Explore the Blog Explore Blog

Author Archives: Sheree Crute

A New World of Healthy Design–That You Wear

Jul 6, 2015, 10:32 AM, Posted by Sheree Crute

Wearable technologies have the power to make communicating with health care providers seamless and easy—opening up a new frontier for data tracking and treatment.

Google glass Image via Giuseppe Costantino

Gary Wellman is living the dream. Every morning, he is treated to the nearly cloudless sky that frames Arizona’s nearby Santa Rita Mountains. A retired basketball coach, 72-year-old Wellman happily shares that he “lives on a golf course in Green Valley,” and likes to keep busy. “You can’t sit around when you have arthritis and diabetes like I do.”

About a year ago, Wellman hopped out of his golf cart, stood up to reach for his clubs and found himself on the ground. He suffered from numbness in his feet, a common symptom of diabetes. After that day, Wellman says, “I began to fall a lot on the course. My doctors did all kinds of tests and came up with nothing.”

That is until Wellman’s physician suggested he participate in an experimental treatment for loss of balance conducted in the lab of Bijan Najafi, PhD, a surgeon and director of the Interdisciplinary Consortium on Advanced Motion Performance at the University of Arizona.

View full post

Design That Heals: The American Institute of Architects Rewrites the Rules

Apr 9, 2015, 9:27 AM, Posted by Sheree Crute

The South Bronx's Via Verde, an award-winning affordable housing complex designed around equity and social cohesion, shows us a new era of healthy design is here—and it's contagious.
 

Via Verde (Image credit: David Sundberg/Esto)

Each winter, Raquel Lizardi and her heartiest garden club members brave the New York City cold to tend their community’s apple trees. “They are very delicate,” Lizardi says, sharing her training at GrowNYC, a nonprofit that seeks to create a healthier environment in the city, block by block. Their efforts ensure that the small orchard yields barrels of sweet Red Delicious, Gala, and slightly tart McIntosh apples for Lizardi and her neighbors in the fall.

Come spring, the group turns its attention to planting enough organic spinach, collards, kale, berries, tomatoes, other vegetables, and herbs to keep all of their tables filled with free, fresh produce.

The orchard, gardens, and grove of evergreens where Lizardi and her neighbors come together are a center of community activity at Via Verde/The Green Way, an award-winning, affordable housing development that rises above a quiet street just off bustling Third Avenue in the South Bronx. Built on a former garbage-strewn lot and Brownfield in 2012, Via Verde is now an international symbol of healthy design achievement.

View full post

What Will It Take to Diversify Medicine?

Jan 28, 2015, 3:00 PM, Posted by Sheree Crute

Every few weeks, Dana Todd, MD, does something rare for an American physician:  She makes a house call. The visits are her way of making life easier for a bedridden stroke survivor and her caregiver daughter.

“One afternoon, I looked out into the clinic waiting room and there they were,” Todd recalls. “My patient was laying on a stretcher. Her daughter was by her side. Her family was adamantly against putting her in a nursing home because she is only in her 50s, so coming in was the only way she could get care. I just hated seeing her that way so I said, ‘Next time, I’ll come to you.’”

Todd is one of four primary care physicians who, along with a small group of nurse practitioners, provide care for residents of Greensboro, Ala., population 2,440, in rural Hale County. The little town, though, is a lot more to Todd than a place to work. 

View full post

Every Child Counts: Stopping Infant Loss

Nov 13, 2014, 3:08 PM, Posted by Sheree Crute

mother with son on her lap

“Matthew was born big and healthy, just under eight pounds,” Carol Jordan says.

That’s why it was such a shock to her to lose him on an otherwise average Sunday afternoon.

“We had just gotten home from church. My daughter Taylor and my other son Jacob settled in with their video games,” Carol recalls. “I breastfed Matthew and lay him down on his back in his bassinet. He was 3 and ½ months old. About 30 minutes later, I went to check on him. He was on his stomach and he was not breathing.”

View full post

Are E-Cigs a Gateway to Smoking for Teens?

Aug 21, 2014, 3:44 PM, Posted by Sheree Crute

Vaping Electronic Cigarette

As you step through the door of Beyond Vape, you are enveloped in the warm scent of vanilla, tinged with butterscotch. The sleek glass counters and display cases are reminiscent of a high-end cigar shop, but there are no tobacco leaves on hand here. This popular, high-end “vaping” parlor, on one of Williamsburg Brooklyn’s more popular streets, is one of seven the company owns on the East and West Coasts.

Vaping—or inhaling richly flavored, heated vapor through a slender, battery-powered tube—is the latest trend in “smoking,” without actually lighting a traditional cigarette. Cindy Hsu, the store’s manager, explains that some of her customers “vape" without even adding liquid nicotine to the tube’s cylinder. “They prefer to just enjoy the extensive menu of flavors such as mocha mint, kiwi strawberry and pineapple.”

Tasty flavors are one thing, but there’s another popular incentive to vape: the claim that vaping can help you stop smoking. Another neighborhood shop, Brooklyn Vaper, advertises its wares with a video explaining that vaping is a “greener, cheaper alternative to help you quit smoking effortlessly... while vaping in 40 flavors.”

Is that true? Can vaping or pre-packaged e-cigarettes help smokers quit?

View full post

Help or Hype: The True Costs of Robotic Surgery

Jul 14, 2014, 10:29 AM, Posted by Sheree Crute

Robotic Surgery

Joe Meyer is the model of a well-educated, engaged patient. A self-described “typical Midwestern guy” who settled in Chapel Hill, N.C., to raise a family and build a career, Meyer did everything in his power to make the best decisions when his 2013 physical produced unexpected and frightening results.

“I live a pretty healthy lifestyle. I exercise. I eat well,” says the 62-year-old chief operating officer of a large manufacturing company. “I was very surprised when my PSA test came back at 5.1 [3 to 4 is normal]. Further testing showed that I had prostate cancer.”

One of more than 200,000 men who are diagnosed each year, Meyer put his faith in his physician and the health care system when gathering information about treatment.

“After the biopsy, they told me my Gleason score was 7. [The higher the score on a scale of 1 to 10, the more likely a cancer will spread.] I realized I was high risk, so I started reading as much as I could about the choices I was offered—hormone therapy, radiation, or prostate removal.” He chose robotic prostatectomy over open or laparoscopic prostatectomy. Surgery, as opposed to hormone therapy or radiation, was widely considered a good decision for someone with Meyer’s prognosis.

View full post

What’s Keeping the Cardiac Polypill off the Market?

Jul 3, 2014, 10:05 AM, Posted by Sheree Crute

Lisa Ranson Lisa Ranson

No matter how busy Lisa Ranson’s morning gets, somewhere between preparing breakfast and suiting up for work or play, she takes the first cluster of eight pills that protect her from a family legacy of heart disease so powerful she had bypass surgery at 34.

Even at that young age, she was no stranger to daily prescription regimens. Growing up, she watched her dad struggle. These days they compare notes. “He’s survived two heart attacks, had bypass surgery, and he has a pacemaker,” Ranson says.

An avid walker who treks three and a half miles most days near her home in the small town of Dunbar, W.Va., Ranson is now 51 and in great shape. But her healthy lifestyle is no match for her genetic inheritance—she is one of 34 million people living with hypercholesterolemia.

View full post