Archive for: 2014

Open mHealth Announces Linq

Sep 8, 2014, 1:58 PM, Posted by Pioneer Blog Team

Linq from grantee OpenMHealth

What's Next Health: Jammed Up: Is Too Much Choice Bad for Our Health?

Sep 4, 2014, 2:28 PM, Posted by Lori Melichar

Too Many Choices

Each month, What’s Next Health talks with leading thinkers about the future of health and health care. Recently, we talked with Sheena Iyengar, Inaugural S.T. Lee Professor of Business at Columbia University, about navigating the thousands of choices we make daily – and the stress that comes with making so many decisions. In this post, RWJF Director Lori Melichar reflects on Sheena's visit to the Foundation.

Each of us makes choices constantly and those choices reverberate across other aspects of our lives. By choosing to read this blog, you’ve chosen to place something else on hold.

Depending on the time of day you read this, you have likely made hundreds of distinct choices today...from choosing to hit snooze one...or two, or three times, to choosing what to eat for breakfast, where to park and whether to take the stairs or the elevator in your office or home.

I don't have to tell you that so many of the choices you have made in the last 24 hours already will affect your health, your bodies (those of you who had green smoothies for breakfast are probably feeling a little better than those who, like me, had a muffin), as well as your mental health (how many of you, like me, are regretting your decision to stay up to watch another episode of The Americans instead of getting eight hours of sleep?). Many of the choices you make are simple, but many are extremely complex. 

The emerging science that helps us understand why we make the choices we do—and how to influence those choices—is equally complex.

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Patient Privacy: The Elephant in the Room

Aug 25, 2014, 12:30 PM, Posted by Al Shar

Albert Shar / RWJF

Albert Shar, managing principle at QERT and former Robert Wood Johnson Foundation vice president and senior program officer reflects on lessons learned from the RWJF-funded project, “Testing a system of establishing voluntary patient identification across multiple health care records to improve outcomes and reduce costs” (Shar is a guest blogger. His opinions are not necessarily those of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation).

When it comes to improving patient safety, patient privacy is the elephant in the room.

Virtually every developed country except the United States has a method for identifying patients.  Misidentification of patients is not only costly and inefficient—it’s also dangerous.  According to data from the Institute of Medicine and the Joint Commission, in the U.S., nearly 60 percent of the 200,000 deaths per year caused by medical errors are cases of mistaken identity.

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Exploring Citizen Science

Jul 31, 2014, 11:34 AM, Posted by Christine Nieves

Christine Nieves / RWJF Christine Nieves, program associate

I remember the distinct feeling of learning about Foldit. It was a mixture of awe and hope for the potential breakthrough contributions a citizen can make towards science (without needing a PhD!). Foldit is an online puzzle video game about protein folding. In 2011, Foldit users decoded an AIDS protein that had been a mystery to researchers for 15 years. The gamers accomplished it in 3 weeks. When I learned this, it suddenly hit me; if we, society, systematically harness the curiosity of citizens, we could do so much!

This is the spirit behind our recent exploration to learn more about how citizen scientists are addressing some of the most pressing problems in health and health care.

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RWJF Pioneering Ideas Podcast: Episode 5 | Conspiracy Theories, Microbiomes & More

Jul 30, 2014, 12:00 PM, Posted by Pioneer Blog Team

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Welcome to the fifth episode of RWJF’s Pioneering Ideas podcast, where we explore cutting edge ideas and emerging trends that can help build a Culture of Health. Your host is Lori Melichar, director at the foundation.

Ideas Explored in This Episode

Conspiracy Theories (1:44) – What in the world can belief in conspiracy theories tell us about health and health care? A lot, as you’ll hear in this fascinating conversation between RWJF’s Brian Quinn and University of Chicago political scientist and RWJF grantee Eric Oliver. For more on this story, see this blog post from Brian; and don’t miss The Onion’s send-up of Eric’s research.

How Can We Measure a Culture of Health? (18:45) – Alonzo Plough, our Chief Science Officer and Vice President of Research, Evaluation and Learning riffs on the challenges and opportunities when it comes to measuring culture change.

Microbiomes and Design (26:25) – We sit down with microbiome scientist Jessica Green to hear the results of her latest research at the intersection of biology and environmental design. Explore early ideas about the huge ways tiny microbes might one day help create a healthier world. To learn more visit microbe.net, a rich website of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation’s Microbiology of the Built Environment program led by Jonathan Eisen.

Exploring Sleep Health (32:25) – Harvard economist Sendhil Mullinaithan, author of Scarcity: Why Having Too Little Means So Much, talks about the importance of getting more people to recognize the ripple effect of sleep on our mental and physical wellbeing.

Connect About This Episode

Visit Lori Melichar's Culture of Health blog post to read more about understanding the root causes of sleep health and to weigh in on the issue. Tell us: If you are a sleep champion, what are your secrets? Why do you think we aren't getting enough sleep?

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