New on Video: Training Materials Showing Physicians Techniques of the 'Healthy Steps for Young Children' Program

Multimedia training package for healthy steps program

The Independent Production Fund, in collaboration with Toby Levine Communications completed the preproduction phase of a multimedia training package for Healthy Steps for Young Children (Healthy Steps), a new approach to pediatric care that focuses on the first three years of life (for more about Healthy Steps, see Program Results on ID# 040304).

Boston University School of Medicine currently trains practitioners in Healthy Steps as part of the demonstration program funded by the Commonwealth Fund. The training package was needed to permit broad dissemination of the Healthy Steps approach.

Key Results

  • Independent Production Fund and Toby Levine Communications produced prototypes for two videos and an interactive CD-ROM, along with draft guides to accompany each video.
  • The videos illustrate existing Healthy Steps practices and demonstrate effective home visits.
  • The CD-ROM presents infant behaviors and allows practitioners to hone their skills at responding to those behaviors.
  • An independent firm, Research Communications, Ltd., conducted pilot tests of the materials with 12 non-Healthy Steps practices.
  • Staff at Independent Production FUnd and its partner also developed objectives, a production plan, and a budget for the production phases and ultimate dissemination of the CD-ROM, a video library, and a print introduction and training manual.
  • The Commonwealth Fund is funding phase two of this four-phase project, during which Independent Production Fund staff will edit and revise the training materials.

Healthy Steps

Started with funding from the Commonwealth Fund, whose former president Margaret Mahoney chairs its National Advisory Committee, Healthy Steps emphasizes a close relationship between health care professionals and parents in addressing the physical, emotional, and intellectual growth and development of very young children.

Funding

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) provided a $199,045 grant for the project.

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