March 2007

Grant Results

SUMMARY

From 1991 to 2000 Join Together engaged in a wide range of activities designed to assist community-based groups in their efforts to reduce, prevent and improve treatment of substance abuse.

Key Results
Over the grant period, Join Together:

  • Produced four national surveys documenting community responses to substance abuse. Two key findings:
    • Communities in every state and of every size were mobilizing to fight substance abuse. More than 1,700 groups identified themselves as the leader or sponsor of a community coalition to fight substance abuse, as of 1992.
    • By 1998, 3,500 respondents felt less isolated and had better access to current information.
  • Chaired six national public policy panels to review current policy toward substance abuse prevention and treatment. Among the topics included:
    • Access to alcohol for underage drinkers.
    • Financing substance abuse services.
    • The justice system and substance abuse.
    • Substance abuse treatment and recovery.
  • Convened four national conferences to:
    • Train community groups in methods they can use to collect data and assess the specific substance abuse problems in their areas and the progress they had made.
    • Collect, analyze and disseminate the lessons learned from community efforts across the country to combat substance abuse.
  • Created an annual Join Together Fellows program, which brought together community-based leaders to train them in personal leadership development and strategic approaches to community problems.
  • Produced periodic reports associated with its surveys, policy panels and conferences, a quarterly newsletter and a monthly action kit designed to aid community groups.
  • Developed a Web site, www.jointogether.org.

Funding
The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) made eight grants totaling $19,260,364 to support this work. Join Together continues to work in this field with RWJF support. (See After the Grant.)

 See Grant Detail & Contact Information
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THE PROBLEM

As the nation's substance abuse problem intensified during the 1980s, hundreds of coalitions of concerned citizens began to form all over the country. In order to stimulate and encourage these coalitions, RWJF created a national program in 1989 called Fighting Back®.

Fighting Back originally focused on 14 communities (later reduced to eight), all of which had populations of 300,000 or less. As a result of the response to RWJF's call for proposals for the program, which 320 communities answered, in 1990 the federal Office of Substance Abuse Prevention developed a similar initiative, the Community Partnership Demonstration Grant program, which funded 251 partnerships from a total budget of $375 million.

Yet despite the work of these groups on substance abuse in their communities, those not involved in Fighting Back operated in virtual isolation, without a central source of assistance.

After meeting with the leadership of the Office of Substance Abuse Planning, RWJF staff concluded that there might be real value in developing a national technical assistance resource for these community initiatives. RWJF approached David Rosenbloom, Ph.D., a member of the Fighting Back National Advisory Committee (and now the director of the program), to research and plan such a project.

After consulting with local, state and national organizations and authorities in the field, Rosenbloom proposed a plan for a five-year technical assistance project, called Join Together, a nonprofit organization to be based at the Boston University School of Public Health.

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THE PROJECT

Under the planning grant (ID# 018312), project staff developed a detailed design, work plan, timetable and budget for a three-year program to support and monitor community-based substance abuse initiatives around the country. They also identified a set of factors that appeared to lead to failure in the community coalition movement, including:

  1. Isolation from others doing similar work.
  2. Isolation from current information about effective approaches.
  3. Weaknesses in collecting local data and translating data into strategy.
  4. Leadership burnout.
  5. Poor public policy.
  6. Stigma associated with addiction and with those who work on the issue.

Based on this analysis, RWJF provided support for Join Together to assist community-based efforts to reduce, prevent and treat substance abuse. Between 1991 and 2000, RWJF awarded seven grants to Join Together for start-up and core support, project-related conferences and outreach activities associated with cable television programs on substance abuse. RWJF also funded a confidential assessment of the project's effectiveness by an outside evaluator (ID# 035347) to be used to help RWJF make a decision about continued funding of Join Together.

The first of these grants, ID# 018713, supported development of a plan for activities to help communities address substance abuse. The plan called for:

  1. The development of a national database and classification of community substance abuse initiatives to identify the number, range and types of initiatives then in operation.
  2. On-site community technical assistance.
  3. National training seminars for coalition leaders each year.
  4. Policy forums to identify external policy barriers that constrain the ability of community initiatives to achieve their goals.
  5. A communications effort to provide critical support for all of the program elements outlined above.
  6. Establishment of a computerized information network to facilitate communication among participating communities.

Subsequent grants for core support carried over these objectives (ID#s 019307, 026942 and 027954). Other grants reflected them as well (ID#s 022578, 029585 and 030686) for conferences and outreach activities. The means to meet the objectives evolved over time through learned experience or as opportunities presented themselves. A National Advisory Committee has provided guidance (see Appendix 1).

Other Funding

With a grant from the Joyce Foundation, Join Together broadened its mission in 1996 to include the prevention of gun violence. In addition to Joyce Foundation grants ($357,000), other support came from the National Institute on Drug Abuse ($100,000), Center for Substance Abuse Prevention ($250,000), the Massachusetts Tobacco Control Program ($25,000), U.S. Department of Labor ($50,000), the MacArthur Foundation ($166,200), the Ohstrom Foundation ($5,000) and the Vignette Corporation (more than $100,000 for the donation of a software program it created for Join Together).

The Assessment

Prior to continuing funding the work of Join Together in May 2000, RWJF awarded a grant (ID# 035347) to Patricia Patrizi, an independent evaluation consultant, to conduct a confidential assessment of Join Together and its activities. The findings, shared with Join Together, are not reported here.

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RESULTS

National Surveys

  • Join Together conducted four major surveys that provided information about trends and issues facing coalitions and the political, financial and social environments in which they exist. (See the Bibliography. Some survey reports are available online.)
    • The first survey, fielded in 1992, confirmed that communities in every state and of every size were mobilizing to fight substance abuse. The survey also revealed that many key institutions, especially business, the media and religious groups, were not fully engaged with the issue. Join Together staff mailed more than 13,000 copies of the survey and received 4,234 responses by January 1993, with over 1,700 groups identifying themselves as the leader or sponsor of a community coalition to fight substance abuse.
    • The second survey — designed to help project staff track the expansion, needs and activities of coalitions and understand their life cycles — had more than 2,400 respondents identifying themselves as community coalitions fighting substance abuse. It was fielded in March 1993 and by March 1994, more than 7,000 responses had been returned.
    • The third survey identified more than 3,000 community coalitions against drug abuse nationwide. Fielded in 1995, it focused on the impact that coalitions report having in their communities.
    • The fourth survey, fielded in 1998, showed 3,500 respondents feeling less isolated and having better access to current information.
    • Join Together staff also developed and conducted a number of "fax-back" surveys, which allowed respondents to briefly relay their ideas in a form that could be collected and reported within a few weeks. They used this method to collect ideas for the White House Leadership Conference on Youth, Drug Use and Violence held in March 1996.

Technical Assistance

  • Join Together provided technical assistance through its Community Exchange Program and in response to individual requests.
    • Between 1991 and 1996, community experts in substance abuse and coalition-building offered strategic planning and advice to start-up organizations in a total of 35 "Exchanges." A technical assistance manual entitled National Substance Abuse Technical Assistance Organizations — Technical Assistance Guide summarized much of the knowledge base gathered in the Exchanges. Over time, the organization increasingly relied on the technical assistance areas of its Web site, Join Together Online.
    • Individual requests for technical assistance. Due to the time-consuming nature of technical assistance, Join Together staff decided, in 1996, to limit individual technical assistance activities to seven major cities — Baltimore, Detroit, Chicago, Cleveland, New York, San Antonio and San Francisco.

Leadership Training

  • Each year since 1991, the Join Together Fellows program, has brought together community-based leaders to train them in personal leadership development and strategic approaches to community problems. The programs included an intensive week-long training session (later reduced to three days), a subsequent meeting and follow-up contact in participants' home communities during their first year as fellows. More than 220 individuals from a broad array of vocations — including educators, physicians, law enforcement officers and local government officials — have participated in this fellowship program.

Public Policy Panels

  • Through 1998, Join Together held six public policy panels to examine key issues in the substance abuse field and make recommendations for changes in public policy and field practices. Each panel made a public presentation of its findings. Individuals on Join Together's mailing list received subsequent reports (see Appendices 2–6). Topics of the panels included:
    1. Access to alcohol for underage drinkers.
    2. Financing substance abuse services.
    3. Preventing substance abuse and violence.
    4. The justice system and substance abuse.
    5. Substance abuse prevention.
    6. Substance abuse treatment and recovery (see the Bibliography).

The reports can be found online.

Communications

  • Join Together conducted a communications and public education effort, including the publication and distribution of monthly, quarterly and periodic documents to its constituents and activities organized around a PBS television series on addiction. These included the following:
    • Strategies, a quarterly newsletter (1992–1997), with a circulation ranging from about 20,000 to 60,000 per issue. In the fall of 1998, the organization began producing Join Together, a quarterly newsletter, distributed to a mailing list of 85,000.
    • "Monthly Action Kits," which contain sample media pieces and guide readers through the process of getting publicity on substance abuse-related issues. Join Together produced approximately 40 of these kits; between 2,500 and 20,000 people received each kit.
    • Nationwide activities in conjunction with the airing of Bill Moyer's PBS series on addiction. Project staff identified leaders in 45 state capitals and recruited them to develop new state-level partnerships among substance abuse groups, public television stations and state legislators. Events took place in more than half the states around the time of the series' debut, and a year later many of the statewide partnerships were still in place.
  • Join Together created a computerized information network that facilitated communication among participating communities.
    • In May 1992, project staff established the Join Together network, which initially consisted of a computer bulletin board to facilitate the exchange of news and research findings.
    • In October 1995, Join Together Online (JTO) at www.jointogether.org started. This Web site offers:
      1. Daily news updates.
      2. Information on funding and grant opportunities.
      3. Key facts and trend data on issues related to substance abuse and gun violence.
      4. A search engine that can scan more than 20,000 archived articles.
      5. Links with Web sites maintained by related organizations.

Conferences

  • In September 1993, Join Together convened a conference focusing on methods that communities could use to collect data and assess the specific substance abuse problems in their areas and the progress they had made. The conference's dissemination product — a manual entitled How Do We Know We Are Making A Difference? — contains 20 relatively simple measures of drug and alcohol use that can be collected over time at the community level. The report is available online.
  • In 1997 and 1998, Join Together convened three conferences to collect, analyze and disseminate the lessons learned from community efforts across the country to combat substance abuse. Prior to each conference, a small number of communities were selected for preconference site visits. Investigators met with people involved with initiatives at the local level and prepared white papers highlighting the lessons to be learned from each community's experience. (See the Bibliography. Reports are available online.)
    • The first conference, "Health Care and Substance Abuse," was held in April 1997 in Washington, D.C.
    • The second conference, "Civic Problem-Solving and Substance Abuse" was convened in September 1997 in Washington, D.C.
    • The third conference, "Race Relations and Substance Abuse," was held in March 1998 in Cleveland, Ohio.

Outreach Activities

  • In 1997, Join Together worked with community coalitions to plan and execute outreach activities for a three-part HBO series on substance abuse, entitled the Faces of Addiction. Community leaders and local cable operators organized events in conjunction with the series in metropolitan areas (Atlanta; Chicago, Columbus, Ohio; Detroit; Kansas City, Mo.; San Antonio, Texas; San Diego; as well as South Florida, California and Washington state). The events included viewings of the series followed by guided discussions, resource fairs, youth speak-out events, rallies and local televised discussions. HBO also developed a companion Web site. However, since local cable companies in many locales did not make HBO available to non-subscribers on the evenings of the broadcasts, the level of viewership was less than anticipated.
  • Join Together staff worked to encourage national organizations to become more involved in substance abuse issues. These efforts include fostering an alliance with the U.S. Conference of Mayors and with U.S. governors. Join Together awards at various national organizations' conferences have recognized accomplishments and served to encourage increased participation.

Communications

Join Together distributed a broad range of publications to its mailing list, which included 85,000 individuals by 1999. These included the quarterly newsletter Strategies, which was replaced in 1998 by Join Together. The organization also produced 40 issues of a "Monthly Action Kit" geared to the needs of community coalitions. In addition, it disseminated reports on its four national surveys (more than 34,000 copies distributed in all), the six national policy panels (over 117,000 copies distributed in all) and the technical assistance manual, National Substance Abuse Technical Assistance Organizations — Technical Assistance+Guide (more than 25,000 copies distributed by August 2000). Join Together also disseminated more than 87,000 copies of four conference reports. Its Web site receives approximately 2,500 visits per day. Local newspapers provided coverage of Join Together's activities, particularly those relating to outreach.

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LESSONS LEARNED

  1. Project staff should be realistic about the resources needed to conduct hands-on technical assistance. The time, money and personnel required for technical assistance should not be underestimated. The benefits of such efforts should be balanced against the expense necessary to conduct them properly. The demands on its staff resources forced Join Together to cut back on most of its direct technical assistance services. (Project Director)
  2. In retrospect, the project director believes project staff should have been more willing to draw conclusions concerning what approaches might or might not work. The project sought to grow leadership from below rather than trying to impose it from above, believing that solutions would emerge from local data and planning. Some fellows and local groups, however, desired more guidance than the project staff provided. (Project Director)

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AFTER THE GRANT

Due to its work in the field (including as the National Program Office of the RWJF national program, Fighting Back®: Community Initiatives to Reduce Demand for Illegal Drugs and Alcohol), which has shown that there are not enough treatment slots, Join Together reevaluated its priorities. In January 2000, RWJF approved a new two-year grant (ID# 037337), which provided $6 million for Join Together to shift to a proactive focus on treatment issues. In particular, Join Together is pursuing three overarching objectives:

  1. Encourage more substance abusers to seek treatment.
  2. Enhance the availability of treatment at the community level.
  3. Improve the policy environment for substance abuse treatment.

Contingent upon the accomplishments of specific interim benchmarks, and pending a formal midcourse review of the benchmarks, RWJF authorized $9 million for three additional years of support. A consequence of this decision is that the fellows program will be discontinued.

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GRANT DETAILS & CONTACT INFORMATION

Project

Support for Join Together's National Resource Center for Community Substance Abuse Initiatives

Planning for Program to Aid Community Substance Abuse Initiatives

Community Medical Alliance (Boston,  MA)

  • Amount: $ 44,809
    Dates: April 1991 to September 1991
    ID#:  018312

National Technical Assistance Project for Substance Abuse Initiatives

Boston University School of Public Health (Boston,  MA)

  • Amount: $ 1,931,002
    Dates: September 1991 to April 1993
    ID#:  018713

  • Amount: $ 8,782,509
    Dates: March 1993 to October 1996
    ID#:  019307

  • Community Substance Abuse Indicators Conference
    Amount: $ 102,346
    Dates: August 1993 to February 1995
    ID#:  022578

  • National Resource for Community Substance Abuse Initiatives
    Amount: $ 5,499,212
    Dates: June 1996 to May 1999
    ID#:  026942

  • Community Effects of Local Substance Abuse Initiatives
    Amount: $ 383,122
    Dates: August 1996 to August 1998
    ID#:  029585

  • Coordinating Community Coalition Participation Outreach Activities Around HBO substance Abuse Specials
    Amount: $ 138,404
    Dates: December 1996 to October 1997
    ID#:  030686

  • National Resource for Community Substance Abuse Initiatives
    Amount: $ 2,378,958
    Dates: May 1999 to May 2000
    ID#:  027954

Contact

David L. Rosenbloom, Ph.D.
(617) 437-1500
david@jointogether.org

Web Site

http://www.jointogether.org

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APPENDICES


Appendix 1

(Current as of the time of the grant; provided by the grantee organization; not verified by RWJF.)

National Advisory Committee

Calvin Hill, Chairman
Great Falls, Va.

William Celester
Director
Police Department
Newark, N.J.

James Copple
Executive Director
Community Anti-Drug Coalition of America
Alexandria, Va.

Richard K. Donahue
Donahue & Donahue
Lowell, Mass.

Howard Fuller, Ph.D.
Director
The Institute for the Transformation of Learning and Addiction
Marquette University
Milwaukee, Wis.

Elaine Johnson, Ph.D.
Alcohol, Drug Abuse and Mental Health Administration
Rockville, Md.

Dr. Andy Mecca
Director
Department of Alcohol and Drug Programs
Sacramento, Calif.

Cheryl Perry, Ph.D.
Professor
University of Minnesota
Minneapolis, Minn.

Katherine P. Prescott
Mothers Against Drunk Driving
Greenville, N.C.

Sue Rusche
Executive Director
National Families in Action
Atlanta, Ga.

Anderson Spickard, M.D.
Director
Fighting Back
Nashville, Tenn.

Jose Szapocznik, Ph.D.
University of Miami School of Medicine
Miami, Fla.

J. Michael Walsh, Ph.D.
The Walsh Group
Bethesda, Md.


Appendix 2

(Current as of the time of the grant; provided by the grantee organization; not verified by RWJF.)

Join Together National Policy Panel on Underage Access to Alcohol

Hon. Joseph L. Brennan, Chairperson
Governor of Maine, 1979–1987
Washington, D.C.

Charles Austin
Chief
Columbia Police Department
Columbia, S.C.

Jane Callahan
Project Director
Fighting Back
Vallejo, Calif.

Diane Figueroa
Perth Amboy Partnership for Youth
Perth Amboy, N.J.

Milo Kirk
National President
Mothers Against Drunk Driving
Dallas, Texas

Alex Rodriquez
Chairman
Cambridge License Commission
Cambridge, Mass.

Alex Wagenaar, Ph.D.
Director, Alcohol and Epidemiology Project
Associate Professor
University of Minnesota at Minneapolis
School of Public Health
Minneapolis, Minn.


Appendix 3

(Current as of the time of the grant; provided by the grantee organization; not verified by RWJF.)

Join Together National Policy Panel on Financing Substance Abuse Services

Kathyrn Whitmore, Chairperson
Rice Institute for Policy Analysis
Rice University
Houston, Texas

James G. Haughton, M.D.
Medical Director
Martin Luther King Jr./Charles Drew Medical Center
Los Angeles, Calif.

David C. Lewis, M.D.
Director, Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies
Professor of Medicine and Community Health
Brown University
Providence, R.I.

James Nunnelly
Administrator
Samuel Rogers Health Center
Kansas City, Mo.

Sr. Jeane O'Laughlin, O.P., Ph.D.
President
Barry University
Miami Shores, Fla.

Cynthia Telles, Ph.D.
Assistant Clinical Professor
The Neuropsychiatric Institute
UCLA School of Medicine
Los Angeles, Calif.

Frances York
Program Director, South Brooklyn Neighborhood
Partnership for a Drug-Free Community
Brooklyn, N.Y.


Appendix 4

(Current as of the time of the grant; provided by the grantee organization; not verified by RWJF.)

Join Together National Policy Panel on Preventing Substance Abuse and Violence

Edward T. Foote II, Chairperson
President
University of Miami
Miami, Fla.

Lynn Beckwith Jr., Ed.D.
Superintendent
School District of University City
University City, Mo.

Abel Chavarria
Project Director, Dona Ana County
Partners for Prevention of Substance Abuse
Las Cruces, N.M.

Ralph Hingson, Sc.D.
Chair, Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences
School of Public Health
Boston University
Boston, Mass.

Jerry Oliver
Chief of Police
Pasadena, Calif.

Jeannine Peterson
Deputy Secretary for Health Promotion, Disease and Substance Abuse Prevention
Pennsylvania Department of Public Health
Harrisburg, Pa.

Charles Royer
Director, Institute of Politics
John F. Kennedy School of Government
Harvard University
Boston, Mass.

Marsha Keith Schuchard, Ph.D.
Co-founder
PRIDE
Atlanta, Ga.


Appendix 5

(Current as of the time of the grant; provided by the grantee organization; not verified by RWJF.)

Join Together National Policy Panel on the Justice System and Substance Abuse

Donald M. Fraser, Chairperson
Former Mayor, Minneapolis
Minneapolis, Minn.

Dennis Flannigan
Member
Pierce County Council
Tacoma, Wash.

A. David Mazzone
Judge
U.S. District Court for District of Massachusetts
Boston, Mass.

Claire C. McCaskill
Prosecuting Attorney
Jackson County, Missouri
Kansas City, Mo.

LeRoy O'Shield
District Commander
City of Chicago Police, 15th District
Chicago, Ill.

Sam Quintana
Chief Public Defender
Public Defender's Office
Santa Fe, N.M.

Barbara Socarras
Correctional Probation Supervisor
Department of Corrections
Hialeah, Fla.

Elizabeth Stanley-Salazar
Vice President, Director of Operations
Phoenix Houses of California
Lake View Terrace, Calif.

Michael Walker
Executive Director
Task Force on Violent Crime
Cleveland, Ohio


Appendix 6

(Current as of the time of the grant; provided by the grantee organization; not verified by RWJF.)

Join Together National Policy Panel on Substance Abuse Prevention

Kathyrn Whitmore, Chairperson
Former Mayor
Houston, Texas

Charles Austin
Chief of Police
Columbia, S.C.

Jane Callahan
Project Director
Fighting Back
Vallejo, Calif.

Ralph Hingson, Sc.D.
Chair, Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences
School of Public Health
Boston University
Boston, Mass.

A. David Mazzone
Judge
U.S. District Court for District of Massachusetts
Boston, Mass.

Steve Meisburg
Commissioner
City of Tallahassee
Tallahassee, Fla.

James Nunnelly
Administrator
Anti-Drug Program
County Prosecuter's Office
Kansas City, Mo.

LeRoy O'Shield
Chief
Chicago Housing Authority Police Department
Chicago, Ill.

Mayra Rodriquez-Howard
Director
Bureau of Substance Abuse Services
Massachusetts Department of Public Health
Boston, Mass.

Cynthia Turnure
Director
Chemical Dependency Program Division
Minnesota Department of Human Services
St. Paul, Minn.

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BIBLIOGRAPHY

(Current as of date of this report; as provided by grantee organization; not verified by RWJF; items not available from RWJF.)

Articles

Rosenbloom DL. "Tough Talk, Mean Streets." Boston Globe. February 4, 1995.

Rosenbloom DL. "U.S, Needs Gun Safety Board." Boston Globe. June 1, 1998.

Rosenbloom DL. "How Foundations Can Stop Gun Violence." Chronicle of Philanthropy. June 3, p. 42, 1999.

Reports

Ambrogi R. Fixing A Failing System: How the Criminal Justice Should Work with Communities to Reduce Substance Abuse. Boston, Mass.: Join Together, 1996. Disseminated to 22,000 community and public leaders.

Ambrogi R, Downing R and Rosenbloom DL. Take Action: Five Policies America Must Adopt to Reduce and Prevent Substance Abuse. Recommendations and Report of Join Together National Policy Panel on Substance Abuse and American Communities. Boston, Mass.: Join Together, 1996. Disseminated to 25,000 community and public leaders.

Ambrogi R, Downing R and Rosenbloom DL. Treatment for Addiction: Advancing the Common Good: Recommendations from a Join Together National Policy Panel. Boston, Mass.: Join Together, 1996. Disseminated to 25,000 community and public leaders.

Barry D, Dawkins C and Rosenbloom DL. Community Leaders Speak Out on Crime and Substance Abuse Prevention: Results of a Join Together Survey. Boston, Mass.: Join Together, 1995. Disseminated to over 5,250 community and public leaders.

Barry D, Donnay G and Falk L. 1994 Fellows Booklet. Boston, Mass.: Join Together, 1994. Disseminated to 1,200 community and public leaders.

Barry D and Falk L. 1995 National Leadership Fellows Directory. Boston, Mass.: Join Together, 1995. Disseminated to 1,500 community and public leaders.

Barry D and Falk L. Leaders in the Fight Against Substance Abuse: 1993 Join Together Fellows Directory. Boston, Mass.: Join Together, 1993. Disseminated to 1,500 community and public leaders.

Barry D and Falk L. National Fellows Program — 1992 Leaders in the Fight Against Substance Abuse. Boston, Mass.: Join Together, 1993. 1,500 copies disseminated.

Bowser B and Whittle DK. Race Relations and Substance Abuse. Boston, Mass.: Join Together, 1998. 100 copies disseminated.

Cadet T, Downing R and Leis R. Save Lives! Community Action Guide to Reducing Underage Drinking. Boston, Mass.: Join Together, 1993. Disseminated to over 20,000 community and public leaders.

Cadet T and Leis R. National Substance Abuse Technical Assistance Organizations – Technical Assistance Guide. Boston, Mass.: Join Together, 1995. Disseminated to 25,000 community and public sector leaders.

Carter C and Helmuth E. Join Together Online Start-Up Kit. Boston, Mass.: Join Together, 1994. Disseminated to 20,000.

Charton B. How Community Efforts to Reduce Substance Abuse Have Influenced Race Relations. Boston, Mass.: Join Together, 1998. Disseminated to 20,000 community and public leaders.

Curley R and Falk L. Cashing in on Funding Ideas. Boston, Mass.: Join Together, 1996. 5,000 copies disseminated.

Dawkins C, Hingson R and Rosenbloom DL. Leading from the Ground Up: The Third National Survey of the Community Movement Against Substance Abuse. Boston, Mass.: Join Together, 1996. Disseminated to 12,000 community and public leaders.

Dawkins C, Hingson R and Rosenbloom DL. Report to the Nation: Community Leaders Speak Out Against Substance Abuse. Boston, Mass.: Join Together, 1993. Disseminated to over 14,000 community and public leaders.

Dawkins C and Larson MJ. How Do We Know We Are Making A Difference: A Community Substance Abuse Indicators Handbook. Boston, Mass.: Join Together and Institute for Health Policy, Brandeis University, 1995. Reprinted and disseminated to 40,000 community groups.

Donnay G, Downing R and Evans M. Community Action Guide to Policies for Prevention Boston, Mass.: Join Together, 1994. Disseminated to 22,000 community and public leaders.

Donnay G and Falk L. 1996 Fellows Booklet. Boston, Mass.: Join Together, 1996. Disseminated to 1,500 community and public leaders.

Downing R, Hingson R and Rosenbloom DL. Health Reform for Communities: Financing Substance Abuse Services – Recommendations from a Join Together Policy Panel. Boston, Mass.: Join Together, 1993. Disseminated to over 20,000 community and public leaders.

Downing R, Klitzner M and Rosenbloom DL. Alcohol and Drug Abuse in America: Policies for Prevention. Boston, Mass.: Join Together, 1994. Disseminated to over 22,000 community and public leaders.

Hingson R, Howland J, Delaney T and Downing R. Save Lives! Report and Recommendations of the Join Together Public Policy Panel on Underage Access to Alcohol. Boston, Mass.: Join Together, 1993. Updated, 1995. Disseminated to over 28,000 community and public leaders.

Johnson M. How Community Efforts to Reduce Substance Abuse Have Affected Health Care. Boston, Mass.: Join Together, 1998. Disseminated to 12,000 community and public leaders.

Johnson M. How Efforts to Fight Substance Abuse Have Strengthened Civic Infrastructure. Boston, Mass.: Join Together, 1998. Disseminated to 15,000 community and public leaders.

Jolley T and Leis R. Community Action Guide to Save Lives! Boston, Mass.: Join Together, 1993. Disseminated to 13,000 community and public leaders.

Roberts A. School-based Substance Abuse Insurance Manual. Boston, Mass.: Join Together, 1992. Disseminated 10,000 copies.

Rosenbloom DL, Hingson R and Dawkins C. Who is Really Fighting the War on Drugs? Boston, Mass.: Join Together, 1992. Over 8000 copies disseminated.

Smith S, Rosenbloom D, Dretler A, Hingson R, Paign K and Bell N. Promising Strategies: Results of the Fourth National Survey on Community Efforts to Reduce Substance Abuse. Boston, Mass.: Join Together, 1999.

Smith SR. Civic Problem-Solving and Substance Abuse. Boston, Mass.: Join Together, 1998. 175 copies disseminated.

Smith SR. Health Care and Substance Abuse. Boston, Mass.: Join Together, 1998. 155 copies disseminated.

Brochures and Fact Sheets

Advocacy with Anonymity Pamphlet. Join Together and the National Council on Alcohol and Drug Dependence, 1998.

Press Kits and News Releases

Monthly Action Kit. Boston, Mass.: Join Together. Twelve issues per year. 20,000 copies mailed per issue by 1998.

Newsletters

Join Together. Boston, Mass.: Join Together. Four issues per year. Up to 85,000 copies mailed per issue.

Strategies. Boston, Mass.: Join Together. Four issues per year. Up to 65,000 copies mailed per issue in 1996.

Survey Instruments

Survey documenting the existence of community coalitions that fight substance abuse in the majority of American communities. Join Together, fielded 1992.

Survey to track the expansion, needs and activities of community coalitions that fight substance abuse and understand their life cycles. Join Together, fielded 1993.

Survey of the impact that community coalitions that fight substance abuse report having in their communities. Join Together, fielded 1995.

Survey of Join Together publication use by community coalitions that fight substance abuse. Join Together, fielded 1998.

Panel

"Join Together National Policy Panel on Underage Access to Alcohol," December 10, 1992, Washington, D.C.

"Join Together National Policy Panel on Substance Abuse and Health Care Reform," May 11, 1993, Washington, D.C.

"Community Substance Abuse Indicators Conference," September 20–22, 1993, Boston, Mass. Attended by approximately 100 experts in the development and use of community substance abuse indicator systems.

"Join Together National Policy Panel on Preventing Substance Abuse and Violence," June 9, 1994, San Diego, Calif.

"Join Together National Policy Panel on the Justice System and Substance Abuse," October 16, 1995, Kansas City, Mo.

Sponsored Conferences

"Health Care and Substance Abuse," April 14–15, 1997, Washington, D.C. Attended by 60 individuals representing 52 organizations. Examples of organizations represented include the Health Care Finance Administration and American Managed Behavioral Healthcare Association.

Panels

  • "Community Innovations to Increase Access to Substance Abuse Treatment," Penny Jenkins, Chris Lambert and Craig Park.
  • "Community Innovations to Increase Access to Substance Abuse Treatment," John Arrufo and Rick Colclasure.
  • "Increasing Access to Substance Abuse Treatment," Steve Allen and James Callahan.
  • "What Role Does Substance Abuse Prevention Play in Health Care?" Elizabeth Babcock and Philip Salzman.

"Civic Problem-Solving and Substance Abuse," September 29–30, 1997, Washington, D.C. Attended by 50 individuals representing 42 organizations. Examples of organizations include the Girl Scouts of the U.S.A. and Kiwanis International.

Panels

  • "Community Accountability: How Do You Know Your Community Has a Healthy Civic Infrastructure?" Jane Smith, Carol Stone and Jean Yarborough.
  • "The Complex Interplay Required in Successful Public/Private Partnerships," Lawrence Bembry, Cindy Carlson and Lloyd Smith.
  • "Creating a Healthy Infrastructure: You Can't Do It Without a Strategy of Effective Community Organizing," Pamela King and James Nunnelly.
  • "It Takes a Variety of Leadership Styles to Get the Job Done," Elizabeth Griffith, Richard Goll, David Halliday and Courtney Meredith.

"Race Relations and Substance Abuse," March 30–31, 1998, Cleveland, Ohio. Attended by 40 individuals representing 30 organizations. Examples of organizations include the Center for Community Change and the National Conference.

Panels

  • "Learning About Each Other – Intra- and Intergroup Issues," Keith Choy, Timothy Dupre, Mel Orpilla and Pelton Stewart.
  • "Race, Class and Economics," Karen Bass and Raymond Daw
  • "What Difference Does it Make Who is Creating the Momentum for Change?" Wesley James, Clinton Johnson, Rosemary Lowe and James Nunnelly.

World Wide Web Sites

www.jointogether.org provides information and resources for community organization around the country concerned with substance abuse issues. Boston, Mass. Averaged 2,500 visits per day as of January 2000.

Print Coverage

"Industry News," in Managed Behavioral Health News, April 17, 1997.

"Long Road Ahead to Integration of Primary and Behavioral Care," in Medicine and Health, April 21, 1997.

"California Hospitals Operate Program to Identify Addicts," in Substance Abuse Letter, May 19, 1997.

"Community Solutions to Drug Abuse Pay Off," in Internal Medicine News, June 1, 1997.

"Medicaid Treatment Plan Reported to Reduce Costs," in Substance Abuse Letter, June 2, 1997.

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Report prepared by: David Gray
Reviewed by: Robert Crum
Reviewed by: Richard Camer
Program Officer: Paul Jellinek (ID# 018312, 018713, 019307)
Program Officer: Eric Coleman (ID# 022578)
Program Officer: Floyd K. Morris (ID# 029585)
Program Officer: Joan Hollendonner (ID# 030686)
Program Officer: Seth L. Emont (ID# 035347)

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