What’s Next Health: Whom Do We Trust?

May 28, 2013, 8:00 AM, Posted by Pioneer Blog Team

danah boyd danah boyd, senior researcher at Microsoft Research

Each month, What’s Next Health talks with leading thinkers with big ideas about the future of health and healthcare. Recently, we talked with danah boyd, senior researcher at Microsoft Research, to explore contradictions and conundrums of living in a networked society.

By Danah Boyd

We live in a society that is more networked than our grandparents could ever have imagined. More people have information at their fingertips than ever before. It's easy to see all of this potential and celebrate the awe-some power of the internet. But as we think about the intersection of technology and society, there are so many open questions and challenging conundrums without clear answers. One of the most pressing issues has to do with trust, particularly as people turn to the internet and social media as a source of health information. We are watching shifts in how people acquire information. But who do they trust? And is trust shifting?

WNH logo- no Pioneer branding 2-14-13

Consider the recent American presidential election, which is snarkily referred to as “post-factual.” The presidential candidates spoke past one another, refusing to be pinned down. News agencies went into overdrive to fact-check each statement made by each candidate, but the process became so absurd that folks mostly just gave up trying to get clarity. Instead, they focused on more fleeting issues like whether or not they trusted the candidates.

In a world where information is flowing fast and furious, many experience aspects of this dynamic all the time. People turn to their friends for information because they do not trust what's available online. I’ve interviewed teenagers who, thanks to conversations with their peers and abstinence-only education, genuinely believe that if they didn't get pregnant the last time they had sex, they won't get pregnant this time. There's so much reproductive health information available online, but youth turn to their friends for advice because they trust those "facts" more.

The internet introduces the challenges of credibility but it also highlights the consequences of living in a world of information overload, where the issue isn't whether or not the fact is out there and available, but how much effort a person must go through to manage making sense of so much information. Why should someone trust a source on the internet if they don't have the tools to assess the content’s credibility?  It’s often easier to turn to friends or ask acquaintances on Facebook for suggestions. People use the “lazy web” because friends are more likely to respond quickly and make sense than trying to sort out what’s available through Google.

As we look to the future, organizations that focus on the big issues—like the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation—need to think about what it means to create informed people in a digital era. How do we spread accurate information through networks? How do we get people to trust abstract entities that have no personal role in their lives?"

Questions around internet and trust are important: What people know and believe will drive what they do and this will shape their health.

The beauty of this moment, with so many open questions and challenges, is that we are in a position to help shape the future by delicately navigating these complex issues. Thus, we must be asking ourselves: How can we collectively account for different stakeholders and empower people to make the world a better place?

For more on danah’s ideas, visit What’s Next Health to watch a conversation with danah and RWJF's Steve Downs and view an infographic about a patient's conundrums in a networked society.