Extending the Cure

Bacteria that are resistant to antibiotics are spreading faster than our efforts to stop them.

Over five years, Extending the Cure (ETC), based at the Center for Disease Dynamics, Economics & Policy (CDDEP), helped raise broad awareness about the growing threat of antibiotic resistance and offered comprehensive solutions to address the problem – from better infection control to the development of new, more powerful drugs.

ETC produced extensive research and commentary on the increase in drug resistant infections, so called “superbugs,” and the costs—both human and economic—posed by rising resistance rates. Its annually updated ResistanceMap reveals alarming trends in overuse of antibiotics, a key driver of antibiotic resistance.

This research has provided national, state and local health leaders with valuable information and tools to help better target their efforts to reduce inappropriate use, curb the spread of infections, and extend antibiotic effectiveness.

Contact

The Center for Disease Dynamics, Economics & Policy

Washington, D.C.

Ramanan Laxminarayan, PhD, MPH
Project Director

Brian Quinn, assistant vice president, Research and Evaluation

Brian Quinn, assistant vice president, Research and Evaluation

A Pioneering Approach to a Public Health Problem

At RWJF, we believe today’s health care problems demand innovative solutions. Former grantee Extending the Cure (ETC) took a unique approach, looking at this public health problem through an economic lens. ETC proposed comprehensive, incentive-based solutions that both discourage unnecessary antibiotic use and encourage the development of new drug therapies, among other strategies,” says Brian C. Quinn, assistant vice president, Research and Evaluation.

#Superbugs contribute to more deaths than AIDS, traffic accidents, or flu combined.

In 2012, Extending the Cure released a three-minute animated video that tells the story of how antibiotic-resistant “superbug” bacteria have become a serious public health threat that affects everyone. The video frames the problem uniquely: We must treat antibiotics as a natural resource that can be depleted with overuse, just like water, trees, and other resources on which we all depend.

The video lays out specific steps that everyone – including doctors, hospitals, and consumers – can take to tackle the problem.

In 2012, Extending the Cure released a three-minute animated video that tells the story of how antibiotic-resistant “superbug” bacteria have become a serious public health threat that affects everyone. The video frames the problem uniquely: We must treat antibiotics as a natural resource that can be depleted with overuse, just like water, trees, and other resources on which we all depend. The video lays out specific steps that everyone—including doctors, hospitals, and consumers—can take to tackle the problem.

Related Content from Extending the Cure

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Are Physicians' Prescribing Decisions Sensitive to Drug Prices?

October 24, 2013 | Journal Article

This paper sheds new light on the role of patient-level factors, and in particular, cost considerations in the physicians' prescribing decisions.

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Trends in Resistance to Carbapenems and Third-Generation Cephalosporins among Clinical Isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae in the United States, 1999-2010

March 1, 2013 | Journal Article

Increases in the prevalence of drug-resistant pneumonia present a major infection control challenge for public health.

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"One-Size-Fits-All"?

January 1, 2012 | Journal Article

This study suggests the current "one-size-fits-all" view of antibiotic dosing is too simple. The authors call for the development of a functional taxonomy of pathogens and a dynamic understanding of drug dosing.