June 2000

Grant Results

SUMMARY

The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) sponsored a National Conference on Drug Abuse Prevention Research.

The two-day conference took place in Washington, September 19–20, 1996.

Key Results

  • The conference was attended by 766 people from more than 500 organizations.
  • It featured:
    • Keynote addresses by by Donna E. Shalala, Secretary of Health and Human Services, and General Barry R. McCaffrey, Director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy.
    • Presentations by senior scientists highlighting the key components of effective prevention strategies.
    • Work group discussions featuring community leaders and practitioners.
  • NIDA produced a proceedings of the conference. (Available online.)

Key Recommendations
Conference participants made recommendations concerning the essential characteristics of future community-based drug abuse prevention initiatives. These included:

  • Research and implementation methods need to be refined.
  • Communications between concerned agencies, organizations, communities, and individuals should be improved.
  • Long-term funding is necessary to sustain effective programs.
  • Programs must address the particular needs of minority populations in the community, and create a multicultural approach to drug abuse prevention.
  • More linkages among concerned agencies would foster improved collaborations.
  • Parents should be involved at the policy-making level.

Funding
The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) provided a grant of $30,276 from August 1996 to January 1997 to support attendance by 28 educators, civic leaders, and law enforcement personnel who were outside NIDA's regular list of invitees.

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THE PROJECT

This grant from RWJF provided partial support for a National Conference on Drug Abuse Prevention Research sponsored by The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The conference was designed to showcase research identifying the most successful substance abuse prevention strategies and programs for youth.

RWJF's grant provided funds to Capital Consulting Corporation to identify and bring to the conference 28 participants whose primary involvement was outside typical NIH/NIDA dissemination channels. The purpose was to expose these individuals — who included PTA members, members of boards of education, law enforcement personnel, coalition representatives, and civic leaders — to the most successful science-based strategies and programs to prevent and reduce drug abuse among youth, and to encourage them to bring those strategies back to their communities for implementation. Eight of these people participated in panel and work group sessions at the conference.

The majority of the $180,000 cost of the conference was provided by NIDA. Three collaborators in the effort — the Center for Substance Abuse Prevention, the Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, and the National Prevention Network — brought 12 additional people to the conference and helped with planning and implementation.

The conference took place September 19–20, 1996, in Washington, D.C. It was attended by 766 people representing more than 500 health, education, government, philanthropic, and religious organizations that deliver or regulate services and set policy in drug abuse prevention.

The conference featured keynote addresses by Donna E. Shalala, secretary of Health and Human Services, and General Barry R. McCaffrey, director of the Office of National Drug Policy. Six senior scientists outlined the factors that protect or place youth at risk of substance abuse, identified the elements of effective prevention programs, and described programs focused on the schools, community, and family.

During work group sessions devoted to these topics, participants were afforded an open forum to interact with panel and conference presenters. Among the issues explored:

  • What are the most successful strategies that people can use to prevent drug abuse in families and neighborhoods?
  • How can people judge whether their communities deliver effective prevention strategies to their children?
  • What information do parents need to protect their children, at different ages, from risk for drug abuse?
  • What help do communities need to assess risk for drug abuse and to prevent its spread among children?

Recommendations

Conference participants made recommendations concerning the essential characteristics of future community-based drug abuse prevention initiatives. These included:

  • Research and implementation methods need to be refined.
  • Communications between concerned agencies, organizations, communities, and individuals should be improved.
  • Long-term funding is necessary to sustain effective programs.
  • Programs must address the particular needs of minority populations in the community, and create a multicultural approach to drug abuse prevention.
  • More linkages among concerned agencies would foster improved collaborations.
  • Parents should be involved at the policy-making level.

Communications

In 1997, NIDA produced a guide entitled, "Preventing Drug Abuse Among Children and Adolescents: a Research-Based Guide" (NIH Publication No. 97-4212). This guide is designed to further assist people working in substance abuse prevention in communities across the country. It provides an overview of the knowledge gleaned from NIDA's prevention research. It also provides answers from state, local, and national authorities on how these findings can be used to address local drug abuse problems. NIDA printed 450,455 copies; 244,685 are in circulation.

A record of the proceedings of the conference is available in the publication, "National Conference on Drug Abuse Prevention Research: Presentations, Papers and Recommendations" (NIH Publication No. 97-4212). The publication also includes two papers solicited after the conference. NIDA printed 7,000 copies, 2,934 are in circulation. A Research Monograph (#177), "Drug Abuse Prevention Through Family Interventions" (NIH Publication No. 97-4135), was published by NIDA in 1998. The monograph summarizes the design, progress, and outcomes of prevention intervention studies that focus on the family. All of this material is accessible on the NIH/NIDA Web site.

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GRANT DETAILS & CONTACT INFORMATION

Project

National Conference on Drug Abuse Prevention Research

Grantee

Capital Consulting Corporation (Rockville,  MD)

  • Amount: $ 30,276
    Dates: August 1996 to January 1997
    ID#:  030076

Contact

Sally Marshall
(301) 468-6001

Web Site

http://www.capconcorp.com

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APPENDICES


Appendix 1

(Current as of the time of the grant; provided by the grantee organization; not verified by RWJF.)

Participants in "National Conference on Drug Abuse Prevention Research" supported by a grant from RWJF

The eight who participated in panels and work groups are indicated by an asterisk (*).

PTA Members (including secondary school administration and higher education)
Julian Chow, Ph.D.
School of Social Work
State University of New York at Albany
Albany, N.Y.

Victoria M. Duran, MSW*
Program Director
The National PTA
Chicago, Ill.

Thomas Gleaton, Ph.D.
President
National Parents' Resource Institute (PRIDE)
Atlanta, Ga.

W. Cecil Short*
President-Elect
National Association of Secondary School Principals
Riverdale, Md.

Francis Yuen, Ph.D.
School of Social Work
Southwest Missouri State University
Springfield, Mo.

Members of Boards of Education
Guillermo Serna
President-Elect
National Caucus of Hispanic School Board Members
Commerce City, Colo.

Earl Rickman
Vice President
National Caucus of Black School Board Members
Mt. Clemens, Mich.

Coalition Representatives
Alvin Brooks
President
Ad Hoc Troost Avenue
Kansas City, Mo.

Elaine Dowdy
Project Director
Greater Columbia Fighting Back®
Columbia, S.C.

Harry Montoya*
President and Chief Executive Officer
Hands Across Cultures
Española, N.M.

Phil Salzman*
Director
Prevention and Community Service
Health and Education Services
Beverly, Mass.

Mary Ann Solberg
Coalition for Healthy Communities
Troy, Mich.

Civic Leaders
Susan D. Bridges, Ph.D.*
Psychologist
Strengthening Families Program
Bridges to Recovery, Inc.
Detroit, Mich.

Shirley Colletti
President
Operation Par, Inc.
St. Petersburg, Fla.

Thomas J. Connelly*
President
Safe Schools Institute
New York State Education Department
Newburgh, N.Y.

William F. Crimi*
Executive Director
Franklin County Prevention Institute
Columbus, Ohio

Carol N. Stone*
Executive Director
Regional Drug Initiative
Portland, Ore.

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BIBLIOGRAPHY

(Current as of date of this report; as provided by grantee organization; not verified by RWJF; items not available from RWJF.)

Books and Reports

Ashery RS, Robertson EB, and Kumpfer, KL, (eds.). Drug Abuse Prevention Through Family Interventions (monograph), NIH Publication No. 97-4212. Rockville, Md.: National Institute on Drug Abuse, 1998.

"Conference Proceedings," National Conference on Drug Abuse Prevention Research: Presentations, Papers and Recommendations, NIH Publication No. 98-4293. Rockville, Md.: National Institute on Drug Abuse, 1998. 2,934 copies requested to April 1999. These proceedings include the conference presentations (see Sponsored Conferences) and two papers solicited after the conference:

  • Eggert LL, "Reconnecting Youth: An Indicated Prevention Program."
  • Kumpfer KL, "Effectiveness of a Culturally Tailored, Family-Focused Substance Abuse Program."

Preventing Drug Abuse Among Children and Adolescents: A Research-Based Guide, NIH Publication No. 97-4212. Rockville, Md.: National Institutes of Health, National Institute on Drug Abuse, March 1997.

Sponsored Conferences

"National Conference on Drug Abuse Prevention Research: Putting Research to Work for the Community," September 19–20, 1996, Washington, D.C. Attended by 766 people from more than 500 organizations including the U.S. Justice Department, US Department of Health and Human Services, and the American Medical Association. 11 presentations were made.

Presentations

  • Donna E. Shalala, "Keynote Address."
  • General Barry R. McCaffrey, "Keynote Address."
  • Alan I. Leshner, "From the Prevention Research 'Lab' to the Community."
  • Robert Pandina, "Risk and Protective Factor Models in Adolescent Drug Use: Putting Them to Work for Prevention."
  • William B. Hansen, "Prevention Programs: What Are the Critical Factors That Spell Success?"
  • Gilbert J. Botvin, "Preventing Drug Abuse Through the Schools: Intervention Programs That Work."
  • Mary Ann Pentz, "Preventing Drug Abuse Through the Community: Multicomponent Programs Make the Difference."
  • Thomas J. Dishion, "Advances in Family-Based Interventions To Prevent Adolescent Drug Abuse."
  • Elaine M. Johnson, "The Community and Research: Working Together for Prevention."
  • Gloria Rodriguez, speaker/moderator, "Is Your Community Ready for Prevention?" Panel members: William F. Crimi, Harry Montoya, and Thomas J. Connelly.
  • James E. Copple, "How Can Prevention Research Help the Community?" Work group reporters: Robert J. Pandina, (Risk and Protective Factors); William B. Hansen, (Critical Factors for Prevention Success); Gilbert J. Botvin, (Prevention Through the Schools); Mary Ann Pentz, (Prevention Through the Community); Thomas J. Dishion, (Prevention Through the Family).

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Report prepared by: Steve Marchetti
Reviewed by: Robert Crum
Reviewed by: Richard Camer
Program Officer: Nancy J. Kaufman

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