January 2003

Grant Results

SUMMARY

During 1997 and 1998, the National Medical Association engaged African-American clinicians in training other clinicians to follow a clinical practice guideline on smoking cessation and in disseminating and implementing the guideline, Smoking Cessation, Clinical Practice Guideline, No. 18.

Published by the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research (now called the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality) in 1996, the Guideline includes a systematic and scientifically proven approach for encouraging smokers to quit.

The National Medical Association, established in 1895, represents the nation's 22,000 African-American physicians and health care professionals. This project was part of its tobacco control program.

Key Results
Under this grant, staff from the National Medical Association:

  • Trained eight African-American physicians experienced in tobacco intervention as a core group to train other clinicians in the dissemination and implementation of the Guideline.
  • Trained 30 smoking cessation specialists to help clinicians implement the Guideline.
  • Trained 125 clinicians in the implementation of the Guideline through six on-site training sessions.
  • Disseminated the Guideline and supplemental materials (fact sheets, brochures, newsletter, letters and posters) to 3,600 physicians and health care providers and approximately 1,000 community participants, smoking cessation specialists and college students.
  • Produced two training videotapes (one for clinicians and one for consumers) about the Guideline.

Funding
The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) supported this project through a grant of $52,274.

 See Grant Detail & Contact Information
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THE PROBLEM

Smoking rates among African-American adults historically have been higher than those for the general population; about 5.4 million African-American adults smoke. Tobacco use has been shown to be a significant contributor to the three leading causes of death (heart disease, cancer, and stroke) for African Americans. There is substantial evidence that physicians can help smokers quit.

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RWJF STRATEGY

This project complemented RWJF's efforts to disseminate the Guideline to clinicians (see Grant Results on ID# 029471, dissemination to organized labor; ID# 029466, dissemination to primary care physicians; and ID# 023978 and ID#s 030525, 030520, 030375, 030329, 030254, dissemination to pediatricians, obstetricians/gynecologists, female physicians, nurses, and cardiopulmonary specialists).

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RESULTS

Under this grant, the National Medical Association:

  • Trained eight African-American physicians experienced in tobacco intervention as a core group to train other clinicians in the dissemination and implementation of the Guideline.
  • Trained 30 smoking cessation specialists to help clinicians implement the Guideline.
  • Trained 125 clinicians in the implementation of the Guideline through six on-site training sessions.
  • Disseminated the Guideline and supplemental materials (fact sheets, brochures, newsletter, letters, and posters) to 3,600 physicians and health care providers and approximately 1,000 community participants, smoking cessation specialists, and college students. The National Medical Association disseminated the Guideline and materials at its 1998 annual convention and other meetings, and through its Web site (information from this project is no longer posted) and direct mail. The National Medical Association modified the materials to ensure ethnic/cultural relevance and appropriateness and posted additional information on its Web site about tobacco industry marketing, tobacco use, smoking cessation, and the health impact of smoking on African Americans.
  • Produced two training videotapes (one for clinicians and one for consumers) about the Guideline. The 15–20 minute videotapes featured smoking cessation leaders. The National Medical Association broadcast the clinician videotape at its 1998 annual convention.

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AFTER THE GRANT

The project concluded with the end of the RWJF grant. Since the grant, the Guideline has been updated through RWJF grant ID# 034068 (see the Grant Results on ID# 034068).

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GRANT DETAILS & CONTACT INFORMATION

Project

Project to Mobilize Existing Tobacco Control Support Systems in the African American Community

Grantee

The National Medical Association (NMA) (Washington,  DC)

  • Amount: $ 52,274
    Dates: October 1997 to September 1998
    ID#:  030028

Contact

Rudolph Williams
(202) 347-1895
rwilliams@nmanet.org

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BIBLIOGRAPHY

(Current as of date of this report; as provided by grantee organization; not verified by RWJF; items not available from RWJF.)

World Wide Web Sites

www.nmanet.org provides information regarding tobacco industry targeted marketing, tobacco use, and cessation and health impact information for African Americans. Washington, D.C.: the National Medical Association. Information from this project is no longer posted.

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Report prepared by: Diane O'Connell
Reviewed by: Lori De Milto
Reviewed by: Molly McKaughan
Program Officer: Karen K. Gerlach