Archive for: 2012

A Pioneer Auld Lang Syne

Dec 27, 2012, 11:45 AM, Posted by Brian C. Quinn

Brian Quinn, assistant vice president, Research and Evaluation Brian Quinn, assistant vice president, Research and Evaluation

As New Year’s Eve approaches, let’s take a look at a few of Pioneering Ideas’ greatest hits of 2012 one last time.

We rang in 2012 with a post about an idea Steve Downs called simple and dangerous—OpenNotes, an experiment that has enabled patients to read their doctors’ medical notes. We believe OpenNotes has the potential to transform the way patients engage with health care professionals—and take charge of their health.

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Pioneering Idea: Your Patient’s Community Health Needs Assessment on the Desktop

Dec 21, 2012, 10:06 AM, Posted by Ted Eytan

Ted Eytan Ted Eytan

In medical school, we were taught an ahead-of-its-time curriculum called "Community Oriented Primary Care." It looks like now we're going to get to be able to practice it.

When I was with the Project HealthDesign (@PrjHealthDesign) team in Nashville earlier this year (see: A visit to Project HealthDesign and the patient voice, spoken through their observations of daily living | Ted Eytan, MD), we participated in an interesting exercise while wearing silly hats. It involved turning our thinking 180 degrees around about the future of health.

 

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Pioneer Grantee Open mHealth Showcases Work at mHealth Summit 2012

Dec 18, 2012, 9:39 AM, Posted by Pioneer Blog Team

On December 3-5, 2012, Pioneer grantee Open mHealth spread the word about their work at the annual mHealth Summit in Washington, D.C. by hosting a panel session and engaging attendees at RWJF’s exhibit booth. Follow along with this Storify chronicling Open mHealth’s activities at the summit, and learn why their work to integrate apps through an open architecture is what’s next in mHealth.

 

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Calling for Problems

Dec 14, 2012, 9:15 AM, Posted by Brian C. Quinn

Brian Quinn Brian Quinn

In the Pioneer Portfolio, we’re all about ideas—big ones and little ones—the ones that will help solve some of the toughest problems in health and health care. We have clearly articulated our strategy for investing in innovations and innovators who have the potential to transform areas such as the health care delivery system, the patient-provider relationship, and the education of health care professionals. That strategy has yielded some significant breakthroughs, and the hope for much more to come. 

But we’re still missing a big piece of the puzzle. Why? Because right now, we only hear from the folks who have solutions to offer. That approach, by its very nature, limits the number of problems we know about. Those of us who work on the Pioneer team only see health care from the proverbial 30,000-foot vantage point. We are not on the front lines, so we don’t see firsthand the issues health care providers, patients, and families struggle with every single day.

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Can we get off the “gold standard” of academic publishing?

Dec 13, 2012, 9:51 AM, Posted by Paul Tarini

Paul Tarini Paul Tarini

We have witnessed tremendous innovation growth over the last several decades. However, with change comes the need to adjust traditional practices that are standard in health and health care. The academic publishing model is no exception.

The current model of academic publishing treats traditional clinical trials as the gold standard for what gets published. Health and health care observers have long argued that focusing on trial results slows down the process of discovery and hinders practice innovation. In addition, the economics of this traditional publishing model are being challenged in our new reality of online, open-access publishing.

But what is the solution? Can we accelerate how we review and disseminate information without compromising the value of the traditional model? How can we improve on what has become the “gold standard” of academic publishing?

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