Research on the implementation and impact of California's Proposition 36, a diversion program for non-violent drug-possession offenders

The Foundation's Substance Abuse Policy Research Program was designed to encourage experts in public health, law, political science, medicine, sociology, criminal justice, economics, psychology, and other behavioral and policy sciences to address issues related to substance abuse.In November 2000, a majority of California voters approved Proposition 36, a diversion program aimed at nonviolent drug possession offenses. Under the provisions of Proposition 36, an offender convicted of a "nonviolent drug possession offense" will generally be sentenced to probation instead of state prison, county jail, or probation without drug treatment. As a condition of probation, the offender is required to complete a drug treatment program. This grant supports a study to: (1) determine if there are racial disparities in participation in Proposition 36 drug treatment versus parole and, if so, the extent to which these differences can be attributed to the social attributes of the offenders; (2) determine whether racial disparities in participation in Proposition 36 drug treatment versus parole are influenced by neighborhood-level attributes over and above the offender's own characteristics; (3) compare racial group differences in access to services through the development of a geocoded database of available treatment programs, social services, and public transportation lines; and (4) evaluate the extent to which the impact of the offender's characteristics is independent versus conditional upon neighborhood-level attributes or accessibility to treatment programs, social services, and public transportation lines.

Grant Details

Amount Awarded $24,927.00

Awarded on: 7/29/2002

Time frame: 8/1/2002 - 7/31/2004

Grant Number: 46304

Grantee

Rand Corporation

1776 Main Street
P.O. Box 2138
Santa Monica, CA, 90401-2138

310-393-0411
Website

Nell G. Forge
Project Director

310-393-0411
Email