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Author Archives: Hilary Heishman

Harnessing the Power of Shared Data Across Sectors

Jul 24, 2015, 9:47 AM, Posted by Hilary Heishman

Silos of data need to be opened up across sectors to reveal hidden connections with the potential to improve health outcomes. Here's how RWJF is investing in innovative solutions.

Shared data across sectors

A year and a half ago, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation wrote about the groundswell of interest in connecting health care systems with other organizations and their local communities to build a Culture of Health. Since then, the Data4Health listening tour and the launch of Data Across Sectors for Health (DASH), have given more evidence to the importance of data—or the flow of information—in creating and benefitting from these connections. With work the Foundation and others across the country are doing, the “connections checklist” is increasingly taking shape.

In communities large or small, data can become a bridge between one organization’s need and a very different organization’s solution. In Rochester, New York, the business community took a hard look at a most alarming expense they faced—soaring health care costs. In 2009, the Rochester Business Alliance entered into a strategic partnership with the Finger Lakes Health Systems Agency to build a healthier workforce and lower costs. Analyzing data about community health issues revealed a shared concern about high blood pressure. The Agency developed community-based interventions that the Business Alliance and local businesses could use to help their employees and the wider community understand the importance of controlling their blood pressure. Working together, this collaboration has improved the county’s blood-pressure control rate by over 7%.

Underlying this community connection is a data connection between health care and the business community that brings root-cause analysis and rapid-cycle evaluation together to really focus attention towards groups of people who are at highest risk of uncontrolled hypertension. The Agency created a registry of information from electronic health records (EHRs) to fully understand the situation and monitor any changes brought about by their activities. Careful stewardship of sensitive information, real results, and the tantalizing promise of further benefits are sustaining and expanding this partnership.

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Use Data for Health, Not for Data’s Sake

Apr 2, 2015, 10:10 AM, Posted by Hilary Heishman

Using data for health is most powerful when you know what problems you're trying to solve. The latest Data for Health report looks at how we can harness that data to source community solutions.

Financial chart, close-up

A few months ago, community members and leaders from an array of local organizations came together in Philadelphia, Des Moines, San Francisco, Phoenix, and Charleston, to talk about ways they and others around them use data to improve health—as well as the hopes, concerns, and challenges they face in collecting and sharing data.

After listening to and reading about these conversations that were part of the Data for Health listening series, this piece of practical wisdom captured in a new report on what we learned from those meetings jumped out at me:

The real question is not 'What data do you want to collect?' but rather, 'What problem do you want to solve?'

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A Connections Checklist: Bringing Health Care and Communities Together

Dec 10, 2013, 1:34 PM, Posted by Hilary Heishman

Cure Violence Community meeting

The conversation is nearly everywhere I go for work lately. More than cost trends, or accountable care organizations, I hear people in both public health and health care circles talking about how we need to be better connected.

Across a variety of health roles, many people are embracing the belief that individuals and the communities we live in will be better off—regarding health outcomes, health care cost, health disparities, corporate productivity, individual quality of life, and so forth—if health care providers, the public health system, and social services are better connected to each other and to the communities in which patients live.

Fortunately, it’s not all talk. In communities across the nation people are trying their best to connect systems to improve the overall health of those who live there, driven by a combination of compassion, pragmatism, pressure, policies, and overall gestalt.

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