsors — including the American Heart Association, the American Hospital Association, the Association of American Medical Colleges, and the W.K. Kellogg and Josiah Macy Jr. Foundations — contributed between $10,000 and $75,000.

Another 32 organizations signed on as conference partners and helped publicize the event; some also were exhibitors at the conference. Marketing and publicity entailed mass mailings, e-mail listserv messages, listings in various newsletters, and creation of a conference Web site.

  • Six pre-conference workshops on health and diversity issues were offered on October 1, 1998. Approximately 175 people attended the workshops, which were team-taught by experts from around the country. Workshop topics included: medical interpretation, cultural competence training and assessment, cultural competence curriculum development, and advocacy and policy development for culturally diverse populations.
  • The main conference featured 116 speakers who presented at 28 workshops and 8 plenary sessions. Over 400 participants — including health care managers and professionals, educators, students, and representatives of diverse communities — from 26 states and four countries attended the conference. Nine organizations exhibited educational and informational materials about their programs in the area of cultural competency. The conference included plenary sessions and in-depth workshops on each of four major themes:
    • Integrating the needs of diverse communities into the operational and business objectives of health care organizations.
    • Preparing clinicians and staff to bridge the complex issues of language and culture.
    • Designing programs and adapting health systems with community participation.
    • Responding to policy and advocacy efforts to assure access and quality for diverse populations.

Conference content targeted the information needs of specific audiences concerned with delivering quality health care, including: health care managers and executives; health professionals in practice and education; consumers and representatives from diverse communities; and individuals engaged in quality improvement policy, accreditation, and research. This content was organized into five concurrent tracks:

  • Health care management and organizational improvement.
  • Clinical practice and training.
  • Community concerns and expertise.
  • Policy and accreditation.
  • Research and education.

The themes and tracks worked together to create the structure of the conference. The themes represented the overarching goals of the conference while the tracks provided a consistent framework throughout.

Communications

The project staff published the conference proceedings early in 2000. They planned to distribute the proceedings to more than 1,200 people, including conference attendees, funders, and other interested parties. See the Bibliography for details on the proceedings and the conference.

 Back to the Table of Contents


AFTER THE GRANT

A committee including all sectors involved in the original conference, plus representatives from government agencies, foundations, and various communities, met in April 1999 to discuss future steps. They concluded not only that conference proceedings should be drawn up and disseminated, but that a second conference should be convened. The second conference, entitled the Second National Conference on Quality Health Care for Culturally Diverse Populations: Strategies and Actions for Providers, Communities and Health Systems, was scheduled for October 11–13, 2000, in Los Angeles, Calif. RWJF contributed $49,839 to the next conference (see Grant Results on ID# 037667).

 Back to the Table of Contents


GRANT DETAILS & CONTACT INFORMATION

Project

National Conference on Health Care for Culturally Diverse Populations

Grantee

The New York Academy of Medicine (New York,  NY)

  • Amount: $ 49,337
    Dates: January 1998 to December 1998
    ID#:  031731

Contact

Dennis P. Andrulis, Ph.D.
(718) 270-7726
dandrulis@netmail.hscbklyn.edu

 Back to the Table of Contents


APPENDICES


Appendix 1

(Current as of the time of the grant; provided by the grantee organization; not verified by RWJF.)

National Conference on Health Care for Culturally Diverse Populations Planning Committee

Sharon Barrett
Office of Minority & Women's Health, Bureau of Primary Health Care
US Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA)
Rockville, Md.

Chris Burch
National Association of Public Hospitals & Health Systems
Washington, D.C.

Karen Scott Collins
The Commonwealth Fund
New York, N.Y.

Mary Jane England
Washington Business Group on Health
Washington, D.C.

Leonard G. Epstein
Office of Minority & Women's Health, Bureau of Primary Health Care
US Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA)
Rockville, Md.

Anne Fadiman
Author
New York, N.Y.

Bookda Gheisar
Cross Cultural Health Care Program
Silver Spring, Md.

Tessie Guillermo
Asian & Pacific Islander American Health Forum
San Francisco, Calif.

Crystal Hayling
California HealthCare Foundation
Oakland, Calif.

David King
Immigration & Refugee Services of America
Washington, D.C.

Harold Lui
Asian & Pacific Islander American Health Forum
San Francisco, Calif.

Nancy Lang
Hoechst Marion Roussel
Kansas City, Mo.

Carolyn Lewis
American Hospital Association Hospital Trustees Board
Washington, D.C.

Trish MacTaggart
US Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA)
Baltimore, Md.

Imogene Manuelito
National Indian Health Board
Denver, Colo.

Elize Brown
The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
Princeton, N.J.

June E. Osborn
Josiah Macy, Jr. Foundation
New York, N.Y.

Elena Rios
US Department of Health and Human Services
Office on Women's Health

Barbara J. Sabol
W.K. Kellogg Foundation
Battle Creek, Mich.

Kat Song
National Association of Public Hospitals & Health Systems
Washington, D.C.

Phaizon R. Wood
The California Endowment
Woodland Hills, Calif.

 Back to the Table of Contents


BIBLIOGRAPHY

(Current as of date of this report; as provided by grantee organization; not verified by RWJF; items not available from RWJF.)

Books and Reports

Proceedings for the Conference on Quality Health Care for Culturally Diverse Populations: Provider and Community Collaboration in a Competitive Marketplace. New York, N.Y.: New York Academy of Medicine, 2000. More than 1,200 copies are being distributed.

Sponsored Conferences

"Quality Health Care for Culturally Diverse Populations," October 2–4, 1998, New York, N.Y. Attended by more than 400 health care managers and professionals, educators, students, and representatives of diverse communities from 26 states and four countries. One keynote presentation, one featured speaker, five plenary presentations, three plenary panels, and 28 workshops.

Keynote Presentation

  • Risa J. Lavizzo-Mourey, Director, Institute on Aging, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine (Philadelphia, Pa.), "The Impact of Health Care System Changes, Managed Care, and The Marketplace — Why Health Care Providers Should Incorporate Cultural Competence into Their Way of Doing Business."

Featured Speaker

  • Anne Fadiman, The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down: A Hmong Child, Her American Doctors, and the Collision of Two Cultures, Editor, The American Scholar. "The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down — The Challenges of Cultural Competence."

Plenary Presentations

  • "Welcome and Introduction," Jeremiah A. Barondess, President, The New York Academy of Medicine (New York, N.Y.); Rosa M. Gil, Health Policy Advisor to Major Rudolph W. Giuliani, City of New York (New York, N.Y.); Dennis P. Andrulis, Office of Urban Populations, The New York Academy of Medicine (New York, N.Y.); Julia Puebla Fortier Director, Resources for Cross Cultural Health Care (Silver Spring, Md.).
  • "Community Voices: Health Care Concerns of African Americans, American Indians, Asian/Pacific Islander Americans, and Latinos," Clayton Fong Executive Director, National Asian Pacific Center on Aging; Theda McPheron-Keel President & Chief Executive Officer, Wind Hollow Foundation; Elba Montalvo Executive Director, Committee for Hispanic Children and Families; Elijah Saunders, Associate Professor, Department of Medicine, Head, Division of Hypertension, University of Maryland Hospital and School of Medicine.
  • "Treating and Managing the Care of Diverse Patient Populations: Challenges for Training and Practice," Jordan J. Cohen, President, Association of American Medical Colleges; Glenn Flores, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics and Public Health, Foundation & Co-Director, The Pediatric Latino Clinic, Boston Medical Center (Boston, Mass.); Robert C. Like, Associate Professor and Director, Center for Healthy Families and Cultural Diversity, Department of Family Medicine, University of Medicine & Dentistry of New Jersey — Robert Wood Johnson Medical School (New Brunswick, N.J.).
  • "The Challenge of Delivering Health Care to The Most Diverse City in America: New York City," Moderator: Gerald E. Thomson, Senior Associate Dean & Lambert and Sonneborn Professor of Medicine, College of Physicians & Surgeons, Columbia University (New York, N.Y.); Jo Ivey Boufford, Dean, Wagner School of Public Service, New York University (New York, N.Y.); Francesca Gany, New York Task Force on Immigrant Health (New York, N.Y.); Susana Morales, Director, Center for Multicultural and Minority Health, Cornell Internal Medicine Association.
  • "Federal, State, and Non-Governmental Policy Initiative Affecting Diverse Populations," Michael Hash, Deputy Administrator, Health Care Financing Administration; Russell Kulp, Assistant Commissioner, Massachusetts Division of Medical Assistance.
  • "Foundation, Corporate and Government Leadership Supporting Cultural Competence Priorities and Programs," Marilyn Aguirre-Molina, Executive Vice President, The California Endowment; Nancy H. Lang, Marketing Manager, Multicultural Markets, Health Care Systems Marketing, Hoechst Marion Roussel; Barbara Sabol, Program Director, W.K. Kellogg Foundation; Captain Tuei Doong, Deputy Director, DHHS, OPHS, OS, Office of Minority Health.

Plenary Panels

  • "What Purchasers Representing a Diverse Workforce Want from Healthcare Providers," Bruce C. Vladeck, Professor of Health Policy, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Senior Vice President for Policy, Mount Sinai Medical Center (New York, N.Y.).
  • "How America is Changing: The Impact of Demographics and Cultural Diversity on Health Care," Harold L. Hodgkinson, Director, Center for Demographic Policy, Institute for Educational Leadership.
  • "How The American Heart Association is Incorporating Cultural Competence into Its Way of Doing Business," Martha Hill, Immediate Past President, American Heart Association.

 Back to the Table of Contents


Report prepared by: Marilyn Gross
Reviewed by: Robert Crum
Reviewed by: Robert Narus
Program Officer: Rosemary Gibson
Program Officer: Elize M. Brown

Most Requested