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RWJF Pioneering Ideas Podcast: Episode 6 | What if? Shifting Perspectives to Change the World

Oct 20, 2014, 9:00 AM, Posted by Pioneer Blog Team

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Welcome to the sixth episode of RWJF’s Pioneering Ideas podcast, where we explore cutting edge ideas and emerging trends that can help build a Culture of Health. Your host is Lori Melichar, director at the foundation.

Ideas Explored in This Episode

Sharing Health Care Providers’ Notes (3:08) OpenNotesTom Delbanco and Jan Walker talk with RWJF’s Emmy Ganos about why they decided getting health care providers to share their notes with patients was an essential innovation–and where their work is headed next. Here’s a hint: what if the  3 million patients who now have easy access to their clinician’s notes could co-write notes with their providers?

Rethinking How We Solve Poverty (20:27) Kirsten Lodal, founder and CEO of LIFT, talks with RWJF’s Susan Mende and shares some simple ideas with the potential to revolutionize our approach to helping people achieve economic stability and well being. In a thought-provoking conversation, Lodal connects the dots between improving the well being of those living in poverty and building a Culture of Health.

A Historian’s Take on Building a Culture of Health (27:58) – Princeton historian Keith Wailoo and RWJF’s Steve Downs discuss how deeply held cultural narratives influence our perceptions of health, and how today’s “wild ideas” are often tomorrow’s cutting edge innovations.

Sound bites

...On opening up health care providers’ notes and what’s next:

“What I would like to do is spread the responsibility for health beyond the health care system. The health care system is good; I hope that it gets better, but there are so many other parts of our lives that contribute to our well being.” – Jan Walker, OpenNotes 

“It will be a very different world in the future. And we do think that OpenNotes is kind of giving people a peek into it. It's a first glimmer that this kind of transparency, this kind of approach to things, while it's passive now, it just opens up an enormous amount of possibilities for the future. And that's what really excites us.” – Tom Delbanco, OpenNotes

...On rethinking how we solve poverty:

“People's lives are like rivers... they flowed before coming into contact with us, and they will flow after having contact with us. And so the opportunity that we have, the privilege that we have is of most positively affecting the trajectory and the velocity of that flow. But if we forget that–if we get too swept up in having to own everything that happens in a person's life–then we won't build the best solutions, because we won't build solutions that provide people with the support they need to navigate the flow of that river over the long term.” – Kirsten Lodal, LIFT

...A historian’s take on building a Culture of Health: 

“Our concern with aggregate trends is an important one in tracing the shifting demographics of health in our country, but to understand what health actually means involves actually putting the data aside and thinking about lives and thinking about individuals and thinking about what these trends mean on an individual level.”– Keith Wailoo, Princeton University

Your Turn

Now that you’ve listened – talk about it! Did anything you heard today get you thinking in new ways about how you can help build a Culture of Health? Do you have a cutting-edge idea you’d like to discuss? Comment below or tweet at me at @lorimelichar, or consider submitting a proposal. Be sure to keep the conversation and explorations going at #RWJFpodcast.

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With Project ECHO, the U.S. Army Takes a Team Approach to Combating Pain

Feb 11, 2014, 11:30 AM, Posted by Pioneer Blog Team

RWJF grantee Project ECHO is helping the U.S. Army treat service members all over the world who are suffering from chronic pain–a huge, complex, and growing problem for the military. Project ECHO is a collaborative model of medical education and care management that dramatically expands the capacity of primary care clinicians.

The lack of pain specialists in remote areas has been part of the challenge.  Now, primary care providers, such as family doctors and nurse practitioners, are learning to fill this void through Project ECHO, bringing an integrated, holistic approach to pain management that includes massage, acupuncture, biofeedback, and yoga.  At ECHO “boot camps,” specialists and primary care providers learn how to work together as a team.

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Dr. Sanjeev Arora Talks Project ECHO with PBS New Mexico

Dec 19, 2013, 8:00 AM, Posted by Pioneer Blog Team

Dr. Sanjeev Arora, the social entrepreneur and creator of Project ECHO, sat down with PBS’ New Mexico in Focus to talk about how the medical education model is dramatically improving care across the state for some of its most vulnerable and underserved populations.

In this in-depth interview with PBS’ Gene Grant, host of New Mexico in Focus, Dr. Arora describes how Project ECHO is helping primary care clinicians and community health workers manage patients who have chronic conditions requiring complex care. He also reports on how Project ECHO is training a new wave of community-based addiction specialists to combat opiate addiction in New Mexico.

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Dr. Sanjeev Arora Presents Project ECHO at TEDx Albuquerque

Oct 3, 2013, 5:00 PM, Posted by Nancy Barrand

Project ECHO is working to improve health care for underserved populations all over the world, and to do it fast,” Dr. Arora said during his TEDx presentation in Albuquerque last month. With more than 2,000 people in the room, Dr. Arora described how the ECHO model began in rural New Mexico and how it is quickly spreading around the globe to help clinicians on the front lines of care learn new skills and do more for more patients. Watch Dr. Arora’s TEDx presentation and hear his vision for the future.

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Turning Disconnects Into Opportunities

Jun 28, 2013, 8:00 AM, Posted by Wendy Yallowitz

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During my time as a social worker working with our most vulnerable older Americans, I saw firsthand just how much skilled nursing facilities need to do every day to care for our loved ones. Providing that care is always rewarding, but never easy. Residents come and go, and their care needs change daily. Beds go unfilled. Activities go unattended. Food goes uneaten.

While concentrating on providing care to this vulnerable population, we miss out on an opportunity to easily help so many other vulnerable Americans. Every year, nursing facilities let millions of dollars’ worth of medicine that many low-income patients desperately need go to waste.

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