Archive for: May 2013

Return to Oz: Behind the Curtain at Khan Academy

Jun 6, 2013, 11:00 AM, Posted by Mike Painter

Dr. Paul Wang addresses students at Stanford Medical School Dr. Paul Wang addresses students at Stanford Medical School

I recently stepped out of my largely virtual, long distance relationship with the Khan Academy and went behind the wizard’s curtain to see how it’s actually done.  Certainly, we here at RWJF have met many Khan personalities in real life, including Sal, himself, as well as Dr. Rishi Desai, who leads the Khan Healthcare and Medicine Initiative. However, it's one thing to meet individuals outside of their natural habitat—and quite another to track them back to their offices in Mountain View, California, and see what gives. 

From SFO, I carefully followed my Droid Navigator’s directions off Highway 101 into a warren of non-descript low-slung office buildings—non-descript except for the telltale proliferation of Google signs and young adults riding colorful Google bikes.  I drove around to the back of several of those complexes and finally found the correct numbered grouping.  It really could have been any office or doctors’ office complex in the U.S.  The Khan suite is on the second floor. 

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Dispatches from Datapalooza: Bringing My 'A' Game

May 31, 2013, 9:00 AM, Posted by Christine Nieves

christine_nieves_hz_1_c

From: Christine Nieves

To: Paul Tarini, Beth Toner and Thomas Goetz

Date: May 31, 2013

This is my first time attending Health Datapalooza, and I am intrigued. I am fascinated by the fact that there will be a reception at the National Zoo on Sunday evening and a 7 a.m. run to kick us off Tuesday morning. It's not just any run, though—it will be led by Bryan Sivak, chief technology officer of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. That’s what I call intense!

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Dispatches from Datapalooza: The New Frontier in Health

May 30, 2013, 8:00 AM, Posted by Paul Tarini

Paul Tarini

From: Paul Tarini

To: Christine Nieves, Beth Toner and Thomas Goetz

Date: May 30, 2013

I'm looking forward to my third Datapalooza conference next week. In many ways, data is the new frontier in helping people lead healthier lives and improving the quality and efficiency of care. I enjoy Datapalooza because it helps us see the current edge of this new frontier—from what data are available and what data people are trying to access, to new ideas about how people are using the data, whether it's for policy or for products and services.

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Health Data: Let's Go Exploring

May 29, 2013, 8:00 AM, Posted by Steve Downs, Lori Melichar

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Think about it for a moment. When you consider what you "know" about health, where does that knowledge come from? While we all have our sources—doctors, friends, news articles—our knowledge at its core is derived from research. And that research is built on a foundation of data.

Data about health typically come from several types of sources: clinical data, gleaned from electronic health records or chart pulls, and billing and claims data, which are byproducts of the health care process; and public health surveillance data, which are specialized collections about particular topics or populations. All of these sources can then be supplemented, at a considerable cost, by original data collection efforts specific to a particular study.

These different types of data are like pieces of a jigsaw puzzle; when assembled, they create a more complete picture of health.

But a piece of the puzzle is missing.  Or it has been up till now.

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What’s Next Health: Whom Do We Trust?

May 28, 2013, 8:00 AM, Posted by Pioneer Blog Team

danah boyd danah boyd, senior researcher at Microsoft Research

Each month, What’s Next Health talks with leading thinkers with big ideas about the future of health and healthcare. Recently, we talked with danah boyd, senior researcher at Microsoft Research, to explore contradictions and conundrums of living in a networked society.

By Danah Boyd

We live in a society that is more networked than our grandparents could ever have imagined. More people have information at their fingertips than ever before. It's easy to see all of this potential and celebrate the awe-some power of the internet. But as we think about the intersection of technology and society, there are so many open questions and challenging conundrums without clear answers. One of the most pressing issues has to do with trust, particularly as people turn to the internet and social media as a source of health information. We are watching shifts in how people acquire information. But who do they trust? And is trust shifting?

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