RWJF Culture of Health Prize Winners

Stories about U.S. communities that are making great strides in their journey toward better health.

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Each year, RWJF honors communities that are creating powerful partnerships and deep commitments to drive local change, ensuring all residents have an opportunity to make healthy choices in their schools, workplaces and neighborhoods.

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Awards Eight Communities the RWJF Culture of Health Prize

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation announced the winners of the 2015 RWJF Culture of Health Prize, which honors communities that are working to ensure that everyone has the opportunity to live a longer, healthier, and more productive life.

Watch the webcast

Read the news release

What it Takes to Win

In 2016, up to 10 winning communities will each receive a $25,000 cash prize and have their success stories celebrated and shared broadly to inspire locally-driven change across the nation.  

Learn more about the Prize criteria and application process

Beacons of Progress for Healthier Places

Beacons of Progress for Healthier Places

Beacons of Progress for Healthier Places

The RWJF Culture of Health Prize communities reflect the Culture of Health vision in action.
The RWJF Culture of Health Prize communities reflect the Culture of Health vision in action.

Beacons of Progress for Healthier Places

The RWJF Culture of Health Prize communities reflect the Culture of Health vision in action.

Learn about the communities who have won this prize

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Bridgeport, CT: 2015 Culture of Health Prize Winner

October 28, 2015 | Story

Innovative “green” strategies have revitalized Bridgeport and created a healthy, sustainable environment. The transformation has not only boosted the economy, but is also leading to new schools, housing, green spaces—and opportunities for health.

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The Bronx, NY: 2015 Culture of Health Prize Winner

October 28, 2015 | Story

Residents and organizations of the Bronx have united to revitalize everything from jobs and schools to housing and the environment. From 1985 to 2013, life expectancy at birth increased by 9.7 and 6.5 years for Bronx men and women, respectively.

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Everett, MA: 2015 Culture of Health Prize Winner

October 28, 2015 | Story

In Everett, if all residents are to be healthy, racial justice and economic opportunity are essential. Community-police relations and expanding resident access to jobs that pay livable wages are a core focus of their work.

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Kansas City, MO: 2015 Culture of Health Prize Winner

October 28, 2015 | Story

Kansas City is creating a safe, healthy environment for all its residents by addressing what impacts health. Over the past decade, life expectancy improved for all. The gap between white and African-American residents was reduced from 6.5 to 5 years.

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Lawrence, MA: 2015 Culture of Health Prize Winner

October 28, 2015 | Story

Lawrence is making schools a community hub where parents get help for their children and financial and employment guidance for themselves. This has helped to raise the high school graduation rate from 52% in 2011 to 67% last year.

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Menominee Nation, WI: 2015 Culture of Health Prize Winner

October 28, 2015 | Story

Menominee Nation is improving health by reclaiming traditional culture and using trauma-specific interventions to foster healing from historical losses. As a result, 4-year graduation rates increased from less than 60% in 2007 to nearly 99% in 2014.

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Spartanburg County, SC: 2015 Culture of Health Prize Winner

October 28, 2015 | Story

Data driven decision making, partnerships, and collective impact—that is the Spartanburg way. They are connecting low-income residents to medical homes and support for the social determinants of health, resulting in a 42% drop in hospital costs.

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Waaswaaganing Anishinaabeg (Lac du Flambeau) Tribe, WI: 2015 Culture of Health Prize Winner

October 28, 2015 | Story

The Waaswaaganing Anishinaabeg (Lac du Flambeau) Tribe is drawing on cultural traditions to strengthen well-being. A youth program uses practices steeped in the Ojibwe language to improve school attendance and redirect at-risk youth.

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