Now Viewing: Health policy

One Size Doesn’t Fit All: Making Incentives Stick

Feb 14, 2014, 9:00 AM, Posted by Pioneer Blog Team

emmy_ganos_hz_1_c

By Emmy Ganos

I work for the country's largest foundation dedicated to health, but I have a secret. I have a huge problem staying away from my go-to comforts: macaroni and cheese, doughnuts, and most of all, the couch. I'm able to keep away from donuts most of the time, by exercising huge degrees of willpower on my way home from work each night (RIGHT PAST the Krispy Kreme). But by the time I get home, that's enough exercising for me, and I'm ready for my macaroni and my couch.

And, another secret, I barely exercise. About once a week, I walk for transportation around Philadelphia, and I walk fast. But that's the full extent of it for me. It is not uncommon for me to spend whole days on the couch -- with a great book and my cat on my lap, working on my laptop, or binge-watching HBO with my husband. I rarely exercise at work--despite free exercise classes and a free gym. 

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Princeton Students Study Health Care in Urban New Jersey

Dec 9, 2013, 12:30 PM, Posted by Christine Nieves

Princeton students at the Trenton Area Soup Kitchen Princeton students at the Trenton Area Soup Kitchen. From left to right: Emma Tucher, Lawrence Chang, Colleen O'Gorman, Gwen Lee, Richard Lu, Daniel Kim, Mina Henaen, Azza Cohe, Justin Ziegler, Arfan Sunny and Jordan Shivers. Photo by Richard Lu.

Recently, I heard through our grantee at Princeton University that a group of students was organizing a weeklong trip to meet with people working to improve health care in urban New Jersey. The students asked to meet with program staff at the Foundation to get recommendations regarding people to meet and key questions to ask, and we obliged. After their trip, we wanted to hear how things had gone, so I reached out via email. I found their curiosity energizing, and hope you do, too.

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Six Ideas for Reducing the Use of Low-Value Health Care

Oct 17, 2013, 8:00 AM, Posted by Lori Melichar

Lori Melichar, director Lori Melichar, director

Two years ago, my colleagues and I knew very little about how to use behavioral economics to improve health care decisions. Today, we know more. We also know how much there is to learn and do in this field.

That’s why we’re excited to announce six new grantees who will continue to build on the work we’ve funded over the last two years to apply principles from behavioral economics to challenges in health care.

The new grantees are as follows:

  • Amber Barnato and Rebecca Sudore, University of Pittsburgh and University of California, San Francisco, Consumer-directed financial incentives to increase advance care planning among Medicaid beneficiaries
  • Jeremiah Schuur, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Inc., Decision Fatigue in the Emergency Department and the Use of Hospital Services
  • Jeffrey Kullgren, University of Michigan Medical School, Decreasing Overuse of Low-Value Health Care Services through Physician Precommitment
  • Mark Vogel and Scott Halpern, Genesys Health System and University of Pennsylvania, BEACON -  Behavioral Economics for Advanced Care OptioNs
  • Richard Frank and Abigail Friedman, Harvard Medical School, Behavioral Experiments in Improving Medicare Coverage Choice
  • Mark Schlesinger and Rachel Grob, Yale University and University of Wisconsin – Madison,  Precommitment, Provider Choice, and Forgoing Low-Value Health Care

If you’re curious about why we’re funding these particular projects at this specific moment in time, read on.

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How Carrots and Sticks May Break Our Bones—and the Bank

Aug 7, 2013, 1:00 PM, Posted by Mike Painter

Mom-Child-Dr (Edited)

Today, the Health Care Incentives Improvement Institute, Inc. (HCI3®) released “Improving Incentives to Free Motivation,” a report developed with support from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF), that makes a bold assertion: Financial incentives won’t fix our payment problems in health care.

In a guest post on The Health Care Blog today, I outlined why simply throwing more carrots and sticks at doctors and patients won’t improve the quality or affordability of our health care:

Until we get [the] human motivators right in health care, we can try all sorts of complicated, elegant payment models and formulas and still ultimately not get to the goal of sustainable high value. It will always be just over the horizon. Let's absolutely be smart about incentives in health care, but let's also get away from talking about simple carrots and sticks. Instead, let’s find the right mix of motivators to promote the creativity we need to get the best care every single time.”

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CRE Bacteria: The Next Superbug Threat in Your Hospital

Apr 2, 2013, 8:30 AM, Posted by Brian C. Quinn

Klebsiella pneumoniae bacteria illustration Klebsiella pneumoniae bacteria illustration courtesy of the CDC

“Bacteria are becoming resistant to antibiotics faster than we can stop them. This problem is now a public health crisis: Infections caused by drug-resistant bacteria contribute to more than 99,000 deaths per year in the U.S. alone – more than AIDS, traffic accidents, and the flu combined.

At RWJF, we believe today’s health care problems demand innovative solutions. Pioneer grantee Extending the Cure takes a unique approach, looking at this public health problem through an economic lens. They propose comprehensive, incentive-based solutions, such as creating incentives to discourage unnecessary antibiotic use and encourage the development of new drug therapies. ETC also recognizes that while we can't beat the bacteria, we can slow them down if we start to view antibiotics differently. Just like water or trees, we must treat these drugs as a natural resource that can be depleted with overuse.

We all have a role to play in making sure antibiotics are around when we need them. In this post on KevinMD, Dr. Daniel J. Morgan tells us what it’s like to face superbugs in the health care system and points out the critical role that hospitals can, and should, play in the effort to stop them.”  — Brian C. Quinn

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