November 2000

Grant Results

SUMMARY

From November 1996 through June 1999, the American Bar Association (ABA) developed six Unified Family Court (UFC) systems in three U.S. states and one territory and created a network of national groups to help educate the public about Unified Family Courts.

UFCs combine the functions of family and juvenile courts to provide a comprehensive approach to treating and educating young drug offenders and their families. This approach recognizes that substance abuse results from a combination of problems related to health, family structure, economics and community support. UFCs offer an effective alternative to a justice system that frequently treats substance abuse solely as a legal problem.

Key Results

  • The ABA provided technical assistance to help establish UFCs in six sites: Atlanta; San Juan, Guayama, and Aibonito, Puerto Rico; Seattle (King County); and Baltimore.
  • One other site, Cook County, Ill., moved closer to starting a UFC.
  • The ABA also established a network of national organizations to support UFCs, and it encouraged the Office of National Drug Control Policy and several other federally appointed entities to consider UFCs as an alternative tool to address substance abuse in the justice system.
  • Project results were disseminated through two major conferences, two dozen articles in legal journals, including two special issues on UFCs, and the ABA's Web site and other ABA publications.

After the Grant
The ABA continues to work with the six sites and has provided technical assistance to eight other states. It also is involved in a project funded by the Scripps-Howard Foundation to examine literacy as a way to address substance abuse in four family courts.

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) launched a national program, called Reclaiming Futures: Communities Helping Teens Overcome Drugs, Alcohol & Crime®. It is building community solutions to substance abuse and delinquency by developing the systems infrastructure necessary to deliver comprehensive care within the juvenile justice system. See the program's Web site for more information.

Funding
RWJF provided a $481,605 grant to the ABA for its work on UCF systems.

 See Grant Detail & Contact Information
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THE PROBLEM

Substance abuse is a combination of problems related to health, family structure, economics, and community support. The criminal justice system, however, frequently treats it only as a legal problem.

The ABA has recognized that many substance abuse problems are best addressed by treatment, prevention, and education, and it has sought to encourage reforms that move the justice system away from an adversarial, punitive approach to one that incorporates community solutions.

From 1992 to 1996, RWJF funded the ABA Standing Committee on Substance Abuse's Community Anti-Drug Coalition Initiative to mobilize lawyers, judges, and justice system leaders to help create new justice systems and structures to solve the substance abuse problem (see Grant Results on ID#s 019838 and 023195).

The ABA was also instrumental in persuading legal community leaders to support drug courts for juveniles, which link juvenile justice and community treatment resources to juvenile drug offenders and their legal caretakers. The ABA then helped cities nationwide set up drug courts for adult offenders, which offer defendants who have been charged with a drug offense (typically first-time, non-violent offenders) court supervised substance abuse treatment in lieu of incarceration. Drug courts can motivate drug users to enter rehabilitation programs and reestablish productive lifestyles. These courts have dramatically decreased recidivism rates and drug use among participants.

UFC's complement the work of the drug courts. UFCs combine the functions of family courts (which handle family-related legal issues) and juvenile courts (which handle cases in which minors are involved) into one entity and provide a comprehensive approach to helping families in crisis. UFCs incorporate treatment for young substance abuse offenders into the wide range of cases heard in civil court involving family matters.

According to the project director, UFCs can produce better results than other court systems by intervening earlier in a child's exposure to substance abuse, and treating and educating a defendant's entire family. The family is assigned to one judge and one social services team throughout its relationship with the court. Judges coordinate treatment for the family with mediators, social workers, court personnel, case managers, and attorneys. In addition, administrative, legal, counseling, and enforcement services are available in or near the court building.

In 1994, ABA adopted a resolution calling for the promotion and implementation of UFC systems to make the courts more responsive to family problems. By 1996, six states had established versions of UFCs statewide, and four states had some UFCs operating on the county level.

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THE PROJECT

This RWJF grant funded the ABA to develop five demonstration UFC sites in the United States and Puerto Rico. At the start of the project, sites were planned for San Juan, PR; Baltimore, Md.; Atlanta, Ga.; King County, Wash.; and Washington, D.C. Shortly after the project began, a sixth site was added in Cook County, Ill.

The goal of the project, called "Communities, Families, and the Justice System" by the ABA, was to foster reforms in the judicial system by demonstrating to the legal, judicial, and service communities that UFCs provide an effective and comprehensive approach to substance abuse and its related issues.

The project's objectives were to:

  1. Begin programs at demonstration sites where communities already have taken steps, indicating a high degree of preparation for and interest in a UFC.
  2. Educate court personnel about substance abuse and build linkages with local community groups.
  3. Create a network of national groups to help educate the public about justice system innovations such as UFCs and drug courts.
  4. Procure funding from the private sector and government for further UFC development.

The Communities, Families, and Justice System Advisory Board provided guidance, expertise, technical assistance, and direction to the project. (See the Appendix for a complete roster of board members.)

In March 1997, the ABA held a three-day symposium, entitled "Communities, Families, and the Justice System Symposium," for judges, lawyers, and administrators from each site to train them on the essential components of a UFC and to guide them in drafting an 18-month action plan. Project personnel also convened meetings and conferences at each site to orient judges and staff, provide technical assistance, and build support among judges, local attorneys, bar association leaders, social service providers, and legislators.

ABA staffers and volunteers also provided ongoing on-site and phone technical assistance to each site. The ABA evaluated the training sessions and monitored the progress of each site, and assisted in the development of evaluation techniques for determining the effectiveness of a unified approach in Seattle (King County). The ABA also conducted outreach to other states and counties about the advantages of UFCs, and worked to form a network of national groups to help educate the public about justice system innovations such as UFCs and drug courts. Other states requested ABA technical assistance and guidance on UFCs (see After the Grant).

Other Funding

The ABA solicited and obtained additional project funding from the private sector and government, including the US Department of Justice ($100,000), the ABA's Standing Committee on Substance Abuse ($90,000), CIGNA Corporation ($30,000), Monsanto ($10,000), and Ford Motor Company ($5,000). Other in-kind support was provided by the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment (CSAT) of the federal Department of Health and Human Services, the Administrative Office of the Courts in Maryland, and ABA volunteers.

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RESULTS

  • UFCs were started in six sites in three states and one territory — Atlanta, Ga.; Seattle (King County), Wash.; and Baltimore, Md.; and San Juan, Guayama, and Aibonito, P.R. One other site — the 6th Judicial Circuit Court of Cook County, Ill. — which was added to the project later, moved closer to starting a UFC.
    • Fulton County (Atlanta, Ga.) opened its UFC in July 1998, with a $1-million grant from the Georgia legislature for the first year of the three-year project. The court has hired a case manager, a social services coordinator, and a child psychologist. It will provide treatment referrals, counseling, mediation, and parent education involving substance abuse.
    • In Seattle, Wash., the King County Unified Family Court Project began operating in mid-1997. It is based in the King County Regional Justice Center, a new building designed to accommodate a functioning UFC. The court includes a staffed child-care center, a litigant-focused family law information center, and a continuing education center for judges and staff. Project evaluation conducted after the first year shows that, compared to courts that typically handle family-related cases, such as divorce court or juvenile court, parties in the King County UFC are more connected with a judge and social service providers, less alienated from the justice system process, and more likely to obey a judge's instructions.
    • In Baltimore, Md., a pilot UFC was established in September 1998. The state legislature approved $1 million for the Baltimore pilot UFC project and $4 million to create Family Divisions in four other judicial districts. For each case, judges can order social services, including substance abuse and mental health counseling, and diversion programs. The Baltimore Family Court has also developed an assessment/evaluation procedure that the project director believes provides a replicable model for evaluation at other UFC sites.
    • In Puerto Rico, the three pilot UFCs (in San Juan, Guayama, and Aibonito) began operating on March 1, 1998. One of the pilots is operating according to a one-judge/one family concept; the other two use a one-family/one social service team structure due to the multitude of cases heard in the court. All three will unify social services within the court.
    • Cook County, Ill., began development of a UFC. The ABA provided educational programs and technical assistance to the 6th Judicial Circuit Court of Cook County, Ill., which is located approximately 40 miles south of Chicago. The court has developed community relationships with the practicing bar, public schools, and a coalition of substance abuse and health care treatment providers. The local association of police chiefs works with the court to provide substance abuse prevention services to youthful offenders through a family court pre-trial services program.
    • In Washington, D.C., the ABA worked on a strategy to establish a UFC. Judicial opposition to family court reform, based chiefly on economic concerns, blocked significant progress toward the UFC model. The ABA met with the Chief Judge, the primary opponent, and worked with UFC proponents in the District. Family and Child Services, a branch of the District of Columbia's Child Protection Agency, and an ad hoc group of representatives from the judicial leadership and social service providers, have assumed the lead in efforts to explore the feasibility of a UFC approach in the District.
  • The ABA developed a network of national organizations to support UFCs. The American Judges Association, the Conference of Chief Justices, the American Medical Association, the American Psychological Association, the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges, and Join Together (a national organization created by RWJF that provides technical assistance and information to communities on issues involving substance abuse and gun violence) distributed information and/or collaborated with the ABA on UFC programs.
  • The project motivated interest in UFCs among several federal agencies. The Addiction Technology Treatment Centers, a nationwide multidisciplinary resource funded by CSAT, adopted the promotion of UFCs as an action priority for 1999–2000. The President's Office of National Drug Control Policy recognized the importance of UFCs in its most recent "National Drug Control Strategy." The ABA also discussed evaluating UFCs with the US Department of Justice's Office of Justice Programs and Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, and with the National Institute of Justice.

Communications

Project results were disseminated in two dozen articles in legal journals, including special issues devoted to UFCs in the journals Family Law Quarterly and Journal of Health Care Law & Policy. Eight articles were also published in the mass media (including The Atlanta Constitution and The New Day [Puerto Rico]).

Six issues of the ABA's newsletter Unified Family Court Chronicle were published, and one report, Unified Family Courts: A Progress Report, was distributed to 400 judges, lawyers, and justice system leaders.

A chapter of the forthcoming book, America's Children at Risk: An Update, published by the ABA, will be devoted to UFCs. The ABA sponsored two major conferences to convey the strategies and lessons learned in this project to other states.

Presentations also were made at the Children's Law Institute and the Association of Family and Conciliation Courts. Information about UFCs is posted on the ABA's Web site, which includes a discussion group on UFCs. (See the Bibliography for complete details.)

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LESSONS LEARNED

  1. Projects involving changes in the legal system around dealing with substance abuse will be most effectively advanced if a grantee institution identifies and works with judges who have the energy and commitment to push a concept such as Unified Family Courts forward. Working with bar associations is important, but with the backing of committed judges "it was virtually a guaranteed success," the project director said. To further these relationships, it is necessary to translate substance abuse research findings and terminology into language that is meaningful to judges. It is also important to build more opportunities for collaboration between treatment programs and judges into the program.

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AFTER THE GRANT

The ABA continues to provide technical assistance to the six UFC sites, providing its own funds for this work. The ABA has also provided technical assistance on establishing UFCs to Arizona, Alabama, Colorado, Louisiana, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, and Utah.

In addition, it is discussing the joint establishment of a UFC center with the University of Baltimore Law School; this center would collaborate with other national organizations to hold workshops and conferences offering technical assistance and education involving UFCs.

In February 2000, the ABA began a one-year project, funded by the Scripps-Howard Foundation, to examine literacy as a way to address substance abuse in four family courts: Baltimore, Md., Memphis, Tenn., Phoenix, Ariz., and Covington, Ky./Cincinnati, Ohio.

RWJF recently launched a national program, called Youth Intervention Networks, which is designed to develop comprehensive and coordinated systems within the juvenile justice system for the treatment of substance abusing juvenile offenders. It, therefore, did not renew funding to this project. The ABA may apply for a grant under Youth Intervention Networks.

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GRANT DETAILS & CONTACT INFORMATION

Project

Development of Unified Family Courts to Assist Families with Substance Abuse Problems

Grantee

American Bar Association Fund for Justice and Education (Washington,  DC)

  • Amount: $ 481,605
    Dates: November 1996 to June 1999
    ID#:  029319

Contact

Gloria H. Danziger
(202) 662-1784
gdanziger@staff.abanet.org

Web Site

http://www.abanet.org

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APPENDICES


Appendix 1

(Current as of the time of the grant; provided by the grantee organization; not verified by RWJF.)

Communities, Families, and Justice System Advisory Board

Jeffrey A. Kuhn (Chairperson)
New Jersey Courts Family Division
Trenton, N.J.

Barbara Babb
University of Baltimore School of Law
Baltimore, Md.

Bernardine Dohrn
Children and Family Justice Center
Northwestern University School of Law
Chicago, Ill.

Hon. Katherine S. Hayden
United States District Court Judge
Newark, N.J.

Lee Hymerling
Archer & Greiner
Haddonfield, N.J.

Hon. Howard I. Lipsey
Family Court of the State of Rhode Island
Providence, R.I.

Hon. Michael Town
Hawaii Circuit Court — First Circuit
Honolulu, Hawaii

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BIBLIOGRAPHY

(Current as of date of this report; as provided by grantee organization; not verified by RWJF; items not available from RWJF.)

Book Chapters

Kuhn J. "Unified Family Courts: An Update." In America's Children at Risk: An Update. Washington, D.C.: American Bar Association, forthcoming 2000.

Reports

American Bar Association Standing Committee on Substance Abuse & Steering Committee on the Unmet Legal Needs of Children. Unified Family Courts: A Progress Report. Washington, D.C.: American Bar Association, 1998. 400 copies disseminated.

Kuhn J, and Cribari S. A Design Concept for Family Justice in the Twenty-First Century. Washington, D.C.: American Bar Association, forthcoming 2000.

Newsletters

Unified Family Chronicle. Washington, D.C.: American Bar Association. Two issues in 1997, three issues in 1998, one issue in 1999. 800 copies mailed per issue.

Articles

"Symposium on Unified Family Courts," Special Issue, Family Law Quarterly, 32(1), Spring 1998.

  • Ross CJ. "The Failure of Fragmentation: The Promise of a System of Unified Family Courts," 3–30.
  • Babb B. "Where We Stand: An Analysis of America's Family Law Adjudicatory Systems and the Mandate to Establish Unified Family Courts," 31–66.
  • Kuhn J. "A Seven-Year Lesson on Unified Family Courts: What We Have Learned Since the 1990 National Family Court Symposium,"67–95.
  • Schepard A. "Parental Conflict Prevention Programs and Unified Family Court: A Public Health Perspective," 95–130.
  • Dunford-Jackson BL, Frederick L, Hart B, and Hofford M. "Unified Family Courts: How Will They Serve Victims of Domestic Violence?," 131–146.
  • Hardin M. "Child Protection Cases in a Unified Family Court," 147–200.
  • Hardcastle, GW. "Joint Custody: A Family Court Judge's Perspective," 201–220.
  • McMahon, Jr., MJ. "Tax Aspect of Divorce and Separation," 221–265.

"Symposium: Substance Abuse, Families and the Courts: Legal and Public Health Challenges" Special Issue: Journal of Health Care Law & Policy, 3 (1999).

  • Murphy SM. "Unified Family Courts: A Mandate from Heaven," vii–x.
  • Babb BA and Moran JD. "Substance Abuse, Families, and Unified Family Courts: The Creation of a Caring Justice System," 1–43.
  • Foster SE and Macchetto ML. "Providing Safe Haven: The Challenge to Family Courts in Cases of Child Abuse and Neglect by Substance-Abusing Parents," 44–71.
  • Roberts D. "The Challenge of Substance Abuse for Family Preservation Policy," 72–87.
  • Murphy JC and Potthast. "Domestic Violence, Substance Abuse, and Child Welfare: The Legal System's Response," 88–126.
  • Hutchins MB. "Substance Abuse and an Urban Court's Family Division: A View from Baltimore City," 127–134.
  • Boldt, RC. "Evaluating Histories of Substance Abuse in Cases Involving the Termination of Parental Rights," 135–150.
  • Millstein RA and Leshner AI. "The Science of Addiction: Research and Public Health Perspectives," 151–165.
  • Danziger G and Kuhn JA. "Drug Treatment Courts: Evolution, Evaluation, and Future Directions," 166–190.
  • Parrish M. "Substance Abuse, Families, and the Courts," 191–206.

Journals

Babb B. "Fashioning an Interdisciplinary Framework for Court Reform in Family Law: A Blueprint to Construct a Unified Family Court." Southern California Law Review, 71(469): 469–545, 1998.

Babb B. "Where We Stand: An Analysis of America's Family Law Adjudicatory Systems and the Mandate to Establish Unified Family Courts." Family Law Quarterly, 32(31): 1998.

Cribari S. "Unified Family Courts: Therapeutic Power and Judicial Authority." Voir Dire, 3(2): 7–9, 1998.

Danziger G and Kuhn JA. "Drug Treatment Courts and Unified Family Courts: Evolution, Evaluation, and Future Directions." Journal of Health Care Law and Policy, 3(1): 1999. Abstract available online.

Kuhn J. "A Seven-Year Lesson on Unified Family Courts: What We Have Learned Since the 1990 National Family Court Symposium," Family Law Quarterly, 32(469): 1998.

Shea T. "Utah Family Court: An Idea Whose Time Has Come." Voir Dire, 3(2): 9–10, 1998.

Sponsored Conferences

"Communities, Families, and the Justice System Symposium," March 9–11, 1997, Princeton, N.J. Attended by 30 representatives of the 6 project sites.

Presentations

  • Jeffrey Kuhn, "Overview of Unified Family Courts."
  • Hon. Robert Fall, "The Role of the Judge in a Unified Family Court."
  • Jeffrey Kuhn, "Family Court Services, Case Management, and Delivery of Services."
  • Lee Hymerling, "The Roles of the State/Local Bar Associations and Family Law Practitioners in Developing and Maintaining a Family Court."
  • Hon. Katherine Hayden, "The Relationship of the Drug Court to the Unified Family Court."
  • Dianne Robinson, "The Role of the Community and Citizen Volunteers."
  • Gordon Zimmerman, "Development of a Unified Family Court Plan."

Meeting, June 6, 1997, Baltimore, Md. Attended by 25–30 court administrative staff and Baltimore County family court judges.

Presentations

  • Jeffrey Kuhn, "Overview of Unified Family Courts."
  • Jeffrey Kuhn, "Family Court Services, Case Management, and Delivery of Services."

"The Roles of the State/Local Bar Association, and Family Law Practitioners in Developing and Maintaining a Family Court," Lee Hymerling, Baltimore, Md., June 9, 1997. Attended by approximately 30 Baltimore City Bar Association leaders and members.

"Unified Family Court for Fulton County," June 27, 1997, Atlanta, Ga. Attended by 100 community leaders, judges, legislators, lawyers, and social service providers in Fulton County.

Presentations

  • Jeffrey Kuhn, "Overview of Unified Family Courts."
  • Hon. Howard Lipsey, "Helping People Help Themselves."
  • Hon. Thelma Wyatt Cummings Moore, "Welcoming Remarks and Call to Action."
  • Stephen Cribari, "The ABA's Role in Developing and Implementing Unified Family Courts."
  • Various members of the community, "Fulton County Family Court Pilot Project Team Reports."

"Unified Family Courts," July 17, 1997, Chicago, Ill. Attended by 100 judges, lawyers, social service providers, case managers, and community activists in the 6th Circuit.

Presentations

  • Jeffrey Kuhn, "Overview of Unified Family Courts."
  • Hon. Michael Town, "The Role of the Judge: Working with Court Personnel, Families and the Community."
  • Barbara Babb, "The Roles of Bar Associations, Community Organizations, and Family Law Practitioners in Developing and Maintaining a Family Court."

"Foro Especiale de Asuntos de Familia y Menores" (Special Summit on Unified Family Courts), September 25–26, 1997, San Juan, Puerto Rico. Attended by 150 judges, lawyers, social service providers, community leaders, and administrators from Puerto Rico.

Presentations

  • Pedro Pierluisi, "Opening Remarks."
  • Jeffrey Kuhn, "Overview of Unified Family Courts: Goals and Operation."
  • Hon. Michael Town, "The Family Court in Action: A Judge in a Family Court."
  • Stephen J. Cribari, "Secrecy, Confidentiality, and the Problem of Recusal in Juvenile and Family Courts."
  • Sandra Manzo, "How to Coordinate Social Services and the Court."
  • Barbara Babb, "The Role of the Bar Association."

"Unified Family Courts: A Symposium on Substance Abuse Issues Affecting the Family and the Community," March 27–28, 1998, Landsdowne, Va. Attended by 40 judges, lawyers, social service providers, and administration from the 6 project sites.

Presentations

  • Carlton Erickson, "The Science of Addiction."
  • Elizabeth Fulton Howell, "Physical Signs and Symptoms of Substance Use Disorders in Individuals and Families."
  • Beverly Coleman, "Alcohol, Drugs, Violence: The Vicious Cycle."
  • Patricia Fazzone, "Making It Work: Creating Community Linkages."
  • Gary B. Randall, and Patricia Stilen, "Screening, Assessment and Referral."
  • Gloria Danziger, "The Role of the American Bar Association in Developing and Implementing Substance Abuse Program in Unified Family Courts."

"Family Courts: Judicial Training," a statewide seminar on judicial training for family courts, Baltimore, Md., May 11, 1998. Attended by judges from the 6 largest circuit courts in Maryland who had been mandated to develop a family court plan.

Presentations

  • Jeffrey Kuhn, "Integrated Case Management in a Family Court Setting."
  • Hon. Katherine Hayden, "Unified Family Courts and Drug Courts."
  • Barbara Babb, "Theory and Philosophy of Unified Family Courts"

"The American Bar Association Summit on Unified Family Courts: Exploring Solutions for Families, Women and Children in Crisis," May 14–16, 1998, Philadelphia, Pa. Attended by 200 individuals from 30 states representing teams of judges, lawyers, social service providers, and administrators.

Presentations

  • James L. Forman and John McKay, "Closing Plenary Session."

Sessions

  • "Unified Family Courts: Exploring Solutions for Families, Women, and Children in Crisis," Catherine J. Ross, Co-Chair, ABA Steering Committee on the Unmet Legal Needs of children and Associate Professor, George Washington University Law School (Washington, D.C.); Jerome J. Shestack (moderator), President and Partner, Wolf Block Schorr Solis-Cohen (Philadelphia, Pa.); Barbara J. Hart, Legal Director, Pennsylvania Coalition Against Domestic Violence (Harrisburg, Pa.); Hon. Katherine S. Hayden, U.S. District Court Judge, District of New Jersey (Newark, N.J.): Jeffrey Kuhn, Assistant Director, Family Division, Administrative Office of the Courts (Trenton, N.J.); and Hon. Alastair Nicholson, Chief Judge, Family Court or Australia and President, Association of Family and Conciliation Courts (Melbourne, Victoria, Australia).
  • "Unified Family Courts: A Day in the Life," R. William Ide, Chair, ABA Standing Committee on Substance Abuse, former ABA President and Senior Vice President, General Counsel and Secretary, Monsanto Company (St. Louis, Mo.); Noel Brennen (moderator), Deputy Assistant Attorney General, Office of Justice Programs, US Department of Justice (Washington, D.C.); Elizabeth Bennett (Philadelphia, Pa.); Jean Biesecker (Philadelphia, Pa.) Frank Cervone, Co-Chair, ABA Section of Litigation Task Force on Children and Executive Director, Support Center for Child Advocates (Philadelphia, Pa.); Judge Nicholas Cipriani, Former Administrative Judge, Family Court of Philadelphia (Philadelphia, Pa.); Robert Hacker, Executive Director, Women in Transition (Philadelphia, Pa.); Lee M. Hymerling, Partner, Archer & Greiner PC (Haddonfield, N.J.); Vivian Alford Kaeppel, Staff Attorney, Women Against Abuse Legal Center (Philadelphia, Pa.); Mimi Rose, Chief Family Violence and Sexual Assault Unit, District Attorney's Office of Philadelphia (Philadelphia, Pa.); and Laval Wilson (role players) Staff Attorney, Juvenile Law Center (Philadelphia, Pa.); Hon. Cindy S. Lederman, Judge, Florida Circuit Court, 11th Judicial Circuit, and Hon. Vincent J. Poppiti Chief Judge, Delaware Family Court (Wilmington, Del.) (commentators).
  • "The Relationship Between Very Early Childhood Development and the Onset of Later Problems in a Child's Life," T. Berry Brazelton, M.D. (Cambridge, Mass.).
  • "Unified Family Courts: What Works," Catherine J. Ross (moderator), Mercedes Bauermeister and Hon. Thelma Wyatt Cummings Moore.

Concurrent Workshops:

  • "Early Stages: How Do We Get Started?," Gina Wood (facilitator) Director, Concentration of Federal Efforts Program, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, US Department of Justice (Washington, D.C.); Gene Flango, Vice President, Research Division, National Center for State Courts (Williamsburg, Va.); and Jeffrey Kuhn, Assistant Director, Family Division, Administrative Office of the Courts.
  • "Services and Accountability," Doris M. Clanton (facilitator), Director, Legal Risk Management unit, Georgia Department of Human Resources, Division of Mental Health, Mental Retardation and Substance Abuse (Atlanta, Ga.); Hon. Leonard Edwards, Judge, Santa Clara County Superior Court (San Jose, Calif.); Michele Guhl, Deputy Commissioner, Division of youth and Family Services (Trenton, N.J.); David Heden, Chief, Rhode Island Family Court, Juvenile Intake Office (Providence, R.I.); and Robert Tompkins, Deputy Director of Family Services, Family Division, Connecticut Superior Court (Esterfield, Conn.).
  • "Identifying and Overcoming Barriers: Getting Started," Barbara A. Babb (facilitator), Assistant Professor of Law, university of Baltimore School of Law (Baltimore, Md.); Mercedes Bauermesiter, Court Administrator, General Court of Justice (Hato Rey, P.R.); Hon. Stephen B. Herrell, Judge, Multnomah County Court and President, National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges (Portland, Ore.); Hon. Thelma Wyatt Cummings Moore, Judge, Superior Court of Fulton County (Atlanta, Ga.); and Robert J. Spagnoletti, US Assistant Attorney, Chief, Domestic Violence Section, US Department of Justice (Washington, D.C.).
  • "Management Information Systems/Technology," Wendy Patton (facilitator), Counsel, Office of Policy Development, US Department of Justice (Washington, D.C.); Mark Hardin, Project Director, ABA YLD Center on Children and the Law (Washington, D.C.); Lisa Mollica, Project Manager, Administrative Office of the Court (Trenton, N.J.); and Chris Stone, President and director, Vera Institute of Justice (New York, N.Y.).
  • "Structural Choices," Hon. Clinton E. Deveaux (facilitator), Judge, Atlanta Municipal Court (Atlanta, Ga.); Hon. Richard FitzGerald, Judge, Jefferson Family Court (Louisville, Ky.); Hon. Albert J. Matricciani, Jr., Associate Judge, Circuit Court for Baltimore City (Baltimore, Md.); and Joan Meier, Professor of Clinical Law and Director of the Domestic Violence Clinical Advocacy Project, George Washington University Law School (Washington, D.C.).
  • "Safety and Accountability: Effectively Addressing Violence," Catherine Pierce (facilitator), Deputy Administrator, Violence Against Women Grants Office, Office of Justice Programs, US Department of Justice (Washington, D.C.); David Adams, Program Director, Emerge (Cambridge, Mass.); Barbara Hart, Legal Director, Pennsylvania Coalition Against Domestic Violence (Harrisburg, Pa.); and Hon. Michael A. Town, Circuit Court Judge, Hawaii First Circuit Court (Honolulu, Hawaii).
  • "Serving the Family, Serving the Court: Court Based Pro Bono Projects," Hon. Judith M. Billings (facilitator), Chair, ABA Standing Committee on Pro Bono and Public Service and Judge, Utah Court of Appeals (Salt Lake City, Utah); Frank Cervone, Co-Chair, ABA Section of Litigation Task Force on Children and Executive Director, Support Center for child Advocates (Philadelphia, Pa.); Lee M. Hymerling, Partner, Archer & Greiner PC (Haddonfield, N.J.); and Christopher L. Griffin, Shareholder, Annis Mitchell Cockey Edwards & Roehn, Pa. (Tampa, Fla.).
  • "Early Stages: How Do We Get Started?," A. P. Carlton, Jr. (facilitator), Chair, ABA House of Delegates, ABA Board of Governors and Partner, Sanford Holshauser Law Firm (Raleigh, N.C.); Janet Fink, Deputy Counsel, New York Unified Court System (New York, N.Y.); Hon. Sheila Murphy, Presiding Judge, Circuit Court of Cook County, Sixth Municipal District (Cook County, Ill.); and Debbie Segal, Executive Director, Atlanta Volunteer Lawyers Foundation (Atlanta, Ga.).
  • "Once Authorized: How Do We Develop It From Here?" Mariel Morlsey (facilitator), Chair, ABA Section of Individual Rights and Responsibilities and Professor, Temple University Law School (Philadelphia, Pa.); Hon. Robert J. Anderson, Judge, DuPage County Circuit Court (Wheaton, Ill.); Barbara A. Babb, Assistant Professor of Law, University of Baltimore School of Law (Baltimore, Md.); and Hon. Marsha J. Pechman, Judge, King County Court Regional Justice Center (Kent, Wash.).
  • "Established: Staying on the Cutting Edge?" Hon. Howard I. Lipsey (facilitator), Associate Judge, Family Court of the State of Rhode Island (Warwick, R.I.) Hon. Richard FitzGerald, Judge, Jefferson Family Court (Louisville, Ky.); Jeffrey Kuhn, Assistant Director, Family Division, Administrative Office of the Courts (Trenton, N.J.); and Hon. Robert Page, Presiding Judge, Family Part, Camden County Hall of Justice (Camden, N.J.).

"Substance Abuse, Families and the Courts: Legal and Public Health Challenges," May 14, 1999, Baltimore, Md. Attended by 150 judges, lawyers, social workers, treatment providers, psychologists, and others associated with family courts in the state of Maryland.

Presentations

  • Georges C. Benjamin, M.D., Secretary, Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, "Increasing the Availability of Substance Abuse Programs: The Maryland Initiative."
  • Richard A. Millstein, Deputy Director, National Institute on Drug Abuse, "The Science of Addiction: Research and Public Health Perspectives."
  • Hon. Sheila Murphy, Presiding Judge, 6th district, Circuit court of Cook County, Illinois, "The Impact of Substance Abuse on Individuals and Families: A Personal Experience."

Panels

  • "The Impact of Addiction on Families," Anthony C. Tommasello, University of Maryland School of Pharmacy; Susan E. Foster, The National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University; Margarete I. Parrish, University of Maryland School of Social Work; and Miriam B. Hutchins, Domestic Equity Master, Circuit Court for Baltimore City.
  • "Therapeutic Jurisprudence and Unified Family Courts," Barbara A. Babb, University of Baltimore School of Law; Hon. Albert J. Matricciani, Jr., Judge-in-Charge, Family Division/Domestic Docket, Circuit Court for Baltimore City; and Judith D. Moran, Former Family Division Coordinator, Circuit Court for Baltimore City.
  • "Family Drug Treatment Courts: Evolution, Evaluation, and Future Directions," Hon. Martin P. Welch, Sr., Judge-in-Charge, Family Division/Juvenile Docket, Circuit Court for Baltimore City; Raye A. Barbieri, Project Director, Family court Treatment Court, New York County Family Court; Gloria H. Danziger, Staff Director, American Bar Association Standing Committee on Substance Abuse; and Jeffrey A. Kuhn, Chief Consultant on Unified Family Courts, American Bar Association.
  • "Substance Abuse, Child Welfare and Family Preservation: Critical Perspectives," Dorothy E. Roberts, Northwestern University School of Law, Richard Boldt; University of Maryland School of Law; and Jane C. Murphy, University of Baltimore School of Law.

"Unified Family Court Leadership Symposium," July 23–24, 1999, Washington, D.C. Attended by 50 people from 11 states representing teams of judges, lawyers, social service providers, and administrators.

Presentations

  • Hon. Robert A. Fall, Judge, Superior Court, Appellate Division (Red Bank, N.J.), "UFC Leadership Planning."
  • Hon. Thelma Wyatt Cummings Moore, Chief Judge, Fulton County Superior Court (Atlanta, Ga.), "UFC Community Outreach Planning."
  • Hon. Richard FitzGerald, Chief Judge, Family Court (Louisville, Ky.), "UFC Values Identification."
  • Hon. Michael A. Town, Judge, Circuit Court (Honolulu, Hawaii), "Planning for Practice of Therapeutic and Preventative Justice."
  • Hon. Sheila Murphy, Presiding Judge, Cook County circuit Court (Markham, Ill.), and Hon. John Connolly, Presiding Judge, Ramsey County Juvenile Court (St. Paul, Minn.), "Planning to Overcome Resource Limitations in UFCs."
  • Jeffrey A. Kuhn, Chief Consultant on Unified Family Courts, American Bar Association (Washington, D.C.), "Planning for UFC Performance Measurement."
  • Risa Gueron, Executive Director, Children of Separation & Divorce Inc. (Columbia, Md.), "Family Resiliency Model."
  • Hon. Joan Byer, Family Court (Louisville, Ky.), "Truancy Prevention Project."

Panels:

  • "Team Breakout: Development of State-Specific Strategic Plans," Chris Griffin, Chair, Unified Family Court Committee, ABA Standing Committee on Substance Abuse, Stephen Cribari, and Judith Moran (facilitators).
  • "Discussion: Innovative Ideas Within the Strategic Plans," Chris Griffin, Chair, Unified Family Court Committee, ABA Standing Committee on Substance Abuse; Stephen Cribari, Judith Moran, Hon. Robert A. Fall, Judge, Superior Court, Appellate Division (Red Bank, N.J.); Hon. Thelma Wyatt Cummings Moore, Chief Judge, Fulton County Superior Court (Atlanta, Ga.); Hon. Richard FitzGerald, Chief Judge, Family Court (Louisville, Ky.); Hon. Michael A. Town, Judge, Circuit Court (Honolulu, Hawaii); Hon. Sheila Murphy, Presiding Judge, Cook County circuit Court (Markham, Ill.); Hon. John Connolly, Presiding Judge, Ramsey County Juvenile Court (St. Paul, Minn.); and Jeffrey A. Kuhn, Chief Consultant on Unified Family Courts, American Bar Association (Washington, D.C.).

Presentations and Testimony

Curtis Barrett, Donald Bersoff, Sheila Murphy, and Eric Drogin, "Addictions and Family Law," at the American Bar Association Annual Meeting, August 1997, San Francisco, Calif.

Lee Hymerling, "The roles of the State/Local Bar Association and Family Law Practitioners in Developing and Maintaining a Unified Family Court," American Bar Association, June 9, 1998, Baltimore, Md.

Jeff Kuhn, "Unified Family Courts and Children," at the Children's Law Institute Annual Conference, January 16, 1999, Albuquerque, N.M.

Hon. Michael Town and Jeff Kuhn, "Unified Family Courts and Children's Issues," at "Imagine A Brighter Future: Solutions for Children in Crisis," Children's Institute International, June 14, 1999, Los Angeles, Calif.

Barbara Babb, Hon. Michael Town, Judith Moran, and Jeff Kuhn, "Substance Abuse and Unified Family Courts," at "Family Courts and Communities: Collaboration for the 21st Century," Annual Meeting of the Association of Family and Conciliation Courts, June 15, 1999, Vancouver, Canada.

Jeffrey Kuhn and Chris Griffin, "Unified Family Courts," American Bar Association Coalition for Justice, October 1999, St. Petersburg, Fla.

World Wide Web Sites

www.abanet.org. "Communities, Families, and the Justice System" on the American Bar Association's Web site includes an overview article about unified family courts, publications, and a discussion group (UFC@abanet.org). Washington, D.C.: American Bar Association, January 1998.

Press Kits and News Releases

A news release "Substance Abuse, Families, and the Courts Focus of ABA Program," sent as a media advisory to approximately 250 newspapers and periodicals and radio and television stations, May 5, 1999.

Print Coverage

"It May Take a Village … or a Specialized Court to Address Family Problems," in The ABA Journal, December 1996.

"Family Court: It Just Makes So Much Sense," in Atlanta Lawyer, August 1997.

"Will Try Project in 3 Tribunals on the Island," in The New Day, September 26, 1997.

"The Stretching of Judicial Reform," in The New Day, September 26, 1997.

"ABA Backs Unified Family Courts," in The ABA Journal, December 1997.

"Fulton in the Family Way," in The Atlanta Constitution, January 26, 1998.

"Community Based Crusade," in The ABA Journal, January 1998.

"Our Continuing Professional Odyssey," in The ABA Journal, August 1998.

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Report prepared by: Lori De Milto
Reviewed by: Robert Crum
Reviewed by: Richard Camer
Program Officer: Elize M. Brown
Program Officer: Rush Russell