Author Archives: Victoria Brown

How Health Insurers Can Help Kids Reach a Healthy Weight

Jun 1, 2016, 12:30 PM, Posted by Katherine Hempstead, Victoria Brown

Innovative approaches in health insurance can help support youth development and prevent chronic diseases.

While research shows that access to safe neighborhood spaces for physical activity along with affordable healthy foods help families and kids maintain a healthy weight, it’s often not enough.

Health care economist Mike Bertaut illustrated this reality through a deeply personal and passionate post last month. He opened up about his lifelong struggle with obesity and shared some important lessons about how the health care sector can help children maintain a healthy weight. It’s a moving piece worth reading.

As Mike shows us, health care providers—and health insurers—have a critical role to play, especially for children and families at highest risk for obesity and obesity-related disease.

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What’s Working to Help Kids Across America Eat Healthy?

Mar 9, 2016, 9:00 AM, Posted by Tina Kauh, Victoria Brown

Healthy Eating Research expands its commitment to equity through a new funding opportunity that reserves awards for innovative studies focused on rural, American Indian and Asian/Pacific Islander populations.

The students at Native American Community Academy, a member of the Alliance for a Healthier Generation’s Healthy Schools Program, believed their school should serve healthy lunches that incorporated foods indigenous to the Navajo culture. So, they set out to turn their idea into a reality.

The students had an ultimate goal in mind: convince their principal to hire a company that would provide these healthier, more traditional meals. But, first, they had to prove that this type of food service could be done.

They started with the basics. With a budget of no more than $2 per person, students headed to a local grocery store and purchased ingredients for a meal they would prepare on their own and serve to their teachers and administrators to demonstrate that offering healthy Native American food at school is both feasible and affordable.

Their menu for the day: vegetarian chili with beans, blue corn meal mush (a traditional Navajo dish), an organic fruit cup and a dish they called the “Beez Kneez,” which had squash, corn, green chili, garlic and onions. The meal received rave reviews. Not only did the principal agree to find a new food service company, she put the students in charge of the task.

This is just one of many stories that reinforce the important role schools play in teaching kids about nutrition and offering healthy meals, snacks and drinks. Among kids in underserved communities (like the students at Native American Community Academy), the role of schools is especially critical.

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How Food Marketing Can Help Kids Want What’s Good For Them

Aug 11, 2015, 2:45 PM, Posted by Victoria Brown

If we want to ensure that all children are able to grow up at a healthy weight, companies can play a role by continuing to reduce marketing of unhealthy foods and beverages and increase promotion of healthy choices.

When it comes to helping Americans eat healthier, the conversation often focuses on price and access. But, there’s a third, equally consequential, condition: desire. Preference is shaped by myriad factors and the effects of marketing and advertising are of paramount importance. Food and beverage companies spend hundreds of millions of dollars to market their products, and their investments produce results: adults and kids are swayed by marketing.

A new report from the UConn Rudd Center for Food, Policy & Obesity reveals that a majority of the largest food and beverage companies are spending a disproportionate amount of money advertising their nutritionally poor products to Black and Hispanic consumers, especially youth. While food marketing is not inherently bad—it appears Sesame Street characters could be great “salespuppets” for fruits and veggies—it becomes a problem when it features unhealthy products known to contribute to obesity and other poor health outcomes. And, with rates of overweight/obesity higher among Black and Hispanic kids and teens, this type of business approach is especially harmful.

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New Report: Shifts in the Supermarket Aisles as Demand for Low-Calorie Options Grows

Jun 16, 2015, 10:50 AM, Posted by Victoria Brown

Research shows that supermarkets are responding to the growing demand for lower-calorie options, and that healthier options are good for their bottom line.

At a very basic level, obesity is about an imbalance. Calories in and calories out need to be balanced, and if they’re not, we run the risk of gaining unhealthy weight. Now, that sounds simple, but of course we know it’s not. There’s so much that goes into the choices people, particularly children, are able to make about what they eat and drink and how much they move. The neighborhoods we live in―and where we buy foods and beverages―play an enormous role.

U.S. customers spend over $638 billion in supermarkets every year, so these stores have a major impact on what we all eat and drink every day. A recent report shows that, in keeping with recent changes to consumer demand, supermarkets are increasing their sales of lower-calorie items, and seeing financial benefits because of it.

Between 2009 and 2013, lower-calorie foods and beverages drove the bulk of supermarket sales growth, 59 percent, compared with just 41 percent for higher-calorie items. They also made up 58 percent of total supermarket sales.

This is great news, as it shows supermarkets are responding to the growing demand for lower-calorie options, and that their business performance is benefitting as a result.

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