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Design That Heals: The American Institute of Architects Rewrites the Rules

Apr 9, 2015, 9:27 AM, Posted by Sheree Crute

The South Bronx's Via Verde, an award-winning affordable housing complex designed around equity and social cohesion, shows us a new era of healthy design is here—and it's contagious.
 

Via Verde (Image credit: David Sundberg/Esto)

Each winter, Raquel Lizardi and her heartiest garden club members brave the New York City cold to tend their community’s apple trees. “They are very delicate,” Lizardi says, sharing her training at GrowNYC, a nonprofit that seeks to create a healthier environment in the city, block by block. Their efforts ensure that the small orchard yields barrels of sweet Red Delicious, Gala, and slightly tart McIntosh apples for Lizardi and her neighbors in the fall.

Come spring, the group turns its attention to planting enough organic spinach, collards, kale, berries, tomatoes, other vegetables, and herbs to keep all of their tables filled with free, fresh produce.

The orchard, gardens, and grove of evergreens where Lizardi and her neighbors come together are a center of community activity at Via Verde/The Green Way, an award-winning, affordable housing development that rises above a quiet street just off bustling Third Avenue in the South Bronx. Built on a former garbage-strewn lot and Brownfield in 2012, Via Verde is now an international symbol of healthy design achievement.

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If Victor Cruz Tells Us to Eat Our Veggies, Will Kids Listen?

Apr 8, 2015, 9:30 AM, Posted by John R. Lumpkin

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation is proud to be a part of the new FNV campaign, using lessons from the marketing industry to make the healthy choice the easy and cool choice by promoting fruits and vegetables.

As my colleague Alonzo Plough recently pointed out, food and beverage marketing to kids is a big deal. Companies spend billions of dollars a year on advertising to reach young people everywhere they are: watching TV, playing digital games and using apps, and connecting to friends and family on social media―the ways to catch their attention seem to grow day by day.

Companies spend billions of dollars because marketing works. Ads can influence the foods and beverages children prefer, purchase, and consume. Even parents can have a hard time seeing through marketing.

That’s why I’m so excited about the launch of FNV.

I was recently at the Partnership for a Healthier America Summit where FNV (which stands for fruits and vegetables) was unveiled—a campaign to put the same promotional muscle behind fruits and veggies as other companies put behind soda, candy, and potato chips.

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From High Schooler to Activist: How I Came to Build a Culture of Health in East LA

Apr 7, 2015, 2:12 PM

A young activist tells the story of her journey empowering students to influence the health in their local community. This article was originally published in Equal Voice for Families on January 26, 2015.

I was a student at Woodrow Wilson High School in Los Angeles from 2005 to 2009. The school sits on top of a hill, overlooking the city. We had a great view, but our predominantly Latino student body did not have the resources to aspire. Books were dated, classes were crowded, there were few counselors and there weren’t enough teachers. My working-class community struggled with jobs and survival. I did not know how to interpret and change what I, and many of my friends, were experiencing—peer-on-peer violence, racial tensions, gang violence, broken families, and poor health, all the outcomes of an impoverished community.

My school friend Cindy fell into gang life at an early age. I saw her investment in the gang increase until she eventually stopped attending school and I lost contact. I began to wonder if any of the adults at our school tried to support her. Looking back, I believe that Cindy’s path was partially the result of the lack of student support in our education system.

One day, I found an opportunity to create change, or should I say, it found me.

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How Can We Use a Wealth of Data to Improve the Health of Communities Across the Nation?

Apr 6, 2015, 11:15 AM, Posted by Alonzo L. Plough

There's a wealth of data that paints a picture of the health challenges and successes of communities across the country. It's critical to use that data to measure progress in order to raise the grade of our nation's health.

Signs of Progress - Philadelphia

For local health officials across the nation, the release of the 2015 County Health Rankings gives communities an important opportunity to reflect on how they are doing when it comes to the health of their residents. The Rankings are a snapshot capturing the healthiest or least healthy counties in a given state.

But the Rankings also give communities a chance to delve deeper and explore beyond the headlines and the misrepresentative “best and worst” lists. Through the Rankings, we can really dive into data that can help us understand how to build a Culture of Health for citizens in all counties across the nation.

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Use Data for Health, Not for Data’s Sake

Apr 2, 2015, 10:10 AM, Posted by Hilary Heishman

Using data for health is most powerful when you know what problems you're trying to solve. The latest Data for Health report looks at how we can harness that data to source community solutions.

Financial chart, close-up

A few months ago, community members and leaders from an array of local organizations came together in Philadelphia, Des Moines, San Francisco, Phoenix, and Charleston, to talk about ways they and others around them use data to improve health—as well as the hopes, concerns, and challenges they face in collecting and sharing data.

After listening to and reading about these conversations that were part of the Data for Health listening series, this piece of practical wisdom captured in a new report on what we learned from those meetings jumped out at me:

The real question is not 'What data do you want to collect?' but rather, 'What problem do you want to solve?'

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Data, Meet Curiosity: Finding Bright Spots in Appalachia

Apr 1, 2015, 9:20 AM, Posted by David Krol

There are so many opportunities to connect the wealth of data we have at our fingertips and to start asking new questions. David Krol tells his story about how he took this approach to find bright spots in Appalachia.

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If you close your eyes and picture Appalachia, what do you see? The images that often arose first in my mind were those from LIFE Magazine’s 1964 photo essay on the war on poverty. Photojournalist John Dominis gave the nation a face to the plight of Appalachian communities in Eastern Kentucky, and poverty and economic hardship have long been central to an outsider’s understanding of the region ever since. But through my work at the Foundation, I knew this narrative was only one part of the region’s rich and diverse story. I knew there was a different story to be told, and so I wanted to shine a light on these bright spots that demonstrate how health can flourish across Appalachia.

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Let's Keep the Payment Reform Momentum Going

Mar 31, 2015, 10:22 AM, Posted by Andrea Ducas

Recent advancements in payment reform have been massive and exciting. It's time to sustain the momentum and transform how we pay for and deliver care.

Hundred Dollar Bill Modified image. Original photo by Ervins Strauhmanis.

When it comes to how health care providers are paid, change is in the air. I’m probably more excited than most people about trying to make sure our financial incentives are flowing the right way within the health care system. Here’s why.

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The 2015 Rankings and Philadelphia’s Power of ‘Brotherly Love’

Mar 25, 2015, 12:15 AM, Posted by Donald F. Schwarz

Rather than taking poverty and its ravaging effects on health as a given, Philly leaders and citizens came together to usher in change that would make the city a healthier and better place to live for everyone.

Philadelphia skyline

If you want to understand the texture of a large city, drive from its downtown and make your way out to the suburbs. With few exceptions, you’ll encounter pockets of poverty transitioning into mixed income neighborhoods and, finally, wealth and privilege in the suburbs.

I have lived in Philadelphia—the nation’s 5th most-populous city and 21st most populous county—for most of my adult life, and that is her reality. As a former public health official, I can tell you that such income gradients have a profound impact on the health of our populations.

The 2015 County Health Rankings released today are unique in their ability to arm government agencies, health care providers, community organizations, business leaders, policymakers, and the public with local data that can be applied to strengthen communities and build a true Culture of Health.

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Imagining the Future of Health Data

Mar 23, 2015, 3:15 PM, Posted by Susannah Fox

The possibilities to use data for health feel endless when you allow communities to dream out loud. Those dreams may soon become reality with upcoming recommendations from the Data4Health Advisory Committee.

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I have found that the only way to understand an emerging field is to listen, to set aside assumptions, and to let people’s own hopes and fears guide the discussion. That is the genius of the Data4Health project, which recently completed a five-city listening tour and returned with a set of insights that will benefit everyone who cares about the future of health and health care.

On April 2nd, during an event in Washington, D.C., the Data4Health Advisory Committee will release a report based on these insights with a set of comprehensive recommendations for how data can be collected, shared, protected and translated in ways that benefit individuals and communities.

My favorite quote in the report captures the importance of staying humble in the face of all that we do not know:

The complexities of people’s lives don’t always fit well in a drop down box.

We can make educated guesses about people’s interests in collecting and sharing health data, but until we give them a chance to dream out loud, we don’t know what is possible.

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A TED Dare: Here’s Reality. Now Do Something About it.

Mar 19, 2015, 12:31 AM, Posted by Jessica Mark

TED Ensure Healthy Communities

Everyone in America deserves a chance to live the healthiest life possible. The reality is a bit more complicated: A person’s ZIP code, after all, can be as important as their genetic code when it comes to determining health. A true Culture of Health in the United States won’t be possible unless we address the inequities that allow some full access to a healthier life, while others are left to struggle.

This week, RWJF arrived at the TED conference in Vancouver, British Columbia, with a challenge for attendees: Try to understand what millions of people face in their pursuit of a healthy life. And in the spirit of the conference’s “Truth & Dare” theme, we dared the TED participants to envision a future in which everyone had access and a path to a healthier life. How might that happen? So far we’re hearing incredible ideas: let’s get to a place where we can celebrate justice rather than seek justice. Let’s make smarter choices about where we spend our health care.

We’ve enlisted five talented—brilliant, really—young filmmakers to help us. We asked each of them to tell the stories of their lives and to document the challenges that sometimes seem distant, but that are all too real for the people in their worlds. Check out their remarkable stories:

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